Drama

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ks3 drama

Performing Arts strives to provide a varied, engaging and inclusive curriculum where students will learn to be creative, confident and proficient performing artists. Our curriculum is built on the fundamental key skills in performing, composing, devising and appraising. Through these skills, we explore a breadth of genres and wider social and historical contexts with the aim of building cultural capital and empowering students to appreciate the performing arts throughout their lives.

MYP Assessment Criteria

Criterion A

Investigating

Criterion B

Developing

Criterion C

Creating / Performing

Criterion D

Evaluating

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The form of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how forms of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

  • Criterion A: Understanding what the features of the genre is by exploring a range of performances and analysing the skills used
  • Criterion B: Understanding what skills they will need in order to create a piece for performance

Links to prior learning

Students may have limited experience of Drama. For some this may be the first time they have had a drama lesson taught by a subject specialist. There has been 6 weeks outlined in the unit planning however the first lesson will be based upon an introduction to drama which includes health safety, rules- rewards and sanctions to set high expectations from the beginning, as well as playing drama related games.

In Module 1 students will have their first opportunity to create small performances to slowly build up their confidence as well as develop their understanding of basic physical drama techniques

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the basic physical drama skills (GSPEED)?
  • What is a tableau and freeze frame?
  • What are the effective skills that are needed for a tableau?
  • What is thought tracking?
  • What is cross-cutting and juxtaposition?
  • What is marking the moment?
  • How can a group create a performance?
  • How do you work as part of an ensemble?
  • How can these drama skills improve a performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand GSPEED – Gestures, Stance, Posture and body language, Expression, Eye contact, Dynamics and movement
  • Be able to understand the differences between a tableau and freeze frame
  • Be able to create tableau to be able to tell a story
  • Be able to use thought-tracking within your tableau to make it more effective
  • Understand how juxtaposition, cross-cutting and marking the moment is used in theatre and films
  • Be able to work in small groups to devise a short piece based on Wonder.
  • This should include the drama techniques – tableau, freeze frame, thought-tracking and marking the moment
  • Be able to recall the keywords GSPEED used in physical drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on their work via self-assessment

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

  • Goal : A theatre magazine “To be or not to be” has asked you to help them to write a feature to develop theatre enthusiasts’ understanding of Vocal skills and how the skills represent society and how they can express themselves.
  • Role: A young theatre journalist
  • Audience: theatre enthusiasts
  • Situation : The task involves investigating the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and performing a vocal performance
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce magazine feature- investigate/critique a
    • Voice over/vocal performance (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your vocal performance (B)
    • A completed performance (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect on your performance and your project as a whole (D)

Links to prior learning

Students have had the opportunity to perform in front of their peers and have got experience of performing a character with the use of basic physical drama techniques. They will now flip this concept and use only their voice. DEPART in vocal drama is important with spoken language and being able to communicate a range of emotions and situations.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the basic vocal drama skills(DEPART)?
  • How to stretch your voice by understanding DEPART?
  • How can you use the DEPART to change your voice and therefore create a new character?
  • How do actors use only their voices successfully to create characters?
  • How do you confidently create a character for a performance?
  • How do you work with a partner to perform a script confidently?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand DEPART – Diction and projection, Emphasis and volume, Pitch, Accent, Rhythm and tempo, Tone
  • Be able to have a basic understanding of voice terminology
  • Be able to convey an effective character by using just voice techniques
  • Be able to create an effective voice over from reading a script
  • Be able to create emotion with their voice using DEPART to develop a character
  • Be able to understand some challenging terminology such as tone, pitch, pace and volume modulation, monotone.
  • Be able to recall the keywords used in vocal drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on their work via self-assessment

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Composition can be effective form of communication to reflect human capability and development to an audience

Link to assessment

All summative tasks investigate Commedia Dell’Arte actors who communicate human capability and development through the elements of music, then create your own composition that can attempt to do the same to the intended audience

