History

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ks3 history

In an increasingly complex world, students should be aware of how they have been shaped. We are shaped by our pasts, learning from others’ experiences.  We are shaped by our location and how society has developed.  We are shaped by our planet. We are shaped by our beliefs and ideas.

Subjects in Individuals and Societies follow sequences of lessons that, through repeated exposure and clear linking, ensure students are able to retain key declarative knowledge and abstract concepts such as monarchy and location. They embed and develop the key procedural skills of the discipline, allowing them to analyse, explain, describe and critically assess.

History is structured in a broadly chronological order and lessons highlight key concepts such as change, continuity, power and conflict. These abstracts are returned to in different settings in order that students can articulate the subjects’ core concepts and topic specific knowledge.

MYP Assessment Criteria

Criterion A

Knowledge & Understanding

Criterion B

Investigating

Criterion C

Communication

Criterion D

Thinking Critically

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Culture

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is an inference?
  • What is chronology?
  • What is the difference between AD, BC, CE and BCE?
  • What makes a source reliable?
  • What is the difference between primary and secondary sources?
  • Why was the Nile so important to Egypt?
  • Why did Egyptian art look ‘wrong’?
  • How did rulers represent themselves?
  • What happened during the process of mummification?
  • How do people remember Ramesses II?
  • Were there any obvious similarities between Egyptian and Greek religious practise?
  • What were the characteristics of key Greek gods?
  • What were the events of, and purpose of, Greek sacrifice?
  • What were the characteristics of Greek heroes?
  • What were the two halves of Odysseus’ character?
  • What was the nature of Greek theatre and how important was competition?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to make an inference.
  • Be able to arrange events and dates from the Classical World in chronological order.
  • Be able to begin to investigate and evaluate the reliability of sources.
  • Be able to describe events and give one supporting detail.
  • Be able to identify similarities and differences in sources following investigation.
  • Be able to begin to form a justified judgement.

Key Concepts

Change

ATLs

Communication skills

Related Concepts

Civilisation

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Egyptian and Greek beliefs about religion.
  • Mythology in Greek culture – Odysseus and the Greek hero
  • How the Greeks entertained themselves (theatre vs. gladiators).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How did the Romans believe the city of Rome was founded?
  • Who was Rhea Silvia?
  • Who were Romulus and Remus?
  • How large was the Roman Empire?
  • When did Britain become part of the Roman Empire?
  • What was life like at Hadrian’s Wall?
  • What were the different types of Gladiators?
  • Where was the amphitheatre in London and what happened there?
  • How important was Bathing to Roman Society?
  • What was Roman Colchester like?
  • How did the Romans worship?
  • How did the Romans change Britain?
  • Why did the Roman empire collapse?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Write a narrative account about the Foundation of Rome
  • Infer from classical sources about life in the north of the Province of Britannia, including supporting detail.
  • Be able to write an explanation essay and begin to give a clear judgement about how far we can understand what life was like in a Roman town
  • Clearly identify two key features of Roman religious worship and give supporting details.
  • Be able to begin to make a judgement on how far the Romans changed Britain.
  • Write a narrative account about the collapse of the Roman empire.

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Thinking skills

Related Concepts

Conflict

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The difference between poly and monotheistic religions.
  • How did cultural beliefs affect Egyptian art?
  • The importance of Rome in the empire.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who was Muhammed?
  • How did Islam initially spread?
  • Why was Baghdad such an important cultural site?
  • How did Muslim artists celebrate their faith?
  • Why are there restrictions on Muslim art?
  • Why was Jerusalem such an important city for Muslims, Jews and Christians?
  • Who was Pope Urban and why did he launch the Crusades?
  • Why did people go on Crusade?
  • What was the impact of the Crusades on Europe?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Identify key features in the life of Muhammed and the spread of Islam.
  • Identify differences between Egyptian and Islamic Art.
  • Analyse sources from Pope Urban using one element of PANDA.
  • Write a judgement essay about the reasons why people went on Crusade.
  • Write an explanation essay about the impact of the Crusades on Europe.

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Civilisation

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Comparison with the administrative capabilities of Rome.
  • Comparison with Egyptian Royalty – Cleopatra and Ramesses II.
  • Comparison with the religions of Greece, Egypt, Rome and Islam.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Africa?
  • What was the Scramble for Africa?
  • How did European historians view Africa?
  • Who was King Tenkamenin of Ghana?
  • What was Great Zimbabwe like?
  • How did the Administration of Mali function?
  • How important were the royals of Benin?
  • What was unique about the religion in Ethiopia?
  • How civilised was pre-colonial Africa?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Identify the location of Africa.
  • Critically analyse the opinions of European historians using one element of PANDA.
  • Write an essay that gives a judgement about the level of civilisation in Africa.
  • Use primary sources to analyse the countries of Ghana, Zimbabwe, Mali, Benin and Ethiopia.

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Comparison with King Tenkamenin of Ghana, Cleopatra and Ramesses.
  • Comparison with Greek theatres, Roman baths: how civilised was England?
  • Comparison of the way Jewish people were treated with the way the Christians treated Muslims in the Middle East.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was England like in 1066?
  • Who was in line to succeed Edward the Confessor?
  • Who won the Battle of Fulford Bridge?
  • How did William win the Battle of Hastings?
  • What problems faced William when he became king and how did he solve them?
  • What was it like to live in a village?
  • What was Medieval England like for women?
  • How were Jewish people treated in Medieval England?
  • What was it like to live in a town?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Begin to analyse interpretations of history concerning the succession to Edward’s throne.
  • Analyse different factors and form a judgement about why William won the Battle of Hastings.
  • Use sources to determine what life was like for women and Jewish people in Medieval England.
  • Identify key features of town and village life.

