Physical Education (PE)

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ks3 physical education (pe)

To instil a lifelong passion for being physically active, engaging in a broad range of sports and arming students with powerful knowledge about how to treat their body so they remain active and healthy.

MYP Assessment Criteria

Criterion A

Knowing & Understanding
(Knowledge & Application)

Criterion B

Planning for Action
(Design & Implementation)

Criterion C

Attitude & Performance
(Application)

Criterion D

Reflecting for Development
(Goal Setting)

Key Concepts

Communication

Related Concepts

Adaptation and choice

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Links to prior learning

The very beginning point of the curriculum. Pupils are introduced to two types of behaviour: Sportsmanship and Gamesmanship. Throughout the module/year, teachers must emphasise the importance of demonstrating sportsmanship, in addition to sporing etiquette, when participating in sport/physical activity. The emphasis for this module is routine. Teachers to ensure sportsmanship, and the display of respect, is evident in all lessons, referring to why sport is a positive tool when rules are upheld.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are rules?
  • What is Sporting Etiquette?
  • What is Sportsmanship?
  • What is Gamesmanship?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to provide various examples of both sportsmanship and gamesmanship within the world of sport.
  • Be able to explain why rules govern a sport of their choosing.
  • Be able to expand on why it is necessary for all athletes and sports people to abide by the rules, demonstrate sporting etiquette, and uphold the values of sportsmanship

Key Concepts

Change

Related Concepts

Movement and environment

Link to assessment

A & D

ATLs

Research and thinking

Links to prior learning

  • All aspects of sporting performance require a good level of health and fitness.
  • Pupils, from the outset, will be clear with the definitions to ensure clarity and understanding moving forwards.
  • The components of fitness are a sensible place to begin, due to said components being used within every single PE lesson. Pupils need to understand what they are, and why they are important in different contexts.
  • Moving forwards, this will be extremely beneficial when looking to justify answers and provide feedback to a performer when observing their performance.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the definition of Health and Fitness?
  • What are the six, skill-related components of fitness and their definitions?
  • What are the four, health-related components of fitness and their definitions?
  • What are some examples of the components of fitness within sport?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to categorise, explain and provide examples of the components of fitness within different sporting contexts.
  • To recognise that not all athletes require the same components of fitness and understand why.

Key Concepts

Development

Related Concepts

Refinement and systems

Link to assessment

A & B

ATLs

Social and self management skills

Links to prior learning

Pupils will be able to transfer this knowledge into real-life situations, where healthy choices are desired and preferred, whilst a recognition that everyone, regardless of career, needs to ensure they find a healthy balance.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the macro and micro nutrient food groups?
  • What proportions of each food group does an individual require?
  • What does a healthy, balanced lifestyle look like?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to plan healthy meals that factor in macro/micronutrient proportions for themselves.
  • Be able to understand and explain why each food group is important and the role of them.

Key Concepts

Relationships

Related Concepts

Balance and systems

Link to assessment

A & D

ATLs

Social and self management skills

Links to prior learning

  • Pupils will be able to transfer knowledge from the previous knowledge of the different macro/micro nutrient food groups into that of an athlete.
  • Pupils will be able to understand how sportspeople tailor their diet to support them with the realms of their activity, inked to the components of fitness.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is nutrition?
  • How does nutrition in sport differ from an everyday healthy diet?
  • How nutrition impacts athletes performance.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to differentiate how macro/micronutrient groups differ in proportions for athletes.
  • Be able to plan healthy meals which allow athletes to train and perform successfully.

Key Concepts

Identity

Related Concepts

Balance and adaptation

Link to assessment

A & B

ATLs

Research and thinking

Links to prior learning

  • Pupils will require an understanding of a healthy lifestyle, looking at both a healthy diet and being physically active.
  • Have an understanding of the various components of fitness and the difference types of exercise that are available.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a lifestyle choice?
  • What is a sedentary lifestyle?
  • Explain how physical inactivity can affect our lifestyle and why being physically active will support a lifestyle free from illness.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the importance of leading a physically active lifestyle and the consequences of being sedentary can do to our health both mentally and physically.
  • Being able to be physically active by planning and carrying out various forms of exercise.