  • Goal : A local theatre company has asked you to help them to develop actors understanding of how Commedia Dell’Arte is used to reflect human capability and development
  • Role: A young theatre producer
  • Audience: young actors
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other devised pieces and creating your own finalised devised work
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce information pack:
    • Investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your Commedia Dell’Arte devised piece (B)
    • A completed composition (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements through musical theatre music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ are now being introduced to the basics of DAW’s and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the origin of Commedia dell’arte?
  • What is the key terminology in Commedia dell-arte?
  • What is physical theatre?
  • What is a stock situation?
  • What are the different types of Commedia characters?
  • What is improvisation?
  • How are masks used in Commedia dell’arte?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall voice and physical drama terminology confidently
  • Be able to create a Commedia dell’arte character by using voice and physical techniques
  • Be able to use Commedia dell’arte techniques including improvisation, masks, physical theatre and stock situations to create a piece of theatre.
  • Be able to recall the keywords used in Commedia dell’arte drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on their work via self-assessment

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

Link to assessment

All summative task investigate how actors Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

  • C: Creating/Performing: Students will perform as an ensemble
  • D: Evaluating: Students will evaluate their performance, reflecting on their skill development

Links to prior learning

Throughout the year students have been working on their vocal and physical skills to perform and devise short pieces based on a variety of techniques and emotions. Students will be creating a longer and more technical piece of theatre but by drawing upon previous techniques.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a pantomime?
  • What is the origin of pantomime?
  • What is the key terminology used in pantomime?
  • What do you recall about physical theatre?
  • What do you recall about stock storylines/characters?
  • How do you create melodrama situations?
  • How is music used in the theatre?
  • How do you demonstrate vocal and physical skills learned throughout the modules?
  • Why is it important to understand and demonstrate how to develop one’s own and others’ work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to develop knowledge of the pantomime genre
  • Be able to understand the main features of pantomime
  • Be able to explore the acting style used in pantomime
  • Be able to create stock characters typical of pantomime
  • Be able to create Melodrama situations typical of pantomime
  • Be able to understand stereotypes in drama
  • Be able to understand the role of music in the theatre
  • Be able to develop our understanding of the role of the audience
  • Be able to reflect on students work via self-assessment and peer-assessment

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The form of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how forms of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

  • Criterion A: Understanding what the features of the genre is by exploring a range of performances and analysing the skills used
  • Criterion B: Understanding what skills they will need in order to create a piece for performance

Links to prior learning

In Year 7 students were focusing on the basics of physical and vocal skills and being able to create characters through those devices.
In advertising, students will develop these skills as well as focus more on their performance skills such as stage presence, body language, eye contact, etc.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the main vocal and physical skills used in drama?
  • How do actor presenters use their vocal skills to sell or persuade in an advert?
  • How do actor presenters use their physical skills to sell or persuade in an advert?
  • What are the types of ways adverts persuade their audiences?
  • How do adverts use bribery, trickery, flattery, guilt and irritation to be memorable and draw audiences in?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to adapt vocal and physical skills according to the character/presenter in the advert
  • Be able to understand how language and imagery is used to persuade and manipulate
  • Be able to understand and demonstrate how to develop own and others’ work
  • Be able to assess own work and work of others

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

Link to assessment

All summative tasks explore how representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

  • Goal: A theatre magazine “To be or not to be” has asked you to help them to write a feature to develop theatre enthusiasts’ understanding of the play “Noughts and Crosses” and the skills that represent society and how they can express themselves.
  • Role: A young theatre journalist
  • Audience: theatre enthusiasts
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and creating your finalised performance
    • Product/Performance/Purpose: Create an information pack
    • Investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your Style/Genre performance (B)
    • A completed performance (C), Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about advertising. Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how to read a text and understand how a playwright creates a script, the themes, characters and setting. They would have studied characters in detail as well as the importance of recurring themes in plays.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Malorie Blackman/Sabrina Mahfouz?
  • When was Noughts and Crosses written?
  • What is Noughts and Crosses about?
  • What is the social/historical context around Noughts and Crosses?
  • Who are the main characters in Noughts and Crosses?
  • What are the main themes surrounding Noughts and Crosses?
  • What techniques does Malorie Blackman/Sabrina Mahfouz use in their writing of Noughts and Crosses?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the plot and character of Noughts and Crosses
  • Be able to understand the historical/social context of Noughts and Crosses
  • Be able to demonstrate sound use of control with vocal skills
  • Be able to demonstrate sound use of control with physical skills
  • Be able to convey a convincing and realistic scene from Noughts and Crosses