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What did Henry II mean when he asked to be rid of ‘this turbulent priest’?
  • How did the Black Death kill people?
  • What cures did people try?
  • Why did the Peasants revolt against their king?
  • What was the Renaissance?
  • Why did Martin Luther protest?
  • Why did Henry VIII have so many problems?
  • Why did Henry VIII Break from Rome?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Identify key features and give supporting details in the death of Thomas Becket.
  • Write an explanation essay about the impact of the Black Death.
  • Analyse sources to determine the causes of the Peasant’s Revolt.
  • Write a judgement essay about the most important reason that Henry broke from Rome.

Key Concepts

Change

ATLs

Communication skills

Related Concepts

Causality

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The religion in England before Henry VIII.
  • Henry’s Divorce from Katherine of Aragon.
  • Henry’s marriage to Anne Boleyn and conversion to Protestantism.
  • Henry’s role as Head of the Church in England.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What changes did Edward make to the English church and why?
  • What were the plans for his succession.
  • What did Mary do to the church as queen and how did she deal with English Protestants?
  • Why was Mary’s marriage to Philip so unpopular?
  • How is Mary remembered?
  • What problems did Elizabeth face in her childhood?
  • What was Elizabeth’s relationship with her siblings like?
  • What was Elizabeth’s religious settlement?
  • What objections did the Puritans and Catholics have to the settlement?
  • Why did Elizabeth execute Mary Queen of Scots?
  • What were the causes of the Spanish Armada and the reasons for its failure?
  • What factors that drove early exploration and what were the attitudes of the explorers?
  • How did Elizabeth portray herself in art?
  • Why was James VI / I able to become king of England?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to investigate and analyse sources.
  • Be able to infer from sources.
  • Be able to describe and give one precise piece of supporting detail.
  • Be able to read texts for key pieces of information.
  • Be able to write a narrative account.
  • Be able to begin using PANDA to investigate sources.
  • Be able to write an explanation essay with three paragraphs, each containing a precise detail.
  • Be able to write with clarity and organise ideas clearly.
  • Be able to begin assessing interpretations.

Key Concepts

Systems

ATLs

Self-management skills

Related Concepts

Governance

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Explicit links to the nature of Puritanism and the lingering Catholicism in England.
  • The impact of autocracy on the country – see. Henry VIII and the Break with Rome.
  • How was Bloody Mary remembered? Is that fair?
  • Use of PANDA in the success of Mary lesson.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why did Charles I fall out with Parliament?
  • What was the Divine Right of Kings?
  • How did Parliament reform the army during the Civil War?
  • Who was Oliver Cromwell and what was the New Model Army?
  • How far did Prince Rupert help the royalist cause?
  • What was Charles accused of and what happened to him?
  • Why do people accuse Cromwell of being a war criminal?
  • Is Cromwell appropriately remembered in Britain?
  • What was Restoration England like?
  • Was Charles II a Merry Monarch?
  • What was it like to live through the Great Plague and how effective were the actions of the government?
  • What was the impact of the Great Fire of London?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to form a coherent judgement on the reasons why Parliament and Charles fell out.
  • Be able to compare the benefits of autocracy with the benefits of parliamentary rule.
  • Be able to identify the change and consequence of Parliament’s military reforms.
  • Be able to use source analysis to form a judgement on the role of Rupert.
  • Be able to weigh up the evidence about Cromwell to form a judgement.
  • Be able to analyse pictorial sources to form a judgement about Restoration England and Charles II
  • Use PANDA to form a judgement on the impact of the Plague on London
  • Write a clear narrative account of the Great Fire of London.

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Social skills

Related Concepts

Governance

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Links to the slavery of Ancient Rome.
  • Links to the importance of crops in Egypt and Medieval England.
  • Links to English competition with France and Spain, especially as a Protestant country.
  • Link to the statue of Cromwell at Parliament.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why did Britain have colonies in America?
  • Which countries was Britain in competition with?
  • How were tobacco and cotton grown and why were they suited to slave labour?
  • How were people enslaved?
  • What happened during the Middle Passage?
  • What was a slave worth and how were they sold?
  • How did slaves adapt?
  • What were the punishments for resisting the planters?
  • How did Britain profit from the Slave Trade?
  • What happened in Haiti, Hispaniola, Brazil and the Congo?
  • How did American Independence affect the campaign for abolition?
  • What is the case for paying reparations?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to state key features of slavery.
  • Be able to write a narrative account about how the Atlantic Slave Trade began.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of written sources about the Middle Passage using PANDA.
  • Be able to write an essay that explains the Trade Triangle.
  • Be able to make inferences about conditions on Slave Ships from visual and written sources.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of sources about life on Plantations.
  • Be able to make a judgement about who benefitted the most from the Slave Trade.
  • Understand the global nature of the slave trade by looking at examples in other countries.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of how slavery was abolished.
  • Be able to explain the arguments made for paying reparations.

Key Concepts

Change

ATLs

Thinking skills

Related Concepts

Innovation and revolution

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Life in Medieval Towns and Villages.
  • The spread of the plague in medieval towns.
  • The impact of the Renaissance on education.
  • How successful was Charles I as king?

