Design & Technology

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ks3 design & technology

Our vision is to provide students with the powerful knowledge base required to become effective critical thinkers who are able to construct Design solutions to existing problems. Students will follow the iterative nature of effective Design processes, continually refining and improving their work through theoretical and practical application to help prepare them to become effective problem solvers.

MYP Assessment Criteria

Criterion A

Research

Criterion B

Design

Criterion C

Create

Criterion D

Evaluate

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Reflection on healthy dishes can impact community wellness

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the eatwell guide?
  • What are the food groups?
  • What are nutrients?
  • How do we use nutrients in the body?
  • What is Health and Safety in the food room?
  • What is personal Hygiene?
  • What is cross contamination?
  • What is the design cycle?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify examples of food groups
  • Make a range of foods
  • Measure out using scales and other units
  • Combine ingredients by mixing, blending, kneading
  • Use the method of frying and baking to transfer heat
  • Adapt ingredients in a recipe
  • Complete taste test analysis to help develop ideas
  • Create a healthy breakfast blog

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Engineers are able to communicate new ideas through experimentation and testing

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is aerodynamics?
  • What are emerging materials in the automotive industry?
  • What is ACCESS FM?
  • What is the Design Cycle?
  • What are examples of manufactured board
  • What are timbers?
  • What is a car chassis?
  • What are motors and gears?
  • What is an input and output?
  • What is technical marking out?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • How to design an aerodynamic car
  • How to mark out accurately?
  • Use a bench hook to hold timber in place
  • Be able to use a coping saw and tenon saw
  • Be able to apply finishing techniques
  • Be able to add fixings to a material
  • Create a mini motored car
  • Use gear knowledge to write a technical description
  • Explain how input and output instructions control a product
  • Mark out accurately with a trisquare, pencil and metal rule

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Marketing can influence thinking through communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the design cycle?
  • What is a Tote bag?
  • What is CAM?
  • What is hand sewing?
  • What is machine sewing?
  • What is a natural fabric?
  • What is a synthetic fabric?
  • What is surface decoration?
  • What is a logo?
  • What is safe use of a sewing machine?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Write a research plan
  • Complete ACCESS FM research on an existing product
  • Conduct independent research to inform designs
  • Create two initial designs for a superhero tote bag
  • Draw a final design with front and back views
  • Use measurements on design work
  • Label design work with material choice, decoration information and structure
  • Manufacture the tote bag
  • Embroider onto the tote bag using CAM

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Use of electronic systems influence our everyday life

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is an electronic circuit?
  • What is an input?
  • What is an output?
  • What are components
  • What is solder
  • What is a sensor

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Make an electronic circuit
  • Create a google site on electricity and how it is applied in everyday life

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Does global development utilise its resources to create fair and sustainable systems

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is seasonal cooking?
  • What are seasonal foods?
  • What are the implications of not buying local foods?
  • What is healthy eating?
  • What are nutrients?
  • What does our body need nutrients for?
  • What is heat transfer?
  • What is sensory analysis?
  • What are savoury foods?
  • What are existing products in relation to food?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use sensory analysis star chart to evaluate success of dishes
  • Be able to adapt recipes with seasonality in mind
  • Use the method of boiling, frying and baking to transfer heat
  • Use food preparation skills by slicing , chopping and dicing.
  • Measure out using scales and other units
  • Combine ingredients by mixing, blending, kneading
  • Use a range of skills and food preparation methods in a final food dish
  • Create healthy savoury dishes
  • Be able to write an evaluation and sensory analysis using keywords
  • Use ACCESS FM to analysis a food product

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

We need to make changes to become more sustainable

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is user centred design?
  • What are the UN global goals?
  • What is a model?
  • What is a prototype?
  • What is safe use of craft knife
  • What is 3D modelling?
  • What is an electrical circuit?
  • What is architecture?
  • What is sustainable design?
  • What are new and emerging technologies in construction?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • How to test and evaluate a design idea?
  • Be able to select tools and methods of manufacture to make a models
  • Be able to prototype a range of ideas in card
  • Draw floor plans for the building
  • Use technical drawing techniques – scale, isometric to communicate ideas
  • Use google sketchup when designing in 3D
  • Analyse past work of Architects – use ACCESS FM
  • Be able to create an electric loop light circuit
  • Consider sustainable materials and approaches to design