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Composition can be effective form of communication to reflect human capability and development to an audience

Link to assessment

All summative tasks investigate TV acting styles that communicate human capability and development through the elements of music, then create your own composition that can attempt to do the same to the intended audience

  • Goal : A local theatre company has asked you to help them to develop actors understanding of how Style/Genre in TV acting is used to reflect human capability and development
  • Role: A young theatre producer
  • Audience: young actors
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and creating your finalised performance
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Create an information pack
    • Investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your Style/Genre performance (B)
    • A completed performance (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements through film music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ would have been introduced to the basics of DAW’s in Y7 and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the difference between drama on the stage and screen?
  • What are the different genres you see on the screen?
  • What is Farce?
  • What is slapstick?
  • What different types of comedy do you see on the screen?
  • What are the dramatic characteristics in the horror “spoof” genre?
  • What are the characteristics of a Soap Opera?
  • How are different camera angles used on the screen to build emotion and mark the moment?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to create short devised pieces based on comedy sub-genres – Slapstick and Farce.
  • Be able to create short devised pieces based on “spoof”
  • Be able to create short devised pieces based on soap opera
  • Be able to create your characters based on stock characters
  • Be able to devise a more developed piece from a genre and use camera angles to reflect emotions for screen

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

Link to assessment

All summative task investigate how musicians Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

  • C: Creating/Performing: Students will perform as an ensemble
  • D: Evaluating: Students will evaluate their performance, reflecting on their skill development

Links to prior learning

Throughout Y7 and Y8 Students worked developing their vocal and physical skills to portray an array of characters and certain themes.Students will reflect on acting aims/ intentions and will understand audience reaction/ response

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a stimulus?
  • What are the physical drama skills?
  • What is tableau, freeze frame, thought-tracking, cross-cutting and marking the moment?
  • What are vocal drama skills?
  • How can a solo,duet and group devise an effective performance with the use of theatre and acting techniques learned?
  • What are the rules of structuring a piece of theatre?
  • Why is it important to collaborate with others?
  • What is the context of the devised piece?
  • Who is the target audience of the devised piece?
  • What is the setting of the devised piece?
  • Why is it important to research your stimulus?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to come up with creative ideas to a stimulus related to a real life situation in popular culture when creating a performance
  • Be able to create a realistic scene based on a stimulus related to a real life situation in popular culture
  • Be able to use creative skills in order to devise a short realistic scene based on the stimulus
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills in your devised piece
  • Be able to use theatre techniques such as thought-tracking, tableau, marking the moment and cross-cutting to develop your devised piece
  • Be able to improve and modify the performance through self and peer feedback

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The form of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how forms of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

  • Criterion A: Understanding what the features of the genre is by exploring a range of performances and analysing the skills used
  • Criterion B: Understanding what skills they will need in order to create a piece for performance

Links to prior learning

Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how to read a text and understand how a playwright creates a script, the themes, characters and setting. They would have learned some emotive and sensitive subjects and how to portray this in a drama setting.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Mark Wheeler?
  • When was Hard to Swallow written?
  • What is Hard to Swallow about?
  • What is the social/historical context around Hard to Swallow?
  • Who are the main characters in Hard to Swallow?
  • What are the main themes surrounding Hard to Swallow?
  • What techniques does Mark Wheeler use in his writing of Hard to Swallow?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the effects of anorexia and other issues that young people may encounter during adolescence
  • Be able to understand the techniques that Mark Wheeler uses such as direct speech and physical theatre.
  • Be able to devise a performance based on the themes and ideas communicated in the play.
  • Be able to learn how drama can be used to raise people’s awareness of an issue in society.