Key concept

 

Related concept

 

ATLs

 

Declarative knowledge

  •  

Procedural knowledge

  •  

Links to prior learning

  •  

Link to assessment

A & B

Key Concepts

Systems

Related Concepts

Adaptation & systems

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Links to prior learning

The very beginning point of the curriculum. Pupils are introduced to two types of behaviour: Sportsmanship and Gamesmanship. Throughout the module/year, teachers must emphasise the importance of demonstrating sportsmanship, in addition to sporing etiquette, when participating in sport/physical activity. The emphasis for this module is routine. Teachers to ensure sportsmanship, and the display of respect, is evident in all lessons, referring to why sport is a positive tool when rules are upheld.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are cuts and the treatment required from a minor cut to a large cut.
  • The danger of leaving a cut untreated/dirty and the effects that this can have on our overall health.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Being able to recognise when self or others have injured themselves through a cut, actively being able to treat cuts or make judgement calls if further help is necessary.

Key Concepts

Change

Related Concepts

Movement & interaction

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Communication and social skills

Links to prior learning

The very beginning point of the curriculum. Pupils are introduced to two types of behaviour: Sportsmanship and Gamesmanship. Throughout the module/year, teachers must emphasise the importance of demonstrating sportsmanship, in addition to sporing etiquette, when participating in sport/physical activity. The emphasis for this module is routine. Teachers to ensure sportsmanship, and the display of respect, is evident in all lessons, referring to why sport is a positive tool when rules are upheld.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the major bones within the human body?
  • What are the major muscles within the body?
  • What is an antagonistic pair?
  • How do muscles create movement?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise how movement is initiated by a muscle when it contracts
  • Be able to identify the muscles used to bring about movement within a sporting technique
  • Be able to recognise the major bones that encompass general sporting movement

Key Concepts

Relationships

Related Concepts

Energy & Balance

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Social and self management skills

Links to prior learning

The very beginning point of the curriculum. Pupils are introduced to two types of behaviour: Sportsmanship and Gamesmanship. Throughout the module/year, teachers must emphasise the importance of demonstrating sportsmanship, in addition to sporing etiquette, when participating in sport/physical activity. The emphasis for this module is routine. Teachers to ensure sportsmanship, and the display of respect, is evident in all lessons, referring to why sport is a positive tool when rules are upheld.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why is it important to undertake a warm-up before physical activity?
  • What are the main components (parts) of a warm up and cool down?
  • What are the benefits of a cool down?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to devise and lead an appropriate warm-up for the physical activity they are undertaking.
  • Be able to recognise and explain why a warm-up is important and how a cool down can benefit our recovery.

Key Concepts

Change

Related Concepts

Function & Balance

Link to assessment

A & B

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is aerobic exercise?
  • What is anaerobic exercise?
  • What are the immediate, short, and long term effects of exercise on the body?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise the effects exercise has on the body within the immediate, short and long-term.

Key Concepts

Relationships

Related Concepts

Perspective & Choice

Link to assessment

A & D

ATLs

Social and self management skills

Links to prior learning

The very beginning point of the curriculum. Pupils are introduced to two types of behaviour: Sportsmanship and Gamesmanship. Throughout the module/year, teachers must emphasise the importance of demonstrating sportsmanship, in addition to sporing etiquette, when participating in sport/physical activity. The emphasis for this module is routine. Teachers to ensure sportsmanship, and the display of respect, is evident in all lessons, referring to why sport is a positive tool when rules are upheld.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is emotional wellbeing?
  • How can lifestyle choices affect emotional wellbeing?
  • The importance and understanding of looking after our emotional wellbeing.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to reflect and challenge personal lifestyle choices and check in with themselves in regards to their own emotional wellbeing.
  • Be able to understand the importance and relevance of consistently doing this.

Key Concepts

Change

Related Concepts

Adaptation and choice

Link to assessment

A & B

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a goal?
  • How do you set realistic goals?
  • Why there is a need for goal setting?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to reflect on personal and academic life, create realistic goals with time frames to achieve.
  • Be able to apply this within PE lessons and a sport setting, as well as focusing on the importance for athletes to set goals.

Key Concepts

Systems

Related Concepts

Adaptation & systems

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a fracture?
  • What is the primary care required for a suspected fracture?
  • What further steps should be taken for a fracture?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify a suspected fracture and take necessary steps to secure the fracture (depending on where in the body) and then what steps to take.