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How did the landscape of Britain change 1750 -1900?
  • What was it like to work in a mill?
  • Why did the population of Britain increase during the Industrial Revolution?
  • How did the Industrial Revolution affect industry, agriculture, iron and coal production?
  • What improvements did the growth of the Railways network bring?
  • What can Charles Booth’s map tell us about what life was like for the urban poor?
  • Why is there such confusion over the identity of Jack the Ripper and why are the murders so famous?
  • What was it like to work in a mine?
  • How successful an engineer and businessman was Brunel?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the consequences of Industrial Revolution on the British landscape.
  • Be able to state key features of working in a mill.
  • Be able to make an inference from a written source about the concerns of the mill owners.
  • Be able to explain why the population of Britain grew during the Industrial Revolution.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of how the railways created jobs.
  • Be able to make inferences about the level of poverty in London from Booth’s map.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of Booth’s map using PANDA.
  • Be able to form a judgement about the likley identity of Jack the Ripper.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of sources that discuss the conditions faced by miners using PANDA.

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • European attitudes to West African civilisation.
  • European attitudes to Africans and slavery.
  • Attitudes of royalty and imperialism (Henry VIII, Charles I).
  • Impact of technological advances in war (New Model Army, Ironsides).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was the Scramble for Africa and why did it happen?
  • Why was Franz Ferdinand assassinated?
  • What were the MAIN causes of World War One?
  • Why did Britain go to war to defend Belgium?
  • What were the French and German battle plans?
  • How did the war become one of attrition?
  • How did Britain try to recruit men into the army?
  • Why was conscription introduced?
  • What was the impact of the tank, the plane, the submarine and the creeping barrage?
  • How were wounded men dealt with?
  • What advances did Gillies make?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to make an inference about the importance of Africa to the European powers.
  • Be able to identify two key features of Franz Ferdinand’s assassination.
  • Be able to write an essay that explains the MAIN causes of WWI.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of Britain’s declaration of war in 1914.
  • Be able to identify the key features of Plan 17 and the Schlieffen Plan.
  • Be able to make inferences about what life was like in the trenches.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of recruitment posters.
  • Be able to identify the key features of each technological advance.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of Gillies’ photographs.

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The role of Prince Rupert in the Civil War.
  • Comparison of Cromwell’s destruction of Irish crops and the U-boat blockade.
  • Life as a Roman and Medieval woman.
  • Elizabeth’s decision not to marry.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • European attitudes to West African civilisation.
  • European attitudes to Africans and slavery.
  • Attitudes of royalty and imperialism (Henry VIII, Charles I).
  • Impact of technological advances in war (New Model Army, Ironsides).

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to write a narrative account of the events of 1917.
  • Be able to identfy the key features of heroic actions in World War One.
  • Be able to plan how to find more information about heroic actions.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of a source for understanding the impact of the U-Boat blockade on Britain.
  • Be able to identify the key features of the Suffragettes and the Suffragists.
  • Be able to plan how to find more information about the role of women in World War One.
  • Be able to write a narrative account about the impact of World War One on the suffrage campaign.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining the main terms of the Treaty of Versailles.

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Social skills

Related Concepts

Conflict

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Primary and Secondary sourcework.
  • The attitudes of one group of people to another.
  • The religious disputes between Protestants and Catholics.
  • The basic tenets of Judaism as taught in RE.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was the impact of World War One on Germany and France especially?
  • Why did the French want revenge on Germany?
  • What was the reaction of the German people to the peace terms?
  • What was the effect of the simple messaging and anti-Semitism of the NSDAP?
  • Who were the the perpetrators of the Holocaust?
  • What is the history of Christian anti-Semitism?
  • Why were Jewish people used as scapegoats?
  • How did life for Jewish people became progressively worse under Hitler’s government before World War Two?
  • Why could many Jewish people simply not leave Germany?
  • What happened to disabled people under the NSDAP regime?
  • How did people deal with the terrible moral dilemmas when confronting the reality of anti-Semitism?
  • Why did the Germans construct Ghettoes in Poland?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to investigate and infer from sources.
  • Be able to write a clear explain essay with three paragraphs, each containing a precise detail and that links directly to the question.
  • Be able to work with multiple sources to build up an accurate picture of the past.
  • Be able to write a narrative account that is in chronological order and explains how events in history are linked.

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Conflict

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The Nuremberg Laws and events of Kristallnacht
  • The role of the SS in NSDAP society.
  • NSDAP views on Untermenschen, the example of the treatment of disabled people, belief in the Aryan race.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What restrictive measures did Jewish people suffer under NSDAP rule?
  • What options were available for Jewish people to resist and how successful was this resistance?
  • What was the Wannsee Conference and what decisions were made there?
  • What happened to Jewish people at Auschwitz?
  • Who was responsible for Holocaust?
  • How far can other parties be blamed for the Holocaust (occupied countries, the Allies, inability of Jewish people to emigrate)?
  • How is the Holocaust remembered?
  • What can personal accounts tell us about the Holocaust?
  • Why and how was the state of Israel founded?
  • What was the impact of NSDAP violence on Homosexuals and Gypsies during the Holocaust?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand why Holocaust historiography changes.
  • Be able to understand where they could find more information about the Holocaust
  • Be able to make a judgement about how successfully Jewish people resisted.
  • Be able to make an inference about the purpose of the Final Solution.
  • Be able to understand where they could find more information about Auschwitz.
  • Be able to consider multiple points of view and come to a judgement about who is most responsible for the Holocaust.
  • Be able to use PANDA to form a judgement about the usefulness of If This is a Man.
  • Be able to write a narrative account about the foundation of Israel.
  • Be able to make an inference about NSDAP attitudes to Gypsies.
  • Be able to understand where they could find more information about the persecution of Homosexuals.

