Religious Education / Studies (RE)

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ks3 religious education (re)

In an increasingly complex world, students should be aware of how they have been shaped. We are shaped by our pasts, learning from others’ experiences.  We are shaped by our location and how society has developed.  We are shaped by our planet. We are shaped by our beliefs and ideas.

Subjects in Individuals and Societies follow sequences of lessons that, through repeated exposure and clear linking, ensure students are able to retain key declarative knowledge and abstract concepts such as monarchy and location. They embed and develop the key procedural skills of the discipline, allowing them to analyse, explain, describe and critically assess.

Lessons in RE explore the impact of broad concepts, such as the nature of God and the role of community, on people of faith – and of no faith – in order to highlight similarities and core understandings that explain who human beings are as people and what motivates them.

Link to prior learning

N/A

Link to assessment

A, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the importance of, and difference between, Fact, Belief and Opinion?
  • How does belief affects the ways believers live?
  • Why is it important to understand different perspectives?
  • What is an Ultimate Question?.
  • What is the difference between a theist, atheist and agnostic?
  • What is a Humanist?
  • What happened in the Christian creation story?
  • What is the Design / Watchmaker Argument?
  • What is the Cosmological Argument?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe religious ideas and give one precise supporting detail.
  • Be able to compare information to describe key features.
  • Be able to explain a religious concept and give one precise supporting detail.
  • Be able to begin forming a judgement.

Link to prior learning

  • Different perspectives.
  • Agnostic, Atheist, Theist.
  • Humanist belief.

Link to assessment

A, B, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do believers experience God?
  • Can God be experienced through miracles?
  • How do Hindus use their senses to experience God?
  • Why do Hindus have many images of God?
  • What are the 99 names of Allah and how do the help Muslims experience God?
  • How do Humanists question and understand the world?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to evaluate the a Biblical story.
  • Be able to write a judgement essay.
  • Be able to explain the significance of religious artefacts.
  • Be able to explain key religious concepts.
  • Be able to explain the difference between the nature of God and Humanity.
  • Be able to explain the importance of experiences and reason.

Link to prior learning

  • How religion affects a believers’ life.
  • The 99 names of Allah.
  • The life of Saul.

Link to assessment

A, B, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the Golden Rule?
  • Can I design an ideal community?
  • How important are rules in a society?
  • How do Christians live their lives in the model of Jesus?
  • How and why do Sikhs help in the community?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to evaluate the impact of the Golden Rule.
  • Be able to identify the key features of a successful community.
  • Be able to explain why religions have rules.
  • Be able to evaluate the impact of a key religious leader.
  • Be able to describe how a religious group tries to have a positive impact in the community.

Link to prior learning

  • The Golden Rule.
  • The Nature of God.
  • The role of religion in communities.

Link to assessment

A, B, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What do people believe happens after death?
  • Which type of people do Christians believe go to Heaven?
  • What do Muslims believe happens to someone when they die?
  • How do people remember the dead?
  • What is Samsara?
  • What is the truth about Near Death Experiences?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain different religious attitudes to mortality and life after death.
  • Be able to evaluate different religious attitudes.
  • Be able to explain the different opinions of a believer and a non-believer.

Link to prior learning

  • Jesus
  • The nature of Allah
  • Hindu worship
  • Samsara
  • The Golden Rule

Link to assessment

A, B, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What makes a good religious leader?
  • Why are prophets important in Islam?
  • Who was Buddha and why did he change his lifestyle so dramatically?
  • Why was Jesus such an influential figure?
  • Why is Khadijah such an important figure in Islam?
  • What makes an inspiring Humanist and what motivates them to do right?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to compare the life, beliefs and influence of leaders from multiple faiths.
  • Be able to assess the influence of key figures in a religion.
  • Be able to evaluate the importance of sacrifice and equality in religion.
  • Be able to form a judgement about the importance of a religious figure on wider society.
  • Be able to consider the role of female leaders in religion.
  • Be able to explain where a Humanist draws inspiration.

Link to prior learning

  • The Golden Rule
  • Samsara
  • Religious beliefs about the creation of the earth and humanity.

Link to assessment

A and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How has the planet been affected by pollution and climate change?
  • What are the differing religious responses to how humans should look after the planet.
  • How have humans treated and exploited animals on earth?
  • How can humans improve their environment?
  • How do different religions view crime, punishment, suffering and evil?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain environmental damage to the earth.
  • Be able to compare the concepts of stewardship of the earth and utilising the earth.
  • Be able to evaluate humanity’s role in looking after animals.
  • Be able to write persuasively to create political change on a key issue.
  • Be able to explain how Christians respond to the issues of crime, evil and suffering.

Link to prior learning

  • The Christian Creation story
  • Jesus as a religious leader
  • The Christian qualities of God.
  • Hindu beliefs about God.
  • Hindu beliefs about reincarnation
  • The story of Muhammed and Ibrahim
  • Muslim afterlife.
  • Islamic prophets.