Key Concepts

Communication

Related Concepts

Environment and systems

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Links to prior learning

With a healthy, active lifestyle at the forefront of each and every lesson, pupils know the importance (physically, mentally, and socially) of regular participation in physical activity, and therefore by understanding the barriers that some face, will encourage a greater awareness/exposure to the challenges that need to be tackled.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What effects participation in physical activity?
  • What barriers are there to participation?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Pupils will be able to understand why initiatives are used to increase participation in different communities.
  • Pupils will recognise the challenges certain groups face when wanting to partake in physical activity/sport.
  • Pupils will be able to suggest ways in which barriers can be overcome when wanting to increase participation.

Key Concepts

Change

Related Concepts

Space and function

ATLs

Research and thinking

Link to assessment

  • With participation (and barriers to) introduced during the previous module, pupils will now be able to recognise the external influences that come from media sources..
  • Pupils understand why physical activity is important and now they will be exposed to the influence sponsors, media outlets, and technology have on participation.

Links to prior learning

  • Pupils will understand the ‘Golden Triangle’ and how this affects participation.
  • Pupils will be able to identify media sources that promote/inhibit participation in physical activity/sport.
  • Pupils will be able to conclude as to whether technology has made a positive or negative impact on a sport of their choice.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The commercialisation of sport can create opportunities and barriers to participation.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • What is commercialisation?
  • How does sponsorship/the media affect participation?
  • How has technology evolved within the sporting world?

Key Concepts

Development

Related Concepts

Adaptation and refinement

Link to assessment

A & D

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Links to prior learning

  • Pupils will be able to identify a variety of prohibited substances and understand the advantage they would give the performer.
  • Pupils will be able to recognise positive/negative behaviours that are associated with spectators.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The behaviour of those within the realm of sport must support fairness.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • How does player conduct affect the image a sport has?
  • What are prohibited substances within sport?
  • How can spectator behaviour affect the image a sport has?

Key Concepts

Global interactions

Related Concepts

Environment & choice

Link to assessment

A & D

ATLs

Research skills and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is hooliganism?
  • What are key reasons for combating hooliganism in sport?
  • The effects of hooliganism in sport can have on the wider society.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify hooliganism behaviour in both a sporting environment and within everyday life, understanding the need to eliminate it due to the further dangerous implications it can have

Key Concepts

Systems

Related Concepts

Function & balance

Link to assessment

A & B

ATLs

Research and self management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is an injury?
  • What is the procedure for treating common injuries?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to act upon injuries for both self and others
  • Understanding what is required and the importance of what can happen to our bodies if injuries are not taken care of effectively.

Key Concepts

Systems

Related Concepts

Adaptation & systems

Link to assessment

A & C

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is CPR?
  • What is a defibrillator?
  • Why is CPR important and why it is important for all individuals to know how to perform CPR effectively.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise when an individual requires CPR or a defibrillator and perform CPR.
  • Be able to recognise the different techniques required between adults and babies when performing CPR.

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Which sport suits your personality?

Read
Why is physical activity important?

Read
The Food Groups

Modules 3 & 4

Read
Which sport suits your personality?

Read
Why is physical activity important?

Read
The Components of Fitness

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1-4

Read
The Skeletal and Muscular Systems

Watch
TED Talks – PE

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Target Setting

Read
Why PE?

Watch
TED Talks – PE

Modules 3 & 4

Read
Methods of Training

Read
Why PE?

Watch
TED Talks – PE

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ks4 physical education (pe)

link to specification

Link to prior learning

Pupils will have a solid foundation of knowledge from KS3. Module One will be used to recap and develop this knowledge in an applied manner, to varying sporting examples and scenarios.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The major bones within the skeletal system.
  • The major muscles within the muscular system.
  • The functions of the skeletal system.
  • What sporting examples can be applied to each function?
  • The structure of a synovial joint.
  • The role of the synovial joint.
  • The roles of ligaments and tendons.
  • The different types of joint in the body.
  • What are the joint movements associated with specific sporting movements?
  • Antagonistic muscle pairs.
  • Which muscle is the agonist, and which is the antagonist, in a specific sporting movement?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify (on the body) the location of the major bones and muscles;
  • Be able to identify the major muscles and bones responsible for specific sporting actions, identifying the agonist (and antagonist) muscle within said action;
  • Be able to recognise when the functions of the skeletal system are used within different sporting scenarios;
  • Be able to clearly identify the components (and therefore structure) of a synovial joint, and its role within the body;
  • Be able to identify sporting movements which require movement at a specific joint in order for successful execution;
  • Be able to explain how a muscle group works isometrically or isotonically (concentric and eccentric) in order to perform a specific sporting action.