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

Link to assessment

  • Goal: A theatre magazine “To be or not to be” has asked you to help them to write a feature to develop theatre enthusiasts’ understanding of the play “Blood Brothers” and the skills that represent society and how they can express themselves.
  • Role: A young theatre journalist
  • Audience: theatre enthusiasts
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and creating your finalised performance
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Create an information pack
    • investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your Style/Genre performance (B)
    • A completed performance (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how to read a text and understand how a playwright creates a script, the themes, characters and setting. They would have studied characters in detail as well as the importance of recurring themes in plays.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Willy Russell?
  • When was Blood Brothers written?
  • What is Blood Brothers about?
  • What is the social/historical context around Blood Brothers?
  • Who are the main characters in Blood Brothers?
  • What are the main themes surrounding Blood Brothers?
  • What techniques does Willy Russell use in his writing of Blood Brothers?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the plot and character of Blood Brothers
  • Be able to understand the historical/social context of Blood Brothers
  • Be able to demonstrate competent use of control with vocal skills
  • Be able to demonstrate competent use of control with physical skills
  • Be able to justify characters actions. Pupils will apply one of the theories of Stanislavski.
  • Be able to convey a convincing and realistic scene from Blood Brothers.

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

Link to assessment

Throughout KS3 Students worked on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style by using their physical and vocal skills. Students will reflect on acting aims/ intentions and will understand audience reaction/ response as well as mood and atmosphere.

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is Theatre in Education?
  • What are the physical drama skills?
  • What are vocal drama skills?
  • What is a high impact performance?
  • What is a target audience?
  • How do you create theatre specifically for your target audience?
  • What are the rules of structuring a piece of theatre?
  • Why is it important to collaborate with others?
  • What is the context of the devised piece?
  • What is the setting of the devised piece?
  • What is the moral/outcome/message of the devised piece?
  • Why are Teaching and Learning Objectives important when discussing a tailor-made project with a school or organisation?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To recall, select and communicate knowledge and understanding of drama
  • To generate, explore and develop ideas during the process of development to performance
  • To show understanding of discussion, performance and writing
  • To begin to evaluate the impact of narrative according to the way the performance fits storytelling conventions.
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills in your devised piece
  • Be able to improve and modify the performance through self and peer feedback
  • To work in role to create a character or characters, interpret with creativity and originality; sustain role or character; show an awareness of audience
  • To Specifically, demonstrate their understanding of TIE techniques while developing a performance aimed at primary students

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Musicals and Musical Theatre

Watch
History of Musical Theatre

Listen
All time best musical songs playlist

Modules 3 & 4 – Commedia Dell’Arte

All students can access Digital Theatre via their Google Login to access a variety of plays, musicals, actor/director/designer interviews: https://edu.digitaltheatreplus.com/login

Watch
An introduction to Commedia Dell’Arte

Watch
An introduction to comedy

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Articles on playwrights and directors

Watch
Creating an Ensemble – National Theatre

Listen
National Theatre Podcast

Modules 3 & 4 – Dark Wood Manor

All students can access Digital Theatre via their Google Login to access a variety of plays, musicals, actor/director/designer interviews: https://edu.digitaltheatreplus.com/login

Read
A practical how-to guide of how to perform using Physical Theatre

Watch
An introduction to physical theatre

Watch
An Introduction to Gecko Theatre Company

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Modules 3 & 4 – Theatre Practitioners: How do schools of thought shape Theatre?

Read
A concise introduction to Stanislavsky

Listen
An audio Introduction to Brecht

Watch
Key concepts in the Stanislavsky system

Watch
DNA

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ks4 drama

link to specification

Link to prior learning

By the end of Key Stage 3 students will know how to work effectively in groups and develop their collaborative skills. Students will know the expectations of GCSE Drama and should be identify the 5 key skills in producing and evaluating dramatic performance including: Confidence, Communication, Co-operation, Commitment and Concentration. Students will know how to successfully evaluate peer work.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are drama skills?
  • What are stage positions?
  • What are the different types of stages?
  • What are the different roles and responsibilities in the theatre?
  • What makes a successful performance?
  • How do you rehearse effectively?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to list all the physical skills (direction, pace,gait, control, tension, gesture, facial expression, eye contact, posture) and understand what they mean;
  • Be able to list all the vocal skills (pitch, pace, pause, diction, volume, power, emphasis, accent, articulation) and understand what they mean;
  • Be able to identify and describe different types of stages and stage positions’
  • Be able to identify and describe the the roles and responsibilities of theatre makers.