Link to assessment

A, B, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the three elements of the Holy Trinity?
  • What are the qualities of G-d in Judaism?
  • What is the nature of God in Sikhism?
  • Who was Guru Nanak?
  • What are the five Ks?
  • Which three gods make up the Hindu Trimurti?
  • What does the symbol Om represent?
  • What do Muslims think are some of the qualities of Allah?
  • How do the qualities of Allah affect the ways Muslims live their lives?
  • What is the difference between immanent and transcendent?
  • What is the Tawhid?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the significance of the Holy Trinity and give one supporting detail.
  • Be able to begin forming a judgement about the qualities of G-d.
  • Be able to embed quotations from a source of wisdom or authority into written responses.
  • Be able to identify similarities and differences between religions.

Link to prior learning

  • Christianity and Jesus
  • Muhammad and the 99 Names of Allah
  • Islamic Prophets
  • The concept of the Almighty in Judaism
  • How belief impacts the actions of a believer.

Link to assessment

A, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the key elements of Judaism?
  • What happened to Abraham and why is he so important to Jews today?
  • What links the Abrahamic religions?
  • What is the Torah?
  • What is the Talmud?
  • How do religious texts impact of the lives of Jewish people today?
  • Why is Hanukkah significant to Jews today?
  • Why is Jerusalem so important to the Jewish people?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain how the Torah affects the daily life of Jews.
  • Be able to explain the significance of Abraham for Jewish people.
  • Be able to evaluate how the example of Abraham influences members of the Abrahamic religions.
  • Be able to explain how a religious Jew would react in certain daily situations and the inspiration they can draw from scripture.
  • Be able to explain the symbolism of light in the Hanukkah story.
  • Be able to explain the key features of the Jewish relationship with Jerusalem over time.

Link to prior learning

  • The Golden Rule
  • The influence of Jesus
  • The nature of Allah
  • The life of Buddha
  • Ahimsa

Link to assessment

A, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

Key religious individuals:

  • What challenges did they face?
  • How did they draw inspiration from their religion?
  • What was the outcome of their situation?
  • What lessons could we draw from their life?
  • Martin Luther King Jr.
  • Malcolm X.
  • Gandhi
  • The Dalai Lama

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the key features of the individuals life.
  • Be able to state facts about that challenges that they faced.
  • Be able to explain the impact that they made on their community.

Link to prior learning

  • The Golden Rule
  • The Bible as a Source of Authority
  • Impact of Civil Rights leaders; non-violent vs. violent protest
  • The impact of Jesus’ life
  • The evolution of Christianity as a Jewish sect.
  • The importance of Jerusalem for Christians, Jews and Muslims.

Link to assessment

A, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the four types of Christian love?
  • How can a Christian express agape love?
  • What is the story of the Good Samaritan?
  • What do Christians mean when they say ‘love your enemy’?
  • What is the story of Zacchaeus?
  • What are situation ethics?
  • What does ‘an eye for an eye’ mean in reality?
  • What happened in the last week of Jesus’ life?
  • Why was Jesus crucified?
  • What happened after Jesus’ death?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain Jesus’ teaching of love using examples from scripture.
  • Be able to evaluate who Christians should show love to.
  • Be able to evaluate how lived experiences impact Christian love for others.
  • Be able to apply situation ethics to a number of different examples.
  • Be able to explain the events surrounding Jesus’ trial.
  • Be able to evaluate the differing accounts of Jesus’ death and resurrection.
  • Be able to explain why this is a significant event for Christians.

Link to prior learning

  • Nature of Allah
  • Islamic Prophets
  • Angel Jibril
  • Khadijah
  • Night of Power
  • The BIble
  • The Torah

Link to assessment

A, B, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the key elements of Islam?
  • Who was Muhammad and why is he so important to Muslims today?
  • What links the Abrahamic religions?
  • What is the Qur’an?
  • What the Hadith and Sunnah?
  • How do religious texts and teachings impact the lives of Muslims today?
  • Why is Ramadan significant to Muslims today?
  • Why is Mecca so important to Muslims?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain how the Qur’an affects the daily life of Jews.
  • Be able to explain the significance of Muhammad for Muslims.
  • Be able to evaluate how the example of Abraham influences members of the Abrahamic religions.
  • Be able to explain how a Muslim would react in certain daily situations and the inspiration they can draw from scripture.
  • Be able to explain the purpose of fasting during Ramadan.
  • Be able to explain the key features of the Muslim relationship with Makkah over time.

Link to prior learning

  • The Last Supper
  • Creation story in Christianity.
  • The Crucifiction.
  • Christian belief in the afterlife.
  • Jewish worship
  • Islamic worship
  • The Wailing Wall and Temple Mount
  • The Adhan (call to Prayer).

Link to assessment

A and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How is spirituality expressed through Fine Art?
  • What was the Renaissance?
  • How do Pentecostalists express themselves through music?
  • Are some films religious allegories?
  • How do modern artists express their beliefs?
  • How do religious artists express themselves through religion?
  • How have religious stories been depicted in film over time?
  • Why has religion impacted censorship laws?
  • How do religious buildings reflect their purpose and specific religion?
  • Are decorative buildings a waste of time and money for organised religions?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify the message of religious paintings.
  • Be able to explain why religion and the arts are so closely related.
  • Be able to justify the meaning of artworks by modern and Renaissance artists.
  • Be able to explain the impact of religious music on believers and non-believers.
  • Be able to evaluate the usefulness of using film to convey religious themes and ideas.
  • Be able to assess the features of religious buildings.
  • Be able to explain the relationship between form and function in religious architecture.