Link to prior learning

With knowledge obtained from both KS3 PE and Science, pupils will build on their understanding of gaseous exchange, heart structure, and breathing mechanics to apply such knowledge to sporting examples and provide reasoned conclusions.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The pathway of air.
  • What are the characteristics and features of the alveoli?
  • Gaseous exchange.
  • What are structural features of arteries, capillaries, and veins? (Blood Vessels)
  • What are the functions of each blood vessel and how do their structural features support this?
  • The structure of the heart.
  • What is the cardiac cycle/the pathway of blood through the heart?
  • What is heart rate, stroke volume, and cardiac output?
  • The mechanics of breathing – the interaction of the intercostal muscles, ribs and diaphragm in breathing.
  • The types of lung volume.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Understand the role of haemoglobin in the transport of oxygen and carbon dioxide.
  • Explain how the features/characteristics of the alveoli assist with gaseous exchange.
  • Assess each vessels relative importance.
  • Further apply the learning to the vessels entering/exiting the heart.
  • Understand the relationship to calculate cardiac output.
  • Be able to analyse data and spot changes in heart rate.
  • Plot graphs to demonstrate heart rate data that can be explained/analysed.
  • Name the anatomical parts involved and explain how these work together during inhalation.
  • Explain how these work together during exhalation (including the role of other muscles).
  • Explain what each volume is.
  • Be able to identify each on a spirometer trace.
  • Be able to interpret/analyse each on a spirometer trace.

Link to prior learning

  • With reference to prior knowledge obtained, pupils are confident in their understanding of what is meant by health and fitness, whilst most will be able to recall the components of fitness with a high level of success.
  • Pupils will build on this to recognise a variety of sporting examples (from various disciplines) in which the components of fitness can be applied.
  • Pupils will be introduced to movement patterns, recognising the demands from different sports and the skills/techniques that are required.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Health and Fitness;
  • Linking participation in physical activity, exercise and sport to health, well-being and fitness, and how exercise can suit the varying needs of different people;
  • The consequences of a sedentary lifestyle;
  • Obesity;
  • Somatotypes;
  • Energy use and Nutrition.
  • The Components of Fitness;
  • Reasons why we fitness test;
  • Measuring the components of fitness.
  • Understanding the terms aerobic exercise (in the presence of oxygen) and anaerobic exercise (in the absence of enough oxygen).
  • Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC)/oxygen debt as the result of muscles respiring anaerobically during vigorous exercise and producing lactic acid.
  • The recovery process from vigorous exercise: cool down; manipulation of diet; ice baths/massage.
  • The immediate effects of exercise (during exercise);
  • The short-term effects of exercise (24-36 hours after exercise);
  • The long-term effects of exercise (months and years of exercising).
  • Levers, Planes and Axes:
    • First, Second and Third class lever systems within sporting examples;
    • Mechanical advantage in relation to the three lever systems;
    • Identification of the relevant planes (frontal, transverse, sagittal) and axes (longitudinal, transverse, sagittal) of movement used whilst performing sporting actions.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Simple recall of definitions (health; fitness; components of fitness);
  • Develop the ability to explain the 3 concepts of health (physical, mental, social);
  • Link exercise to the effects on each.
  • Link obesity to the effects on performance/health;
  • Application of each body type to a variety of sporting examples, and their appropriateness;
  • Understand the constituents of a balanced diet;
  • Evaluation of why a balanced diet is needed;
  • Evaluate why water intake is required, making reasoned conclusions.
  • Evaluate and justify the importance of the components to varying sporting examples (use of reasoned conclusions);
  • Recall reasons and limitations of fitness testing;
  • Explain the basic protocol of each fitness test.
  • Summary of aerobic exercise: glucose + oxygen → energy + carbon dioxide + water.
  • Summary of anaerobic exercise: glucose → energy + lactic acid.
  • Link practical examples of sporting situations to aerobic or anaerobic exercise.
  • Provide justified answers with reasoned conclusion as to why an activity is likely to be aerobic or anaerobic.
  • An understanding that EPOC (oxygen debt) is caused by anaerobic exercise (producing lactic acid) and requires the performer to maintain increased breathing rate after exercise to repay the debt.
  • To justify why each recovery method would be used and the benefits each provide to the sportsperson.
  • Name the effects of exercise; Explain the effects of exercise.
  • Identification of first, second and third class lever systems;
  • Interpretation of sporting movements or actions which involve flexion or extension of the elbow, hip and/or knee, and plantar or dorsi-flexion at the ankle.
  • Label the effort arm and load/resistance arm on the three classes of lever.
    Mechanical advantage = effort arm ÷ weight (resistance) arm.
  • Justify why one lever has a bigger mechanical advantage than another.
  • Planes (frontal, transverse, sagittal) and axes (longitudinal, transverse, sagittal) should be related to varying sporting actions.