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Communication of an idea can be inspired by global influences

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is biomimicry?
  • What is structural integrity?
  • What are components in a product?
  • What are brands?
  • What materials are shoes made from?
  • What is an accessory?
  • What is a manufacturing Specification?
  • What is tolerance?
  • What is 2D design?
  • What is tessellation?
  • What is CAD/CAM

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Describe what biomimicry is
  • Be inspired by biomimicry
  • Design components of a shoe
  • Create a logo and design brand
  • Identify correct materials for a shoe
  • Write a manufacturing specification
  • Work within a tolerance when manufacturing
  • Create fabric samples
  • Test and evaluate accessory designs
  • Use Techsoft design tools when designing
  • Create an accessory using CAD/CAM
  • Set up and use a sewing machine safely

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Community identity and local culture influence trends

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are cultural foods?
  • What is food hygiene and safety?
  • What is food processing?
  • What are different diets?
  • What are micronutrients?
  • What are macronutrients?
  • How do our bodies process nutrients?
  • What are restaurant existing products?
  • What is research in the catering industry?
  • What is a budget for a food dish?
  • What is a project brief?
  • What is a time plan?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use a range of skills and food preparation methods in dishes
  • Be able to make a vegetable stir fry
  • Explain and justify why it is important to consider food provenance
  • Be able to adapt recipes according to availability of ingredients
  • Be able to design a dish according to a dietary need
  • Use food health and safety measures within the food room.
  • Be able to explain healthy eating choices
  • Be able to describe a range of different dietary requirements
  • Research local restaurants menus
  • Identify a range of world dishes
  • Write a menu for a restaurant
  • Write a time plan for a making a dish

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

How can designers use evaluation and adaptation to reduce waste globally to develop more sustainable communities.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the difference between hard and soft wood?
  • What are the differences between, Acrylic, HDP and polyurethane
  • What is upcycling?
  • What are the 6 Rs?
  • What is user centered design?
  • What is a specification?
  • What is a brief?
  • What is sustainable material choice?
  • What is prototyping?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify a problem from research.
  • Explain what upcycling is
  • Be able to source own items to upcycle
  • Independently identify and select materials and equipment.
  • Be able to use workshop machinery
  • Work with a range of materials
  • Be able to consider the properties of materials when manufacturing
  • Create a one off upcycled piece of work

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

We develop and adapt existing products in the style of pop art to show personal and cultural expression through design work.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is user centred design?
  • What is a brief?
  • What are resist dye techniques?
  • What are natural fabrics?
  • What are synthetic fabrics?
  • What is top stitching?
  • What is quilting?
  • What is Computer Aided Embroidery design?
  • What is a motif?
  • What is a pattern for manufacture?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Conduct research to inform design approach
  • Complete a survey to inform design work
  • Create resist dye fabric samples
  • Write a design brief
  • Write a technical design specification
  • Choose appropriate materials for manufacture
  • Use sewing machine independently
  • Sew accurately and check tolerance
  • Use computerised sewing machine to add CAD embroidery

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Embedding intelligence in design of products

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are examples of embedding intelligence into products?
  • What is a sensor?
  • What is an actuator?
  • What is a microcontroller?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Write an article / blog entry about products that have embedded intelligence
  • Create a program to instruct a robot
  • Write a flow chart of instructions that include movement, senses and controls

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Sustainable bags

Read
Origins of the Tote bag

Read
Canvas bags history

Read
Nutrition labels

Watch
Aerodynamics: The Basics

Watch
Aerodynamics: Turbulence, Drag and Vortices

Watch
Aerodynamics: Slots, Diffusers, Bargeboards, S-duct

Watch
Careers in Aerodynamics

Watch
Healthy Eating: An introduction for children aged 5-11

Modules 3 & 4

Personal Branding

Read: Tote Bag Design
Sustainable bags
Origins of the Tote bag
Canvas bags history

Watch: Healthy Eating
Healthy Eating: An Introduction for Children aged 5-11

Read: Nutrition Label
Food Labels

Read: How to create a Google Site
Google Sites

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Emergency Shelter Design

Read
Emergency packages

Read
Make your own protein bars

Read
Freeze dried foods

Modules 3 & 4

Sustainability

Read: Shelters – Architecture
Norman Foster: Emergency Shelter Design

Watch
What is Architecture?
How to model a house in SketchUp Free

Read: Emergency Foods
Unicef Emergency Packages
Protein Bars – Make your own

Read
Freeze dried foods – Space foods
Space Food

Read
How is climate linked to extreme weather?