Link to prior learning

  • The Trinity
  • The life of Jesus
  • The Golden Rule
  • Situational Ethics
  • Humanism, Atheism and Agnosticism
  • How religion affects the lives of believers.

Link to assessment

A, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the importance of marriage to Christians?
  • What is religious marriage?
  • Why is marriage important to society?
  • What are some non-religious views on marriage?
  • What is contraception and what are the Christian views on it?
  • Why do some people choose to use contraception?
  • What is a sacrament?
  • How do Catholics and Protestants disagree on divorce?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to outline reasons why a person might get married.
  • Be able to explain two reasons why marriage is important and give two supporting details.
  • Be able to write about different views on marriage.
  • Be able to identify two Christian views on contraception and give two supporting details.
  • Be able to support your statements about contraception with an embedded quotation from a source of wisdom and authority (the Bible).
  • Be able to explain two differences between different religions and give two supporting details.

Link to prior learning

  • Marriage.
  • Divorce.
  • Biblical attitudes to the family.
  • The Golden Rule
  • The Climate Crisis, pollution, animal welfare, sustainability.

Link to assessment

A, B, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the role of sexual relationships in religion?
  • Why do some people dedicate themselves to chastity before marriage?
  • What do Christians think about LGBT+ people?
  • What does the Bible say about LGBT+ people?
  • Does the Church need to update its teaching about LGBT+ and be more accepting?
  • What are Christian, Muslim and Jewish attitudes to giving to charity and paying taxes?
  • How are taxes collected and distributed in Britain?
  • What actions should religious people help to tackle poverty?
  • How should the earth be treated – exploited, conserved, or maintained?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to outline the role of sexual relationships and the importance of marriage.
  • Be able to evaluate Christian attitudes to LGBT+ people.
  • Be able to compare religious and non-religious attitudes to taxation, charity and poverty.
  • Be able to explain the concepts of stewardship and dominion.

Link to prior learning

  • Fate
  • Omnipotence
  • Omnibenevolence
  • Omnipotent
  • 99 Names of Allah
  • The Almighty in Judaism

Link to assessment

A, B, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is free will?
  • What is determinism?
  • What are Christian and non-religious views on lying?
  • What is the ‘Sanctity of Life’?
  • Is capital punishment ever acceptable?
  • What are religious and non-religious attitudes to abortion?
  • What is ‘Just War’?
  • What are religious attitudes to refuges?
  • What are the different non-religious attitudes to refugees?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the key features of free will and determinism.
  • Be able to evaluate differing attitudes to lying.
  • Be able to explain why the Sanctity of Life is important to Christians today.
    Be able to make a judgement about the acceptability of Capital Punishment.
  • Be able to explain two Christian views about abortion.
  • Be able to explain two ways in which the theory of Just War should be updated.
  • Be able to make a judgement about how refugees should be treated.

Link to prior learning

  • Guru Gobind Singh
  • Khalsa
  • 5 Ks
  • Samsara
  • Ahimsa

Link to assessment

A, B, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the nature of God in Sikhism and who was Guru Nanak?
  • How does being a Sikh affect the life of a believer?
  • What are the key elements of Sikh worship?
  • Why is the Golden Temple so important in Sikhism?
  • What is it like being a Sikh in Britain?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the key features of God in Sikhism.
  • Be able to evaluate the life of Guru Nanak.
  • Be able to state the key ways that being a Sikh affect believers.
  • Be able to explain the key elements of Sikh worship and relate them to a Source of Authority.
  • Be able to assess the role that the the Golden Temple plays in Sikhism.
  • Be able to form a judgement about the ways that Sikhs contribute to life in Britain.

Link to prior learning

  • Brahman
  • Vishnu
  • Shiva
  • Puja
  • Samsara
  • Ahimsa

Link to assessment

A, B, C, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the nature of God in Hinduism and who is Brahman?
  • How does being a Hindu affect the life of a believer?
  • What are the key elements of Hindu worship?
  • Why is Varanasi so important in Sikhism?
  • What is it like being a Hindu in Britain?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the key features of God in Hinduism.
  • Be able to evaluate the nature of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva.
  • Be able to state the key ways that being a Hindu affect believers.
  • Be able to explain the key elements of HIndu worship and relate them to a Source of Authority.
  • Be able to assess the role that Varanasi plays in Hinduism.
  • Be able to form a judgement about the ways that Hindus contribute to life in Britain.

Link to prior learning

  • The Life of Buddha
  • Moksha
  • Samsara
  • Ahimsa

Link to assessment

A, B, D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the nature of God in Buddhism and who was Buddha?
  • How does being a Buddhist affect the life of a believer?
  • What are the key elements of Buddhist worship?
  • Why is Bodh Gaya so important in Buddhism?
  • What is it like being a Buddhist in Britain?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the key features of God in Buddhism.
  • Be able to evaluate the life of the Buddha.
  • Be able to state the key ways that being a Buddhist affect believers.
  • Be able to explain the key elements of Buddhist worship and relate them to a Source of Authority.
  • Be able to assess the role that Bodh Gaya plays in Buddhism.
  • Be able to form a judgement about the ways that Buddhists contribute to life in Britain.