Link to prior learning

Pupils were introduced to the principles of training at KS3, and will now be taught explicit examples of how these can be applied across a variety of sports, using their knowledge of the methods of training to support said application.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • SPORT to include:
    • specificity;
    • progressive overload;
    • reversibility;
    • tedium.
  • Key principles of overload.
  • FITT to include:
    • frequency;
    • intensity;
    • time;
    • type.
  • Types/Methods of training.
  • Calculating inensities to optimise training effectiveness;
  • Considerations for injury prevention;
  • Specific training techniques;
  • Seasonal aspects;
  • Warming up and Cooling down.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • How the principles of training can be applied to bring about improvements in fitness;
  • Application of the principles to varying sporting examples;
  • Evaluate how certain principles hold particular importance when training for certain sports;
  • Make explicit links to the training types below.
  • Understand the distinctions between the different types of training;
  • The advantages and disadvantages (the effects on the body) of each type of training method stated above.
  • Students will be taught to select and evaluate appropriate training methods for various (aerobic and anaerobic) fitness needs and make links to sporting activity.
  • Evaluation and justification (with reasoned conclusions) as to why some training types are particularly useful for specified sports.
  • Basic recall of the specified intensities;
  • Applications of each to specific training types;
  • Linking the principles of training to sporting activities and training types, justifying the choice and the calculated intensity to be used.
  • Basic recall of the potential ways to prevent injury;
  • Evaluation of which ways are appropriate to which training types and sporting activities.
  • Understanding altitude training and the benefits when returning to sea level;
  • Evaluation of who would use altitude training with reasoned conclusions.
  • The names of the three seasons and their application to varying sports;
  • Evaluating the importance of each season.
  • What ‘parts’ a warm up and cool down should entail;
  • Applied examples to varying sports;
  • Evaluation of the benefits to be achieved.

Link to prior learning

Paper 2, and more specifically Sports Psychology, will draw on pupils’ knowledge of goal setting and guidance and feedback. This will be developed through an introduction to SMART targets and the types of motivation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Skill and ability;
  • Skill classifications;
  • The use and evaluation of setting performance and outcome goals in sporting examples;
  • The use of SMART targets to improve and/or optimise performance.
  • Basic information processing model;
  • The types of guidance and feedback.
  • Arousal;
  • Aggression;
  • Personality Types;
  • Motivation.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Pupils will choose and justify the approproate skill classification in relation to varying sporting examples.
  • Pupils will be able to set/recognise appropriate performance and/or outcome targets from varying sporting examples.
  • Apply SMART targets to a variety of sporting examples.
  • To apply the basic information processing model to skills from a variety of sporting examples.
  • Be able to evaluate the importance of each stage.
  • Evaluation of the use of the following types of guidance with specific links to:
    • visual (seeing)
    • verbal (hearing)
    • manual (assist movement– physical)
    • mechanical (use of objects/aids).
  • Students will be able to choose and justify which types of guidance are appropriate for beginners and/or elite level performers.
  • Evaluation of the use of the following types of feedback with specific links to beginners and to elite level performers:
  • positive/negative
  • knowledge of results/knowledge of performance
  • extrinsic/intrinsic.
  • Link the types of guidance and feedback to the stages of learning, providing reasoned conclusions.
  • To understand the relationship between arousal level and performance level;
  • Explain the stages of the inverted-U theory (before optimum point, optimum point and after optimum point).
  • Link appropriate arousal level (high/low) to gross/fine skills in sporting actions.
  • Link skills (not sports) to an appropriate arousal level, eg a tackle in rugby will need a high arousal level.
  • Understand and explain the terms direct and indirect aggression. Provide sporting examples of when these occur.
  • Knowledge of the terms introvert and extrovert;
  • Explain the characteristics of an introvert/extrovert;
  • Apply the sporting choices of a typical introvert/extrovert.
  • Explanation of the types of motivation;
  • Evaluate the worth or significance of both types, using practical examples.