Link to prior learning

Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how an actor and other theatre makers can create and perform theatre. Students will start to understand how to write in exam conditions using point, evidence and explain in their answer. This is a process they will be familiar with from prior studies in English.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are physical skills?
  • What are vocal skills?
  • How is drama and theatre developed and performed?
  • How can an actor use vocal/physical skills to communicate subtle changes to a character’s emotions?
  • How can an actor communicate their character’s emotions to the audience?
  • How do you answer a live review question under exam conditions?
  • How can you learn lines as part of a scripted performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe how actors use physical skills (direction, pace,gait, control, tension, gesture, facial expression, eye contact, posture);
  • Be able to describe how actors use vocal skills (pitch, pace, pause, diction, volume, power, emphasis, accent, articulation);
  • Be able to analyse and evaluate how actors use physical/vocal skills and how they communicate those skills to an audience;
  • Be able to develop critique and reflection of practical work using drama terminology.

Link to prior learning

  • In Year 9 M3, students would have been introduced to Willy Russell’s Blood Brothers and would be familiar with the plot, context, form, structure, characters, themes and language used.
  • Throughout KS3 students have been used to creating their own devised pieces in a variety of forms such as physical and naturalistic theatre. They would understand how the strategies, mediums and elements can be
    used to aid the devising process and would have began to keep records of their work and be able to assess themselves against a criteria.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Willy Russell?
  • What is Blood Brothers about?
  • What is the historical and social context of Blood Brothers?
  • Who are the main characters in Blood Brothers?
  • How do you create a character using voice and movement?
  • What is a stimulus?
  • How do you respond to a stimulus?
  • How do you evaluate your work effectively?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe the of the social, cultural and historical context in which Blood Brothers is set;
  • Be able to begin to understand the timeline of the Blood Brothers play;
  • Be able to begin to understand the key characters and their interactions;
  • Be able to develop, rehearse and perform in an ensemble performance;
  • Be able to work collaboratively to generate, create, rehearse and develop ideas

Link to prior learning

In KS3 students would have worked on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style. They would have also reflected on acting aims/ intentions as well as have an understanding of audience reaction/ response, mood and atmosphere.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the main themes surrounding Blood Brothers?
  • What techniques does Willy Russell use in his writing of Blood Brothers?
  • What is meant by the terms: form and genre, structure, mood, stage direction, language?
  • How do the roles and responsibilities of theatre makers bring the play to life? and what challenges can theatre makers face?
  • How does the genre of play get conveyed to the audience?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to be introduced to a range of stimuli and select one piece to centre an extended piece of Drama upon.
  • To understand the function of the devising log and explore how to use this to aid with the devising process.

Link to prior learning

In KS3 students would have watched a variety of performances based on physical and naturalistic theatre and answered questioned based on vocal and physical skills that the actors convey to the audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you apply knowledge and understanding when making, performing and responding to drama?
  • How can you explore performance texts, understanding their social, cultural and historical context including the theatrical conventions of the period in which they were created?
  • How can you develop an awareness and understanding of the roles and processes undertaken in contemporary professional theatre practice?
  • How can you understand and implement theatre and drama terminology in written work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To analyse and review a live performance so students can develop their understanding of the set play;
  • To be able to identify key moments within the play in terms of moving the plot forwards;
  • To begin to understand and be able to reflect on their own performance using subject-specific terminology;
  • How to learn lines as part of a scripted performance; to develop, rehearse and perform in an ensemble performance.