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
What is religion?

Module 3

Read
Abraham and Ibrahim

Module 4

Read
Miracles – A Humanist Perspective

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
The nature of God in Christianity

Module 3

Read
Explore the Neasden (Hindu) Mandir

Module 4

Read
How did religion motivate Martin Luther King Jr.?

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Weddings in Christianity

Module 3

Read
The Role of Churches in the Community – Charity

Module 4

Read
Religious Refugees

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ks4 religious education (core)

Link to prior learning

  • References to the nature of God in from KS3
  • References to the expereicence of being a worshipper in Britain today
  • Particularyly Easter and the Eucharist
  • The importance of the scripture as a source of wisdom and authority and a guide for living
  • Reference to biblical quotes

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The Trinity: the nature and significance of the Trinity as expressed in the Nicene Creed; the nature and significance of the oneness of God; the nature and significance of each of the Persons individually: including reference to Matthew 3:13–17; how this is reflected in Christian worship and belief today.
  • The creation of the universe and of humanity: the biblical account of creation and divergent ways in which it may be understood by Christians, including as literal and metaphorical; the role of the Word and Spirit in creation including John 1:1–18 and Genesis 1–3; the importance of creation for Christians today.
  • The Incarnation: the nature and importance of the person of Jesus Christ as the incarnate Son of God; the biblical basis of this teaching, including John 1:1–18 and 1 Timothy 3: 16 and its significance for Christians today.
  • The last days of Jesus’ life: the Last Supper, betrayal, arrest, trial, crucifixion, resurrection and ascension of Jesus; the accounts of these within the Bible, including Luke 22–24 and the significance of these events to understanding the person of Jesus Christ.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine what is meant by the Trinity, be able to provide examples of how the Trinity is shown in the Nicene Creed.
  • Examine the nature and significance of each of the Persons individually including reference to Matthew 3:13-17.
  • Explore how the Trinity is shown in worship, liturgical and non-liturgical.
  • Discuss and analyse why the Trinity is important to Christians and how this is reflected in Christian worship and belief today.
  • Examine the biblical creation and how it is shown in the Old Testament (Genesis 1-3) and in the New Testament (John 1:1-18).
  • Explore why the biblical creation is important to Christians today, including stewardship.
  • Discuss and analyse the divergent ways in which the biblical creation may be understood by Christians, including as literal and metaphporical.
  • Examine the concept of the incarnation of God as Jesus including references to John 1:1-18 and 1 Timothy 3:16.
  • Discuss and analyse why the incarnation is important to Christians.
  • Explore how the incarnation is reflected in the litergical year.
  • Examine the relevance of the last days of Jesus’ life to his whole life and to the fulfilment of Old Testament prophecy.
  • Explore the Gospel descriptions from the Last Supper preparations to the ascension, including Luke 22-24.
  • Explore why the events in the last days of the life of Jesus are important for Christians today, the significance of these events to understanding the person of Jesus Christ and how they are remembered in liturgical celebrations today.

Link to prior learning

  • References to understanding of the crucifixion.
  • References to Christians and non-religious attitudes to marriage, contraception and situational ethics.
  • Reference to gender equality in modern British society.
  • Reference to the Six Beliefs and Five Pillars.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The nature and significance of salvation and the role of Christ within salvation: law, sin, grace and Spirit, the role of Christ in salvation, including John 3:10–21 and Acts 4:8–12; the nature and significance of atonement within Christianity and its link to salvation.
  • Christian eschatology: divergent Christian teachings about life after death, including the nature and significance of resurrection, judgment, heaven, and hell and purgatory, with reference to the 39 Articles of Religion and Catholic teachings; how beliefs about life after death are shown in the Bible, including reference to 2 Corinthians 5:1–10 and divergent understandings as to why they are important for Christians today.
  • The problem of evil/suffering and a loving and righteous God: the problems it raises for Christians about the nature of God, including reference to omnipotence and benevolence, including Psalm 103; how the problem may cause believers to question their faith or the existence of God; the nature and examples of natural suffering, moral suffering.
  • Divergent solutions offered to the problem of evil/suffering and a loving and righteous God: biblical, theoretical and practical, including reference to Psalm 119, Job, free will, vale of soul-making, prayer, and charity; the success of solutions to the problem.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine the concepts of atonement, law, sin, grace and Spirit and how Jesus brings these, including John 3:10-21 and Acts 4:8-12.
  • Explore what the nature and significance of atonement within Christianity.
  • Examine why atonement is needed is needed by Christians today, especially with regard to salvation.
  • Examine the concept of eschatology with regard to Christian ideas of what it might mean.
  • Explore divergent Christian teachings about life after death, include references to life after death as described in the 39 Articles of Religion and Catholic teachings and 2 Corinthians 5:1-10.
  • Discuss and analyse the divergent understandings as to why belief in life after death is important for Christians today. Compare and contrast beliefs about the afterlife and their significance within Christianity and one of the main religions practiced in Great Britain.
  • Examine the concepts of evil and suffering, moral suffering and natural suffering be able to describe them and be able to give examples of them and the problems they cause, with reference to Psalm 103.
  • Examine what the problem of evil and suffering is, including the contradiction to the characteristics of God as loving, powerful and righteous (inconsistent triad).
  • Discuss and analyse why this might lead some people to question their belief in God. Examine the divergent solutions offered to the problem of evil: in the Bible examine Psalm 119 and Job.
  • Explore Christian responses to the problem both theoretical such as the free-will argument, the idea of a vale of soul-making and practical such as prayer and charity work, be able to provide examples of these responses and who might use them.
  • Discuss and analyse the varying success of these responses together with the idea that there can never be a solution to the problem.