Link to prior learning

Sociocultural influences have yet to be introduced to pupils, and therefore this module will expose them to this content for the first time, whilst drawing opinions from personal experiences when participating in, or spectating, physical activity and/or sport.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Engagement patterns of different social groups and the factors affecting participation.
  • Commercialisation (Sponsorship, Media, and Technology)
  • Conduct of performers.
  • Prohibited substances (PEDs and Blood Doping);
  • Advantages/Disadvantages to performer;
  • Advantages/Disadvantages to sport.
  • Spectator behaviour (hooliganism);
  • Strategies employed to combat hooliganism/spectator behaviour.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Understand factors that contribute to engagement patterns in the following social groups:
    • gender
    • race/religion/culture
    • age
    • family/friends/peers
    • disability.
  • Students will make links between the following factors/barriers and their relevance to engagement patterns of the groups above:
    • attitudes
    • role models
    • accessibility (to facilities/clubs/ activities)
    • media coverage
    • sexism/stereotyping
    • culture/religion/religious festivals
    • family commitments
    • available leisure time
    • familiarity
    • education
    • socio-economic factors/disposable income
    • adaptability/inclusiveness.
  • Understand the types of sponsorship/media within a variety of sporting contexts;
  • Pupils will develop a breadth of understanding and justify why commercialised activity can have a positive and/or negative impact;
  • Provide basic advantages and disadvantages of technology in sport; evaluating the advantages and disadvantages, with applied examples to varying sports.
  • Explain and apply varying sporting examples to the key definitions of conduct.
  • Evaluation of the advantages/disadvnatages of using PEDs and blood doping;
  • Relating specific types of PEDs to certain sports/activities with reasoned conclusion as to why they would benefit from said substance.
  • Evaluating the positive and negative influence of spectators at matches/events;
  • Develop an understanding of why hooliganism occurs;
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of strategies employed to combat hooliganism/spectator behaviour, with reasoned conclusions.

Coursework to be completed and practical areas to be submitted

Content

  • 3.2.2.1 Engagement Patterns of Social Groups in Physical Activity and Sport
  • 3.2.2.2 Commercialisation of Physical Activity and Sport
  • 3.2.2.3 Ethical and Sociocultural Issues in Physical Activity and Sport

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Engagement patterns of different social groups and the factors affecting participation.
  • Commercialisation (Sponsorship, Media, and Technology)
  • Conduct of performers.
  • Prohibited substances (PEDs and Blood Doping);
    • Advantages/Disadvantages to the performer;
    • Advantages/Disadvantages to the sport.
  • Spectator behaviour (hooliganism);
    • Strategies employed to combat hooliganism/spectator behaviour.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Understand factors that contribute to engagement patterns in the following social groups:
    • gender
    • race/religion/culture
    • age
    • family/friends/peers
    • disability.
  • Students will make links between the following factors/barriers and their relevance to the engagement patterns of the groups above:
    • attitudes
    • role models
    • accessibility (to facilities/clubs/ activities)
    • media coverage
    • sexism/stereotyping
    • culture/religion/religious festivals
    • family commitments
    • available leisure time
    • familiarity
    • education
    • socio-economic factors/disposable income
    • adaptability/inclusiveness.
  • Understand the types of sponsorship/media within a variety of sporting contexts.
  • Pupils will develop a breadth of understanding and justify why commercialised activity can have a positive and/or negative impact.
  • Provide advantages and disadvantages of technology in sport; evaluate the advantages and disadvantages, with applied examples to varying sports.
  • Explain and apply varying sporting examples to the key definitions of conduct.
  • Evaluation of the advantages/disadvantages of using PEDs and blood doping;
  • Relating specific types of PEDs to certain sports/activities with a reasoned conclusion as to why they would benefit from said substance.
  • Evaluating the positive and negative influence of spectators at matches/events;
  • Develop an understanding of why hooliganism occurs;
  • To evaluate the effectiveness of strategies employed to combat hooliganism/spectator behaviour, with reasoned conclusions.