Key Concepts

Systems

ATLs

Communication skills

Related Concepts

Innovation and revolution

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Slavery in the British Empire.
  • Dehumanisation and discrimination against the Jewish people in Germany.
  • The causes of the English Civil War.
  • Britain’s World War One recruitment campaign.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why were slaves important to the American economy after independence?
  • Was the Civil War fought to free the slaves?
  • How were African Americans treated after the Civil War?
  • What was Reconstruction?
  • What did the members of the KKK want?
  • What was the significance of Plessy vs. Ferguson and what was life like under Jim Crow?
  • How successful was the NAACP’s campaign of Peaceful Protest?
  • What impact did Martin Luther King have with Direct Action?
  • How significant was Brown vs. Board of Education and how committed was Eisenhower to desegregation?
  • Who was Emmett Till and how did he die?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to write a narrative account of the United States’ history from Independence to c.1850.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of sources that discuss the abolition of slavery in the UK.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining the Civil War started.
  • Be able state key features about the Civil War, KKK and Reconstruction.
  • Be able to make inferences from pictorial sources about the impact of Jim Crow.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of the work of the NAACP and peaceful protest.
  • Be able to write a judgement question assessing the efficacy of MLK’s direct action.
  • Be able to understand how they could find more information out about Eisenhower’s attitude to desegregation.
  • Be able to make inferences about the death of Emmett Till.

Key Concepts

Systems

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Innovation and revolution

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Comparison with the NSDAP police state.
  • Migration of Romans and Normans to Britain.
  • Slavery and race relations within the British Empire.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What were the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Act designed to acheive?
  • How did the police treat African Americans?
  • Why was lynching tolerated?
  • Were African Americans more likely to be incacerated than their white peers?
  • How successful have the responses to the death of Eric Garner and George Floyd been?
  • Does the election of Trump and then Biden support MLK’s ‘the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice’?
  • Who migrated to Britain after World War Two?
  • Who were the passengers of the Empire Windrush and what were they looking for?
  • What was the impact of the Empire Windrush on Britain?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to make inferences about the reasons for the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Act.
  • Be able to state the differences between two interpretations looking at police treatment of African Americans.
  • Be able to make a judgement about the success of the BLM movement.
  • Be able to state key features about the presidencies of Obama and Trump.
  • Be able to make inferences about why people migrated to Britain after World War Two.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining the impact of the Empire Windrush on Britain.

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Oliver Cromwell in Ireland.
  • British involvement in World War One.
  • The origins of the British Empire – Roanoke, Trade, Prestige

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why did the English conquer Ireland?
  • What did the British do to relieve the Irish Famine?
  • Why did the Irish rebel over British rule in 1916?
  • Why was the island of Ireland split in 1921?
  • What were both sides attempting to achieve during the Troubles?
  • Was Bloody Sunday (1972) a war crime?
  • Was the IRA right to commit the Brighton Hotel bombing (1984)?
  • Why was India the Jewel in the Crown?
  • What contributions did Indians make to the British war effort in World War Two?
  • Why did so many people die during Partition?
  • Why did India help East Pakistan secede?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to write a narrative account of the English involvement in Ireland until 1900.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of a source for explaining the causes of the Easter Rising.
  • Be able to understand how they could try to find more information out about the causes of the Troubles.
  • Be able to write a concise judgement paragraph about the actions of the British on Bloody Sunday.
  • Be able to identify the key features of the Good Friday Agreement.
  • Be able to identify relevant information to explain why Britain was involved in India.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of the role of India in World War Two.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining why so many people died during Partition.
  • Be able to state the differences between interpretations of the Indian involvement in East Pakistan.

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The treatment of women in the medieval period.
  • (RE) Attitudes to women in marriage, attitudes to contraception and the sanctity of life.
  • The destruction caused by the Holocaust and World War Two.
  • British colonial influence in India, Ireland receding.
  • The use of media to abolish slavery in UK.
  • The use of media in the BLM movement.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was Second Wave feminism?
  • What impact did the Feminine Mystique have?
  • Why did women have to fight for equal pay and access to abortion?
  • Why was the European Union formed and why did Britain join?
  • What benefits did the European Membership give Britons?
  • Who were the Eurosceptics?
  • How was the migration debate portrayed in the media?
  • Should Britain rejoin the European Union?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to state the key features of Second Wave Feminism.
  • Be able to state differences on the role of women in the mid-Twentieth century.
  • Be able to make inferences from sources about the Equal Pay Act and people’s attitude to Abortion.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of the European Union in the Twentieth Century.
  • Be able to identify relevant material about migration to Britain.
  • Be able to use sources to make inferences about the British attitudes to migration.
  • Be able to write a judgement essay on the possibility of Britain re-joining the European Union.

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Module 1

Read
Introduction to Ancient Rome

Listen
The Birth of Egypt

Module 2

Read
Introduction to Ancient Rome

Module 3

Read
How do Muslims view the Crusades?

Module 4

Read
Contested Objects – The Benin Bronzes

Read
What is the impact of an ageing population?