Link to prior learning

  • The Trinity
  • The Last Days of Jesus
  • The role of Jesus as an example
  • The importance of the atonement
  • The Parable of the sheep and the goats

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Christian worship: liturgical and non-liturgical forms of worship, including activities which are informal and individual, including reference to the Book of Common Prayer; when each form might be used and why; divergent Christian attitudes towards the practices, meaning and significance of liturgical and non-liturgical forms of worship in Christian life today, with reference to denominations which worship with less structure, such as some Pentecostal churches.
  • The role of the sacraments in Christian life and their practice in two denominations: the role of the sacraments/ordinance as a whole; the nature and importance of the meaning and celebration of baptism and the Eucharist in at least two denominations, including reference to the 39 Articles XXV-XXXVI; divergent Christian attitudes towards the use and number of sacraments in Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant traditions.
  • The nature and purpose of prayer: the nature of and examples of the different types of prayer; set prayers; informal prayer and the Lord’s Prayer including Matthew 6:5–14; when each type might be used and why; divergent Christian attitudes towards the importance of each type of prayer for Christians today.
  • Pilgrimage: the nature, history and purpose of pilgrimage, including interpretations of Luke 2:41–43; the significance of the places people go on pilgrimage; divergent Christian teachings about whether pilgrimage is important for Christians today, with specific reference to Catholic and Protestant understandings; the activities associated with, and significance of, Jerusalem, Iona, Taize and Walsingham.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine the nature of Christian worship (individual, informal and liturgical) including reference to the Book of Common Prayer.
  • Explore why Christians worship in different ways and the importance of the different types of worship, be able to give examples of each of the different types of worship.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes towards worship and why it is important to have a variety of types of worship for Christians with reference to denominations which worship with less structure, such as some Pentecostal churches.
  • Compare and contrast the practice and significance of worship within Christianity and one of the main religions (Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism or Sikhism) practiced in Great Britain.
  • Examine the nature of sacraments, know why different Christians have different views about sacraments and celebrate sacraments in different ways.
  • Explore the biblical history and the importance of Baptism today, know how and why it may be celebrated (infant and adult).
  • Explore the biblical history and the importance of the Eucharist today, know how and why it may be celebrated with reference to the 39 Articles XXV-XXXVI.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes towards the use and number of sacraments in Orthodox, Catholic and Protestant traditions.
  • Examine the nature of the different types of prayer, set (formulaic) and informal (extempore).
  • Explore why Christians pray in different ways and the importance of the different types of prayer, be able to give examples of each of the different types of prayer.
  • Examine the Lord’s Prayer in detail, understand its history, including Matthew 6:5-14 and the importance of the prayer for Christians today.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes towards the importance of each type of prayer for Christians today.
  • Examine the nature and purpose of pilgrimage in Christianity with reference to Luke 2:41-43.
  • Explore the history of pilgrimage, Church teachings about pilgrimage and explain why pilgrimage is important for Christians today.
  • Examine in detail places of Christian pilgrimage: a historical pilgrimage site – Jerusalem, ecumenical pilgrimage sites – Iona and Taize and a Marian site – Walsingham, know why Christians go on pilgrimage to these places and what they do there.
  • Discuss and analyse the divergent Christian teachings about whether pilgrimage is important to Christians today.

Link to prior learning

  • The Trinity
  • The incarnation
  • The role of Jesus as an example
  • The importance of the salvation
  • The good samaritan (KS3)