Watch
What are hurricanes, typhoons and tropical cyclones?

Read: Lunch Packaging
What is sublimation?

Watch
Textile Printing

Click on the links below to view the videos and resources for the extension activities.

Modules 1 & 2

Read
Iconic Lamps

Read
Food Standards Agency

Read
Food & Nutrition

Watch
Upcycling

Watch
How Pasta is Made

Watch
How to Make Pasta Without a Machine

Watch
What is Quorn?

Watch
BTEC Sport Careers: Nutritionist

Watch
The boy who harnessed the wind

Modules 3 & 4

The Real World

Read: Lamp Design
Iconic Lamps
Electronics
Timbers

Watch
Simple Machines: Levers

How to light a space
Benefits of LED Lighting

Watch
Upcycling

The boy who harnessed the wind

Read: Food & Nutrition
Food Standard Agency

Watch
Pasta Making
Making Pasta without a machine
What is Quorn?
Sports Nutrition

back to ks4 subjects

ks4 design & technology

link to specification

Principles of Design and Technology

Identifying requirements and Materials considerations

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Learned about softwoods, hardwoods and manufactured boards in year 9.
  • All year groups will learn to analyse using ACCESS FM.
  • Maths based questions are learned in DT as well as in their maths lessons.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are softwoods?
  • What are hardwoods?
  • What are manufactured boards?
  • What is ACCESS FM?
  • How does injection moulding work?
  • How does blow moulding work?
  • How to use isometric paper.
  • What is a ration?
  • What is a fraction?
  • What is a percentage?
  • How is surface area calculated?
  • How is volume calculated?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To explain how a passive amplifier works/is used.
  • To be be able to understand why finishes are applied to products.
  • To provide appropriate finishes to woods.
  • To be able to create thumbnail sketches and to then further develop these. into a final solution.
  • To be able to prototype using materials and equipment such as card, craft knife,safety rule and a glue gun.
  • To understand the difference between one-off, batch, mass and continuous productions with examples of products.

Principles of Design and Technology

Learning from existing products and practice

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Link to year 9 upcycling project when working with plastics.
  • Methods of production is touched on in year 9 when looking at bread.
  • Mini keyring practical during M1 so students have some knowledge of using copings saws and files in the workshop.
  • Working safely in the workshop from all previous practical lessons.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a thermoplastic?
  • What is a thermosetting plastics?
  • Why are materials protected?
  • How do you calculate percentages?
  • What are the different types of papers and boards?
  • What is one-off production?
  • What is batch production?
  • What is mass production?
  • What is continuous production?
  • What is JIT production?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to change the blade on a coping saw.
  • To be able to use a tenon saw with a bench hook.
  • To be able to use files safely.
  • To be able to use sandpaper and wet and dry paper appropriately.
  • To be able to apply wood stain and wood varnish.

Principles of Design and Technology

Manufacturing processes and Techniques

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students will have previously covered ferrous and non-ferrous metals and their properties.
  • Students have also covered alloys as part of year 9 Product design.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is pewter casting?
  • What is vacuum moulding?
  • What is laser cutting?
  • What is a ferrous metal?
  • What is a non-ferrous metal?
  • What are the properties of pewter?
  • What are the properties of MDF?
  • What are the properties of Acrylic?
  • What are the properties of Plywood?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to use the vacuum former.
  • Be able to manufacture a mould.
  • To be able to apply graphics to packaging.
  • To be able to use 2D design to draw basic designs.
  • To understand how the laser cutter works.
  • To be able to use anthropometric data and apply to a product (sunglasses)

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Link to learning of prior materials. Understand that all materials have different properties which make them ideal for different uses.
  • Students to be able to identify the correct material for a given context.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are modern materials?
  • What are smart materials?
  • What are composite materials?
  • What are the main categories of material properties?
  • What are stock forms?
  • How can you ensure the structural integrity of a product?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To work firsthand with smart materials (polymorph).
  • To understand what dysgraphia is and think of a possible solution.
  • To understand stock forms and the benefits and limitations of stock forms.
  • Understand product safety measures and product testing.