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Module 1

Module 2

Read
How did Elizabeth I defend herself from the Spanish Armada?

Listen
The history of the Restoration 1660

Module 3

Read
National Archives: The Transatlantic Slave Trade

Module 4

Read
What were the negative effects of the Industrial Revolution?

Read
Urban change in London

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Watch
How did the Holocaust happen?

Watch
Rise of the Nazis

Module 3

Read
Jesse Jackson and the Rainbow Coalition

Module 4

Read
Jesse Jackson and the Rainbow Coalition

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ks4 history

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Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The difference between natural and supernatural treatments
  • Hippocrates, Galen, the church and the Theory of the Four Humours
  • Miasma theory
  • Dominance of Theory of Four Humours
  • Hospital care, barber surgeons, wise women, apothecaries and physicians including approaches to treatment and prevention
  • Why was there continuity in Medicine?
  • Introduction to Factor essays
  • Dealing with the Black Death; approaches to treatment and prevention
  • The Black Death – source analysis.
  • Class planning ‘Supernatural beliefs dominated…’ Factor essay.
  • The Renaissance period and its implications for medicine and science
  • Continuity and change in ideas about the cause of disease
  • The Renaissance period and its implications for medicine and science
  • Continuity and change in ideas about the cause of disease including the printing press, Royal Society and Thomas Sydneham
  • Class planning ‘There was more continuity than change…’
  • Harvey and Vesalius

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I identify key features of medicine in Medieval Britain?
  • Can I explain why the Theory of the Four humours continued to dominate natural ideas about the cause of disease and illness?
  • Can I explain why there was continuity in the ideas about the cause of disease during the Middle Ages?
  • Can I evaluate the significance of the Theory of the Four Humours?
  • Can I describe the work of medieval medics? – Can I explain the different approaches to treatments and preventions
  • Can I explain the approaches to treatment and prevention when dealing with the Black Death?
  • Can I explain the changes that took place in England during the Renaissance period?
  • Can I explain why there was continuity and change in the ideas about the cause of disease and illness during the Renaissance period?
  • Can I evaluate the impact of Thomas Sydenham and the Royal Society?
  • Can I explain why there was some change in the ideas about the cause of disease and illness during the Renaissance period?
  • Can I explain why there was continuity and change in the approaches to prevention and Treatment during the Renaissance?
  • Can I explain why Harvey was important in improving medical knowledge during the Renaissance period?
  • Can I evaluate the significance of individuals to medical developments during the Renaissance?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to the laissez faire attitudes of government.
  • Reference to the Black Death as taught in Year 7, the medical techniques taught in Year 8.
  • Reference to the importance of the Renaissance and Reformation, including the printing press.
  • Discussion surrounding the importance of God and the role of the church in society.
  • Enure sentence starters and historical skills learned at KS3 are maintained.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Closing of the monasteries, hospital care and development in medical schools
  • Approaches to understanding and dealing with the Great Plague prevention and treatment
  • Explain why there was developments in dealing with epidemics during the
  • Great Plague – class planning
  • Revision to date and ‘very little change’ essay.
  • Medieval and Renaissance medicine revision
  • Very little development judgement essay class planning.
  • The significance of Jenner’s smallpox vaccination and its impact
  • Jenner judgement essay.
  • Pasteur’s Germ Theory and Robert Koch
  • The significance of Florence Nightingale and developments in hospital care
  • Video and Crimean War
  • The impact of anesthetics and antiseptics on surgery
  • Developments in vaccination

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain why there was limited provisions for hospital care in Renaissance England?
  • Can I explain the developments in dealing with epidemics during the Renaissance period?
  • Can I evaluate the developments in dealing with epidemics during the Renaissance period
  • Can I explain the medical developments between c1250-1700?
  • Can I evaluate the medical developments between c1250-1700?
  • Can I explain the significance of Jenner’s smallpox vaccination?
  • Can I evaluate the significance of Jenner’s smallpox vaccination?
  • Can I explain the significance of Pasteur’s Germ Theory?
  • Can I evaluate the significance of Pasteur’s Germ Theory?
  • Can I explain the developments in hospital care that took place during the period c1700-1900?
  • Can I evaluate the developments in hospital care that took place during the period c1700-1900?
  • Can I explain the developments of anesthetics and antiseptics in surgery during industrial Britain?
  • Can I explain the contribution of Pasteur to vaccinations?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to reaction to the Black Death
  • References to medieval ideas about causes and treatment of disease.
  • Reference to theory of Four Humours.
  • Reference to medieval hospitals and barber surgeons.
  • Reference to transference.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • John Snow and dealing with Cholera
  • Developments in public health and the reasons for the Public Health Act 1975
  • Revision: 1700-1900 timeline lesson
  • Magic bullets and penicillin
  • The impact of the NHS
  • Improvements in diagnosis, developments in genetics and understanding of lifestyle factors
  • The fight against lung cancer including methods of diagnosis, treatment and prevention

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain the significance of the cholera epidemics of 1832-54?
  • Can I explain the significance of John Snow?
  • Can I evaluate the significance of John Snow’s work in preventing the spread of epidemics?
  • Can I explain the reasons for the Public Health Act 1875?
  • Can I evaluate the reasons for the Public Health Act 1875?
  • Can I consolidate my understanding of the medical developments within the period c1700-1900?
  • Can I explain the significance of magic bullets to medical treatments in the 20th century?
  • Can I explain how the development of penicillin led to rapid progress in the treatment of infection?
  • Can I evaluate the factors in the development of antibiotics?
  • Can I explain the impact of the NHS on approaches to prevention and treatment in Britain?
  • Can I evaluate the impact of the NHS on approaches to prevention and treatment in Britain?
  • Can I explain the development of high-tech medical and surgical treatments in hospitals?
  • Can I explain how developments in genetics affected medicine?
  • Can I explain the increase in promoting healthy lifestyle choices in modern Britain?
  • Can I explain why lung cancer became so prevalent in Britain during the 20th Century?
  • Can I evaluate the government’s response to lung cancer?