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Christian religious celebrations: the nature and history of Christian festivals in the church year, including Christmas and Easter; the significance of celebrating Advent and Christmas; the significance of celebrating Holy Week and Easter, with reference to interpretations of 1 Corinthians 15:12–34.
  • The future of the Christian Church: Church growth, the history and purpose of missionary and evangelical work including reference to Mark 16:9–20; divergent ways this is put into practice by the Church locally, nationally and globally; Christian attitudes to why evangelical work is important for the Church and for individual Christians.
  • The role and importance of the local church in the local community: how and why it helps the individual believer and the local area; local parish activities, including interpretations of 1 Peter 5:1–4, ecumenism, outreach work, the centre of Christian identity and worship through living practices.
  • The role and importance of the Church in the worldwide community: how and why it works for reconciliation and the problems faced by the persecuted Church; divergent Christian responses to teachings about charity, including 1 Corinthians 13 and Matthew 25:31–46; the work of Christian Aid, what it does and why.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine the nature of Christian religious celebrations of Christmas and Easter.
  • Explore the history and the importance of Advent and Christmas today, know how and why it may be celebrated.
  • Explore the biblical history and the importance of Lent, Holy Week and Easter today, know how and why it may be celebrated with reference to the interpretations of Corinthians 15:12-34.
  • Discuss and analyse why Celebrations of Christmas and Easter are important to Christians.
  • Examine the future of the Church; what its role will be in the future, how it will grow.
  • Explain the nature, history and purpose of missionary and evangelical work including reference to Mark 16:9-20 and the divergent ways this is put into practice by the Church locally, nationally and globally.
  • Discuss and analyse Christian attitudes towards missionary and evangelical work and why it is important both for the Church and for individuals.
  • Examine the role and importance of the local (parish) church. Explore the different roles that a church (parish) has, especially as a focus of identity and a place of worship and why there is a need for the role including interpretations of 1 Peter 5:1-4.
  • Explore how the activities of the church might be important to the individual, the local area and the diocese.
  • Discuss and analyse the importance of the local church for Christians.
  • Examine the role and importance of the Church in the worldwide community.
  • Explore the different roles that the worldwide Church has, especially as a force for reconciliation and harmony and the problems it faces as a persecuted Church.
  • Explore the charitable activities of the Church, know how and why they do them, including divergent Christian responses to teaching about charity with reference to 1 Corinthians 13 and Matthew 25: 31-46.
  • Examine the work of Christian Aid, know what they do and why.

Link to prior learning

  • References to Christians and non-religious attitudes to marriage, contraception and situational ethics
  • Reference to gender equality in modern British society
  • Reference to the 10 commandments: Adultary

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The importance and purpose of marriage for Christians: Christian teachings about the significance of marriage in Christian life; the purpose of marriage for Christians including Mark 10:6–9; divergent Christian and non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to the importance of marriage in society; including the sanctity of marriage, a lack of importance, cohabitation and Christian responses to these attitudes.
  • Christian teachings about the nature and importance of sexual relationships: divergent Christian teachings about sexual relationships; Christian attitudes towards sexual relationships outside of marriage and homosexuality, including interpretations of 1 Corinthians 6:7–20; divergent Christian and non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to sexual relationships, including the acceptance of sexual relationships outside marriage and homosexuality and Christian responses to them.
  • Christian teachings about the purpose and importance of the family including: procreation, security and education of children, with reference to Ephesians 6:1–4; divergent Christian responses to different types of family within 21st-century society (nuclear, single parent, same-sex parents, extended and blended families).
  • Support for the family in the local parish: how and why the local church community tries to support families, including through family worship, including interpretations of Matthew 19:13–14, rites of passage, classes for parents, groups for children, including Sunday schools and counselling; the importance of the support of the local parish for Christians today.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine the nature, purpose and importance of marriage for Christians including Mark 10:6-9.
  • Explore why marriage is seen as important by both Christians and society.
  • Discuss and analyse different attitudes (including atheist and Humanist) to marriage and cohabitation including why some people might question the importance of marriage and the Christian responses to them.
  • Examine Christian teachings about the nature and importance of the different types of sexual relationships including reference to homosexuality and sex outside marriage, including 1 Corinthians 6:7-20.
  • Explore the nature and importance of the different types of sexual relationships including homosexuality and sex outside marriage and the way attitudes towards them have changed in the last century.
  • Discuss and analyse different attitudes to sexual relationships including the acceptance of homosexuality and sex outside marriage, including those of Humanists and atheists and the Christian responses to them.
  • Examine Christian teachings about the nature, purpose and importance of the family, including reference to procreation and importance to the security and education of children with reference to Ephesians 6:1-4.
  • Explore the different types of family and the way that family types have changed over the last century, know examples of the different types and the advantages and disadvantages of each type.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes to the different types of family within 21st century society.
  • Examine the ways that the Christian community encourages family life, including how and why the local church community works to support families, including interpretations of Matthew 19:13-14.
  • Discuss and analyse the reasons why these ways might help and why they are important to both the family and to the Christian community.

Link to prior learning

  • References to Christians and non-religious attitudes to marriage, contraception and situational ethics
  • Reference to gender equality in modern British society
  • Reference to the 10 commandments: Adultary/ Kill
  • Reference to the sanctity of life