Link to prior learning

Throughout KS3 students are exposed to a range of scripts and are assessed on their performance quality and creation of a character. They would be accustomed to assessing themselves against a criteria.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you apply knowledge and understanding when making, performing and responding to drama?
  • How can you explore performance texts, understanding their social, cultural and historical context including the theatrical conventions of the period in which they were created?
  • How can you develop an awareness and understanding of the roles and processes undertaken in contemporary professional theatre practice?
  • How can you understand and implement theatre and drama terminology in written work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To analyse and review a live performance so students can develop their understanding of the set play;
  • To be able to identify key moments within the play in terms of moving the plot forwards;
  • To begin to understand and be able to reflect on their own performance using subject-specific terminology;
  • How to learn lines as part of a scripted performance; to develop, rehearse and perform in an ensemble performance.

Link to prior learning

  • Students will continue towork on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style
  • Students will continue to reflect on acting aims/ intentions
  • Students will continue to understand audience reaction/ response as well as mood and atmosphere
  • Students will understand how to write in exam conditions using point, evidence and explain in their answer.

Link to assessment

  • Mock performances to self/peer assess against criteria
  • Regular short tests and homework exercises on component 1

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you independently research plays and playwrights to develop an understanding of given extracts?
  • How do you annotate scripts to help develop understanding of characterisation, artistic intention and staging?
  • How do you stage the given extracts to suit the artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to select final choice of pieces for the practical examination
  • Be able to work and rehearse all performances independently and with guidance from teacher

Link to prior learning

  • Students will continue to work on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style
  • Students will continue to reflect on acting aims/ intentions
  • Students will continue to understand audience reaction/ response as well as mood and atmosphere
  • Students will understand how to write in exam conditions using point, evidence and explain in their answer.
  • Teach guidance on the three sections of the Devising Log/ take in and mark.

Link to assessment

  • Written exam: 1 hour and 45 minutes, Open book, 80 marks, 40% of GCSE
    Questions
  • Section A: multiple choice (4 marks)
  • Section B: four questions on a given extract from the set play chosen (44 marks)
  • Section C: one question (from a choice) on the work of theatre makers in a single live theatre production (32 marks)”
  • Mock performance to prepare for examiner visit (40 marks)

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you work independently to create a performance?
  • How do you work collaboratively to create a performance?
  • How do you best demonstrate a range of skills through both extracts, whether that is though character development or contrast?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To be able to start working on performance (monologue/duologue), recording final performances as appropriate and performing to the visiting examiner
  • Be able to reflect your performance back in front of class; feedback and target setting

Link to prior learning

  • Students will continue to work on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style
  • Students will continue to reflect on acting aims/ intentions
  • Students will continue to understand audience reaction/ response as well as mood and atmosphere

Link to assessment

  • Performance exam for Component 3 – Examiner visit

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are your acting aims/ intentions?
  • How do you use acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style?
  • How do you deliver your monologue/duologue to receive an audience reaction/ response?
  • How do you create a mood and atmosphere?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Continue to work on performance (monologue/duologue), recording final performances as appropriate and performing to the visiting examiner
  • Be able to reflect your performance back in front of class; feedback and target setting

Link to prior learning

  • Component 1 examination: Understanding Drama.

Link to assessment

  • Component 1 examination: Understanding Drama.
  • Frequent knowledge quizzes, practice questions and an end of unit assessment.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you write Exam questions (Both short and long answers) ?
  • What are the best individually suited revision techniques?
  • How do you improve answers and achieve your best marks?
  • What are examination techniques and the expectations for the exam?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe the theatre skills (physical and vocal)
  • Be confident at answering an exam question and knowing the different types of questions that are in the exam (short response vs long response)

Link to prior learning

Component 1 examination: Understanding Drama.

Link to assessment

  • Component 1 examination: Understanding Drama.
    Written exam: 1 hour and 45 minutes, Open book, 80 marks, 40% of GCSE and Questions
  • Section A: multiple choice (4 marks)
  • Section B: four questions on a given extract from the set play chosen (44 marks)
  • Section C: one question (from a choice) on the work of theatre makers in a single live theatre production (32 marks)

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you write Exam questions (Both short and long answers) ?
  • What are the best individually suited revision techniques?
  • How do you improve answers and achieve your best marks?
  • What are examination techniques and the expectations for the exam?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe the theatre skills (physical and vocal)
  • Be confident at answering an exam question and knowing the different types of questions that are in the exam (short response vs long response)