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The trench system
  • Key battles on the Western Front: Ypres Salient, the Somme, Arras, Cambrai and the use of mines at Hill 60
  • Problems of ill health from the trench environment; nature of wounds from riffles and explosives; problem of shrapnel; wound infection and head injuries
  • Effects of gas attacks
  • X Rays
  • Blood transfusions
  • Brain surgery and plastic surgery
  • The work of the RAMC and FANY
  • Transport and stages of evacuation

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I describe key features of the British sector of the Western Front?
  • Can I describe key features of key battles that took place on the Western Front?
  • Can I investigate the problems the terrain caused for medicine on the Western Front?
  • Can I describe the different types of injuries and medical conditions present during WWI?
  • Can I evaluate the usefulness of primary sources for an enquiry into the effects of gas attacks on the Western Front?
  • Can I recall the medical context at the beginning of WWI?
  • Can I evaluate primary sources for an inquiry into the development and use of x-rays on the Western Front?
  • Can I explain the significance of blood transfusions and splints to medical care on the Western Front?
  • Can I evaluate the developments in surgery that took place on the Western Front?
  • Can I describe the key features of the chain of evacuation?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to historical context of World War One taught in Year 8.
  • Referencing source skills used in year 9, including sentence starters, PANDA and SPED.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The problem of legitimacy, gender, marriage
  • Her character and strength
  • Elizabethan society and government in 1558
  • Challenges at home and from abroad: French threat and financial weakness
  • Religious divisions in Europe
  • Elizabeth’s religious settlement of 1559
  • The Puritans, Recusants and the Papacy
  • Mary’s claim to the throne, arrival in England and her relationship with Elizabeth
  • The Revolt of the Northern Earls
  • The Ridolfi, Throckmorton and Babington Plots
  • The work of Walsingham
  • The execution of Mary Queen of Scots.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I describe 2 features of Elizabeth’s character?
  • Can I describe 2 features of Elizabethan society and government?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the threat from France?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the Catholic Church in 1558?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the Act of Supremacy/ the Act of Uniformity/ the Royal Injunctions?
  • Can I explain why there was opposition to the Religious Settlement?
  • Can I describe 2 features of Mary Queen of Scots?
  • Can I explain why Mary Queen of Scots was a threat to Elizabeth?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the revolt of the Northern Earls?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the Ridolfi/Throckmorton/Babington Plot
  • Can I explain why Mary Queen of Scots of Executed?
  • Can I explain why the work of Walsingham was important to Elizabeth?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to continuity and change in gender roles over time
  • References to continuity and change in government over time
  • References to the geography of Europe
  • References to religious change in England since the Reformantion
  • Reference to the way governments deal with opposition – i.e Civil War

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The pirateering of Sir Francis Drake
  • Reasons for the rivalry with Spain
  • The Spanish Netherlands
  • Singeing of the King of Spain’s beard
  • Reasons for the Spanish Armada
  • Reasons why the Armada failed
  • Consequences of the English victory
  • Education and Leisure in Elizabethan England
  • Reason for the increase in poverty
  • Changing attitudes to the poor
  • Reasons why the Elizabethans explored
  • Significance of Raleigh
  • Reasons for the colonization of Virginia
  • Reasons for the failure of Virginia

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I describe 2 features of Elizabeth’s involvement in the Netherlands?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the Raid of Cadiz?
  • Can I explain why Sir Francis Drake was important to the outbreak of war with Spain?
  • Can I explain why Philip launched the Spanish Armada?
  • Can I describe 2 features of education in Elizabethan England?
  • Can I describe 2 features of leisure for: the nobility, gentry, merchants, labouring poor, theatre, sport?
  • Can I explain why leisure was an important part of life in Elizabethan England?
  • Can I describe 2 features of population increase in Elizabethan England?
  • Can I explain why Elizabethans were able to explore the New World?
  • Can I describe 2 features of the colonisation of Virginia?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Reference to role of education in shaping/defining social class and permitting social mobility
  • Reference to cross curriculuar history of sports, theatre and music in Britain
  • Reference to the role of government in determing taxation and assisting the poor.
  • Reference to the growth and end of the British Empire.