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Christian teaching about family planning and regulation of births: divergent Christian attitudes about contraception and family planning, including teachings about the artificial methods of contraception by some Protestant Churches and the Catholic Church, with reference to Humanae Vitae; different non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to family planning and the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and Christian responses to them.
  • Christian teachings and attitudes towards divorce and remarriage: Christian teachings about divorce and remarriage, including Matthew 19:1–12; divergent Christian, non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to divorce and remarriage, including the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and Christian responses to them.
  • Christian teaching about the equality of men and women in the family: Christian teachings and attitudes about the role of men and women in the family, including reference to Genesis 1–3 and Ephesians 5:21–30; divergent Christian attitudes about the equality and role of men and women in the family and Christian responses to them.
  • Christian teachings about gender prejudice and discrimination: Christian opposition to gender prejudice and discrimination, including Galatians 3:23–29; examples of Christian opposition to gender prejudice and discrimination; divergent Christian attitudes to gender differences, including the role of women in the Church, prejudice and discrimination and Christian responses to them.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine Christian attitudes and teachings about the different types of contraception and family planning, including teachings about the artificial methods of contraception by some Protestant Churches and the Catholic Church with reference to Humanae Vitae.
  • Explore the nature and purpose of contraception, the different types and how they function, including the advantages and disadvantages of the different types of contraception.
  • Discuss and analyse different non-religious (including Humanist and atheist) attitudes to family planning and the application of ethical theories such as situation ethics and the Christian responses to them.
  • Examine the different Christian attitudes and teachings about divorce and remarriage, including Matthew 19:1-12.
  • Explore the nature and purpose of divorce and re-marriage, including the UK law on divorce.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian, non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes to divorce and re-marriage including the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and the Christian responses to them.
  • Examine Christian beliefs, teachings and attitudes towards the role of men and women within the family.
  • Explore the role of men and women as shown in the scriptures including Genesis 1-3 and Ephesians 5:21-30.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes about the equality and role of men and women within the family and the Christian responses to them.
  • Examine Christian teachings about gender prejudice and discrimination and how Christians show gender quality.
  • Explore examples of Christian opposition to gender prejudice and discrimination, including Galatians 3:23-29.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes to gender differences including the role of women in the Church, prejudice and discrimination and the Christian responses to them.

Link to prior learning

  • Reference to British law.
  • Reference to suffering, death penalty and treatment of people as taught at KS3.
  • Reference to Humanist attitudes to the treatment of prisioners and punishment.
  • Reference to the God as a judge.
  • Reference to the 10 commandments and the Beattitudes.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Christian attitudes towards justice: the nature of justice and why justice is important for Christians, including Micah 3 and 6; Christian responses to why justice is important for victims; non-religious attitudes (including atheist and Humanist) about why justice is important, regardless of religion and belief, and Christian responses to these attitudes.
  • Christian attitudes towards crime; Christian teachings and responses to the nature, causes and problem of crime; Christian teachings about crime, including John 8:1–11; what action is taken by Christian individuals and Christian groups to end crime, including Prison Fellowship and Street Pastors.
  • Christian attitudes towards crime; Christian teachings and responses to the nature, causes and problem of crime; Christian teachings about crime, including John 8:1–11; what action is taken by Christian individuals and Christian groups to end crime, including Prison Fellowship and Street Pastors.
  • Christian attitudes towards punishment: the nature of punishment; divergent Christian attitudes towards the use of punishment, the nature and meaning of biblical teachings about punishment, including Luke 12:35–48; Christian teachings on why punishment can be regarded as justice and why punishment might be needed in society.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine the nature of crime and justice and Christian attitudes towards it.
  • Explore Christian teachings about justice e.g. Micah 3 and 6.
  • Discuss and analyse the importance of justice in society, for Christians and for the victims of crime and non-religious attitudes (including atheist and Humanist) about why justice is important, regardless of religion and Christian responses to these attitudes.
  • Examine Christian attitudes, teachings and responses to crime and the nature, causes and problem of crime, including John 8:1-11.
  • Discuss and analyse the motivation for and importance of the actions of Christians who have helped reduce crime, including a study of the Prison Fellowship and Street Pastors.
  • Examine Christian teachings about the nature of good and evil actions and reward and suffering as the consequences of both.
  • Explore non-religious attitudes (including atheist and Humanist) about why people suffer, including believing in religion and Christian responses to them.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian teachings about why people suffer including a study of how reward and punishment is shown in response to actions in the Parable of the Sheep and the Goats (Matthew 25:31-46).
  • Examine the nature of punishment.
  • Explore divergent Christian attitudes towards the use of punishment, the nature and meaning of biblical teaching about punishment including Luke 12:35-48.
  • Discuss and analyse Christian teachings on why punishment can be regarded as justice and why punishment might be needed in society.