Link to prior learning

  • With reference to prior knowledge obtained, pupils are confident in their understanding of what is meant by health and fitness, whilst most will be able to recall the components of fitness with a high level of success.
  • Pupils will build on this to recognise a variety of sporting examples (from various disciplines) in which the components of fitness can be applied.
  • Pupils will be introduced to movement patterns, recognising the demands from different sports and the skills/techniques that are required.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Health and Fitness;
  • Linking participation in physical activity, exercise and sport to health, well-being and fitness, and how exercise can suit the varying needs of different people;
  • The consequences of a sedentary lifestyle;
  • Obesity;
  • Somatotypes;
  • Energy use and Nutrition.
  • The Components of Fitness;
  • Reasons why we fitness test;
  • Measuring the components of fitness.
  • Understanding the terms aerobic exercise (in the presence of oxygen) and anaerobic exercise (in the absence of enough oxygen).
  • Excess post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC)/oxygen debt as the result of muscles respiring anaerobically during vigorous exercise and producing lactic acid.
  • The recovery process from vigorous exercise: cool down; manipulation of diet; ice baths/massage.
  • The immediate effects of exercise (during exercise);
  • The short-term effects of exercise (24-36 hours after exercise);
  • The long-term effects of exercise (months and years of exercising).
  • Levers, Planes and Axes:
    • First, Second and Third class lever systems within sporting examples;
    • Mechanical advantage in relation to the three lever systems;
    • Identification of the relevant planes (frontal, transverse, sagittal) and axes (longitudinal, transverse, sagittal) of movement used whilst performing sporting actions.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Simple recall of definitions (health; fitness; components of fitness);
  • Develop the ability to explain the 3 concepts of health (physical, mental, social);
  • Link exercise to the effects on each.
  • Link obesity to the effects on performance/health;
  • Application of each body type to a variety of sporting examples, and their appropriateness;
  • Understand the constituents of a balanced diet;
  • Evaluation of why a balanced diet is needed;
  • Evaluate why water intake is required, making reasoned conclusions.
  • Evaluate and justify the importance of the components to varying sporting examples (use of reasoned conclusions);
  • Recall reasons and limitations of fitness testing;
  • Explain the basic protocol of each fitness test.
  • Summary of aerobic exercise: glucose + oxygen → energy + carbon dioxide + water.
  • Summary of anaerobic exercise: glucose → energy + lactic acid.
  • Link practical examples of sporting situations to aerobic or anaerobic exercise.
  • Provide justified answers with reasoned conclusion as to why an activity is likely to be aerobic or anaerobic.
  • An understanding that EPOC (oxygen debt) is caused by anaerobic exercise (producing lactic acid) and requires the performer to maintain increased breathing rate after exercise to repay the debt.
  • To justify why each recovery method would be used and the benefits each provide to the sportsperson.
  • Name the effects of exercise; Explain the effects of exercise.
  • Identification of first, second and third class lever systems;
  • Interpretation of sporting movements or actions which involve flexion or extension of the elbow, hip and/or knee, and plantar or dorsi-flexion at the ankle.
  • Label the effort arm and load/resistance arm on the three classes of lever.
    Mechanical advantage = effort arm ÷ weight (resistance) arm.
  • Justify why one lever has a bigger mechanical advantage than another.
  • Planes (frontal, transverse, sagittal) and axes (longitudinal, transverse, sagittal) should be related to varying sporting actions.

Pupils will be taught how to structure their answers (particularly for six and nine-mark questions) to ensure they can access the higher grade boundaries.

Pupils will revisit challenging topics and personalised revision plans will be distributed, identifying areas of knowledge which require greater attention in the lead up to their examination