Link to prior learning

  • References to World War One and Treaty of Versailles.
  • References to democracy and PR.
  • Reference to anti-Semitism and the Holocaust.
  • Reference to paramilitary organisations.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The legacy of the First World War.
  • The abdication of the Kaiser.
  • The armistice and revolution, 1918–19.
  • The setting up of the Weimar Republic.
  • The strengths and weaknesses of the new Constitution.
  • Reasons for the early unpopularity of the Republic, including the ‘stab in the back’ theory and the key terms of the Treaty of Versailles.
  • Challenges to the Republic from Left and Right: Spartacists, Freikorps, the Kapp Putsch.
  • The challenges of 1923: hyperinflation; the reasons for, and effects of, the French occupation of the Ruhr.
  • Reasons for economic recovery, including the work of Stresemann,
    the Rentenmark, the Dawes and Young Plans and American loans and investment.
  • The impact on domestic policies of Stresemann’s achievements abroad: the Locarno Pact, joining the League of Nations and the Kellogg-Briand Pact.
  • Changes in the standard of living, including wages, housing, unemployment insurance.
  • Changes in the position of women in work, politics and leisure.
  • Cultural changes: developments in architecture, art and the cinema.
  • Hitler’s early career: joining the German Workers’ Party and setting up the Nazi Party, 1919–20.
  • The early growth and features of the Party. The Twenty-Five Point Programme.
  • The role of the SA.
  • The reasons for, events and consequences of the Munich Putsch.
  • Reasons for limited support for the Nazi Party, 1924–28.
  • Party reorganisation and Mein Kampf.
  • The Bamberg Conference of 1926.
  • The growth of unemployment – its causes and impact. The failure of successive Weimar governments to deal with unemployment from 1929 to January 1933.
  • The growth of support for the Communist Party.
  • Reasons for the growth in support for the Nazi Party, including the appeal of Hitler and the Nazis, the effects of propaganda and the work of the SA.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I understand the impact of the defeat in WWI for Germany?
  • Can I understand the key terms of the Treaty of Versailles?
  • Can I identify potential weaknesses in the Weimar Constitution?
  • Can I understand why some parties did not support German democracy?
  • Can I explain the events of the Spartacist Uprising and the Kapp Putsch and understand why they made the Weimar government look weak?
  • Can I understand the consequences of Germany’s weak financial state 1922-23
  • Can I understand the causes of Germany’s hyperinflation and its consequences?
  • Can I explain the actions that Stresemann took to solve hyperinflation and the reaction to it?
  • Can I explain how culture in Germany developed in the 1920s and how WWI fed into it?
  • Can I explain why the NSDAP would have found some of these changes ‘degenerate’?
  • Can I understand how the standard of living improved during the Golden Years?
  • Can I understand the impact that WWI, defeat and the crises 1918-1923 had on Hitler?
  • Can I explain why Hitler wanted to take over Germany and the events of the Munich Putsch?
  • Can I understand how Stresemann’s actions influenced the army’s decision?
  • Can I understand how Hitler used the trial and his time in prison to better the NSDAP?
  • Can I understand the causes and consequences of the Wall Street Crash for Germany?
  • Can I explain why the mainstream parties were unable to solve Germany’s problems?
  • Can I understand the appeal of the NSDAP at this time, and conflict with the Communists?
  • Can I explain why Brüning called an early election and the consequences of it?
  • Can I explain why Hitler was appointed Chancellor in January 1933?
  • Can I explain how he consolidated his power (Reichstag Fire, March Election, Enabling Act)?
  • Can I explain why Röhm and leading SA men were assassinated?
  • Can I describe the makeup and impact of the NSDAP Police State?
  • Can I understand the concepts of Volksgemeinschaft and Gleichschaltung?
  • Can I explain how Hitler dealt with the Christian churches?

Link to prior learning

  • References to impact of hyperinflation.
  • Reference to democracy and suffrage.
  • Reference to paramilitary groups in Northern Ireland.
  • Reference to the ECHR.
  • Reference to Elizabeth’s use of art as propaganda.
  • Reference to Reformation and Protestantism.
  • Reference to GLF, Holocaust and Civil Rights Movement.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Political developments in 1932. The roles of Hindenburg, Brüning,
    von Papen and von Schleicher.
  • The part played by Hindenburg and von Papen in Hitler becoming Chancellor in 1933.
  • The Reichstag Fire. The Enabling Act and the banning of other parties and trade unions.
  • The threat from Röhm and the SA, the Night of the Long Knives and the death of von Hindenburg.
  • Hitler becomes Führer, the army and oath of allegiance.
  • The role of the Gestapo, the SS, the SD and concentration camps.
  • Nazi control of the legal system, judges and law courts.
  • Nazi policies towards the Catholic and Protestant Churches, including the Reich Church and the Concordat.
  • Goebbels and the Ministry of Propaganda: censorship, Nazi use of media, rallies and sport, including the Berlin Olympics (1936).
  • Nazi control of culture and the arts, including art, architecture, literature and film.
  • The extent of support for the Nazi regime.
  • Opposition from the Churches, including the role of Pastor Niemöller.
  • Opposition from the young, including the Swing Youth and the Edelweiss Pirates.
  • Nazi views on women and the family.
  • Nazi policies towards women, including marriage and family, employment and appearance.
  • Nazi aims and policies towards the young. The Hitler Youth and the League of German Maidens.
  • Nazi control of the young through education, including the curriculum and teachers.
  • Nazi policies to reduce unemployment, including labour service, autobahns, rearmament and invisible unemployment.
  • Changes in the standard of living, especially of German workers.
  • The Labour Front, Strength Through Joy, Beauty of Labour.
  • Nazi racial beliefs and policies and the treatment of minorities:
    Slavs, ‘gypsies’, homosexuals and those with disabilities.
  • The persecution of the Jews, including the boycott of Jewish shops
    and businesses (1933), the Nuremberg Laws and Kristallnacht.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I understand the causes and consequences of the Wall Street Crash for Germany?
  • Can I explain why the mainstream parties were unable to solve Germany’s problems?
  • Can I understand the appeal of the NSDAP at this time, and conflict with the Communists?
  • Can I explain why Brüning called an early election and the consequences of it?
  • Can I explain why Hitler was appointed Chancellor in January 1933?
  • Can I explain how he consolidated his power (Reichstag Fire, March Election, Enabling Act)?
  • Can I explain why Röhm and leading SA men were assassinated?
  • Can I describe the makeup and impact of the NSDAP Police State?
  • Can I understand the concepts of Volksgemeinschaft and Gleichschaltung?
  • Can I explain how Hitler dealt with the Christian churches?
  • Can I describe opposition to the NSDAP and explain why it was limited?
  • Can I understand the reasoning behind NSDAP policies for Women and Youth?
  • Can I explain the purpose of the activities of the HJ and BDM?
  • Can I understand why some youth resisted the NSDAP and explain how successful they were?
  • Can I explain the impact of NSDAP policies on the standard of living in Germany?
  • Can I understand the reasons for NSDAP anti-Semitism?
  • Can I describe the escalation of anti-Semitic actions 33-39?