Link to prior learning

  • References to Jewish scripture and the importance of Moses.
  • Reference to the nature of the Almighty.
  • Reference to the Shema.
  • Reference to the differing beliefs of liberal and Orthodox Christians – also similarities / differences with Christianity.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Christian attitudes towards the aims of punishment: Christian attitudes towards each of the aims of punishment (protection, retribution, deterrence and reformation); the nature and meaning of biblical examples of teaching about punishment, including Galatians 6:1–10.
  • Christian teachings about forgiveness: Christian teachings and responses to the nature of forgiveness and biblical teachings about it; how offenders are forgiven by the community and why this is needed; Christian teachings about the nature of restorative justice, examples of its use by Christian organisations and why it is important for criminals, including Matthew 5:21–26.
  • Christian teachings about the treatment of criminals: biblical teachings about the treatment of criminals, including Proverbs 31:8–9; divergent Christian attitudes towards the use of torture, human rights, fair trial, trial by jury, including the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, which may accept the use of torture if it is for the greater good.
  • Christian attitudes towards the death penalty: the nature and purpose of capital punishment; divergent Christian teachings about capital punishment, including interpretations of Genesis 9:6, Exodus 21:8–13 and Matthew 5:38–48; non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes towards the use of capital punishment, including the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and Christian responses to them.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine the Christian attitudes to the aims of punishment.
  • Explore the role of punishment in society and the strengths and weaknesses of different aims of punishment (protection, retribution, deterrence and reformation).
  • Discuss and analyse Christian attitudes towards the use of punishment, including references to the use of punishment in the Bible especially Galatians 6:1-10.
  • Examine Christian teachings and responses to the nature of forgiveness and biblical teachings about it.
  • Discuss and analyse the importance of forgiveness for Christians and in society, be able to give examples of how offenders are forgiven by the community and why it is important. 
  • Explore Christian teachings about the nature of restorative justice using examples of its use by Christian organisations and why it is important for criminals, including Matthew 5:21-26.
  • Examine issues raised by Christian and biblical teachings about the treatment of criminals, such as fair treatment, human rights, the use of torture and trials, including Proverbs 31:8-9.
  • Explain the nature of each of the issues and why they raise problems in society.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian attitudes, including the application of ethical theories such as situation ethics, towards the treatment of criminals, which may accept the use of torture if it is for the greater good.
  • Examine the nature and purpose of capital punishment, be able to provide examples of its use.
  • Explore divergent Christian teachings about the advantages and disadvantages of capital punishment, including interpretations of Genesis 9:6; Exodus 21:9-13 and Matthew 5:38-48.
  • Discuss and analyse the non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes towards the use of capital punishment, including the application of ethical theories, such as situation ethics, and Christian responses to them.

Link to prior learning

  • Reference to Sanctity of Life
  • Reference to the 10 commandments
  • Reference to the beatittudes
  • Reference to conflict taught at KS3
  • Reference to UN
  • Aquinas and Just War Theory

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The role of Christians in peace making: Christian teachings about peace making; the importance of justice, forgiveness and reconciliation for Christians in peace making; the work of one Christian group working for peace today, what it does and why it tries to work for peace, including Matthew 5:1–16.
  • Christian attitudes to conflict: Christian teachings and responses to the nature and causes of conflict; Christian responses to the problems conflict causes, including Matthew 26:47–56 and links to situation ethics; non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes about the role of religion in the causes of conflict and Christian responses to them.
  • Christian attitudes to pacifism: divergent Christian teachings and responses to the nature and history of pacifism, including reference to Quakers; divergent Christian teachings about passive resistance, including John 14:22–31 and an example of its use, including Martin Luther King.
  • Christian attitudes to the Just War theory: Christian teachings and responses to the nature, history and importance of the Just War theory; the conditions of a just war; divergent Christian opinions about whether a just war is possible, including Romans 13:1–7, including the application of ethical theories such as situation ethics.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Examine Christian teachings about peace making.
  • Explore the work of one Christian group working for peace in the world (there are a number but they must primarily work for peace and their motivation must be based in Christianity), their motivation and the action that they have taken including Matthew 5:1-16.
  • Examine Christian teachings and responses to the nature and causes of conflict.
  • Explore the nature of conflict and the each of the causes of conflict (politics, resources, history, culture and religion) and Christian responses to these, including Matthew 26:47-56 and links to situation ethics.
  • Discuss and analyse non-religious (including atheist and Humanist) attitudes about the role of religion in the causes of conflict and Christian responses to them.
  • Examine the nature and history of pacifism and divergent Christian teaching about it including Quaker teachings.
  • Explore divergent Christian teachings about passive resistance including John 14:22-31 and an example of passive resistance, including Martin Luther King.
  • Explore the nature and importance of the just war theory, its history and Christians teachings and responses about just war.
  • Examine the different conditions of the just war theory and discuss whether a just war is possible given modern methods of warfare.
  • Discuss and analyse divergent Christian opinions about whether a just war is possible, including Romans 13:1-7 and the application of ethical theories such as situation ethics.

back to ks4 subjects

ks4 religious studies

link to specification

Link to prior learning

  • References to the nature of God in Islam and Christianity
  • References to the experience of being a Muslim in Britain today.
  • The importance of the prophets in Islam and Christianity
  • The Qur’an, Hadith, Sunnah and Surah (SoA).
  • Islamic concepts of life after death, judgement, resurrection, heaven and hell – links to Christian and Jewish beliefs.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The naure of Islam in Britain and the Shi’a Sunni split.
  • The Six Beliefs and Five Roots and their importance for Muslims today, including different Shi’a communities.
  • The nature of Allah – Tawhid, immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, benevolence, justice.
  • The nature and importance of Prophets, Kutub and Malaikah.
  • The nature and importance of al-Qadr, free-will, judgement and beliefs about life after death.
  • The importance and purpose of marriage in Islam and non-Islamic points of view.
  • The importance of sexual relationships in Islam and non-Islamic points of view.
  • Islamic and non-Islamic teachings about homosexuality and sex outside of marriage.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain the nature of Allah in Islam?
  • Can I explain how the Six Beliefs and Five Roots affect Muslims?
  • Can I evaluate the importance of scripture to Muslims?
  • Can I explain why beliefs about Angels, the afterlife and predestination are important for Muslims?
  • Can I explain why marriage is important and Islam and the purpose of marriage for Muslims today?