Link to prior learning

  • References to World War Two studies of Germany and the Holocaust.
  • References to Year 9 Studies of Imperial Russia and the Russian Revolutions of 1917.
  • References to the League of Nations and United Nations.
  • Reference to the political spectrum.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The Grand Alliance and the outcomes of the Tehran, Yalta and Potsdam conferences.
  • The ideological differences between the superpowers and the attitudes of Stalin, Truman and Churchill.
  • The impact on US-Soviet relations of the development of the atomic bomb, the Long and Novikov telegrams and the creation of Soviet satellite states in Eastern Europe.
  • The impact on US-Soviet relations of the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan, 1947.
  • The significance of Cominform (1947), Comecon (1949) and the formation of NATO (1949).
  • Berlin: its division into zones. The Berlin Crisis (blockade and airlift) of 1948-49 and its impact.
  • The formation of the Federal Republic of Germany and German Democratic Republic.
  • The significance of the arms race. The formation of the Warsaw Pact.
  • Events in 1956 leading to the Hungarian Uprising, and Khrushchev’s response.
  • The international reaction to the Soviet invasion of Hungary.
  • The refugee problem in Berlin, Khrushchev’s Berlin ultimatum (1958), and the summit meetings of 1959–61.
  • Soviet relations with Cuba, the Cuban Revolution and the refusal of the USA to recognise Castro’s government. The significance of the Bay of Pigs incident.
  • Opposition in Czechoslovakia to Soviet control: the Prague Spring.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain the importance of the Grand Alliance and the World War Two conferences.
  • Can I explain why there was tension between Communist and Capitalist leaders?
  • Can I evaluate the reaction of the USSR to the use of the Atomic Bomb by the USA?
  • Can I explain the impact of the Truman Doctrine and the Marshall Plan?
  • Can I explain the purpose of Comonform, Comecon and the Warsaw Pact?
  • Can I explain the division of Germany and Berlin and the subsequent Blockade and Airlift?
  • Can I explain the reasons for the Hungarian Uprising and Khrushcev’s reaction to it?
  • Can I evaluate the differing international responses to the Soviet response to the Hungarian Uprising?
  • Can I explain why Republikflucht was such a problem for the GDR and the reasoning behind the Soviet Ultimatum?
  • Can I evaluate the impact the Berlin Wall?
  • Can I explain American – Cuban relations and Castro’s move to the USSR?
  • Can I explain the events of the Cuban Missile Crisis?
  • Can I explain Czechoslovakis’ ‘Socialism with a Human Face’ and the problem it posed Brezhnev?
  • Can I explain how the USSR responded to Prague Spring?

Link to prior learning

  • References to the development of Atomic and Hydrogen bombs.
  • References to the USSR’s actions in Hungary and Prague and the international response.
  • References to de-Stalinisation.
  • References to resistance to NSDAP rule in Germany.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Attempts at arms control: the Limited Test Ban Treaty (1963); the Outer Space Treaty (1967); and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968).
  • International reaction to Soviet measures in Czechoslovakia.
  • Détente in the 1970s, SALT 1, Helsinki, and SALT 2.
  • The significance of Reagan and Gorbachev’s changing attitudes.
  • Gorbachev’s ‘new thinking’ and the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Force (INF) Treaty (1987).
  • The significance of the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan, the Carter Doctrine and the Olympic boycotts.
  • Reagan and the ‘Second Cold War’, the Strategic Defence Initiative.
  • The impact of Gorbachev’s ‘new thinking’ on Eastern Europe: the loosening Soviet grip on Eastern Europe.
  • The significance of the fall of the Berlin Wall.
  • The collapse of the Soviet Union and its significance in bringing about the end of the Warsaw Pact.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain attempts at arms reduction?
  • Can I describe the key features of détente?
  • Can I explain the approaches of Reagan and Gorbachev?
  • Can I describe the reasons for the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and the international reaction to it, including Olympic Boycotts?
  • Can I evaluate the impact of Reagan’s Evil Empire approach and ‘Star Wars’?
  • Can I explain the impact of loosening control in Eastern Europe?
  • Can I evaluate the successes of Perestroika and Glasnost?
  • Can I explain the significance of the collapse of the Soviet Union in Russia and the Warsaw Pact countries?

Module 5 – Revision

Module 6 – Exams