Principles of Design and Technology

Implications of wider issues and Design thinking and communication

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Linked to science lessons on forces at KS3.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the main types of motion and forces?
  • What are microcontrollers?
  • What are inputs?
  • What are outputs?
  • What are tolerances?
  • What is wastage?
  • What is addition?
  • What is rapid prototyping?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To be able to identify different types of motion.
  • To work with materials where addition and wastage is used.
  • To understand the concept of input and outputs (microcontrollers).

Link to prior learning

  • Linked to passive amplifier project, chocolate project, sunglasses project and jewellery project.
  • All students given a context to research, analyse and create a solution for.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is primary research?
  • What is secondary research?
  • What is collaboration?
  • What is user-centered design?
  • What is a design brief?
  • What is a design specification?
  • What is a client profile?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students will be able to identify and prioritise problems and opportunities that are relevant to their chosen context.
  • Be able to write a design brief in response to a contextual challenge that considers the stakeholders that could have an interest in the potential outcome.
  • Be able to disassemble an existing product.
  • To develop at least one prototype that responds to the needs and/or wants and is fit for purpose.

READ THE OCR SPECIFICATION

  • Identify requirements: Context based inquiry 
  • Learn from existing products: Investigate and analyse products
  • Design thinking and communication: Identify and formulate a specification

Principles of Design and Technology

Identify requirements and learn from existing products

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Learned about softwoods, hardwoods and manufactured boards in year 9.
  • All year groups will learn to analyse using ACCESS FM.
  • Maths based questions are learned in DT as well as in their maths lessons.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are existing products 
  • Analysis of existing products
  • Who are the stakeholders of the NEA context
  • What is a design specification
  • What is a LCA (Life Cycle Analysis)
  • Material characteristics linked to product designing
  • What is communication in design
  • What is an exploded view of a product

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Find existing products relevant to the NEA
  • Conduct primary research 
  • Use ACCESS FM to write a design specification
  • Select appropriate materials and components for the product designed
  • Draw design ideas by hand and using CAD
  • Use feedback to develop designs
  • Design thinking: Use a range of design strategies, create prototypes and communicate ideas
  • Implications of wider issues: Sustainable design 
  • Material considerations: Select and work with appropriate materials
  • Technical understanding: Use technical principles

Principles of Design and Technology

Design thinking and communication, Consider wider issues and Material considerations

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students experience a mini NEA project in the first year of the course and have an understanding of iterative design work.  
  • Have an understanding of 3D modelling with papers and boards
  • Iterative design approach in units offered
  • Manufacturing textiles products throughout KS3

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is iterative design
  • Material characteristics of paper and board
  • Stock forms of paper and board
  • What is sustainable use of materials
  • What are the joining methods for material choice
  • What are modern materials
  • Fabrics and finishing techniques
  • Controlled movement

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Create a 3D module of the design idea
  • Use of standard components
  • Use tessellation on material to create a lay plan
  • Consider motion, forces and mechanical elements of design
  • Manufacturing processes and techniques: Use of specialist equipment to shape / create final solution
  • Viability of design solutions: Developmental testing of the design

Principles of Design and Technology

Manufacturing processes and techniques and Viability of design solutions

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students experience a mini NEA project in the first year of the course and have an understanding of iterative design work.  
  • Accurately marking out materials 
  • 3 dimensional drawing and orthographic projection
  • Experienced workshop manufacturing throughout KS3

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Structural integrity in a product
  • Accuracy in design and manufacture
  • What is scale in design communication
  • Accuracy in manufacture
  • What is the key equipment and machinery for chosen material areas

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Calculate quantities of materials
  • Consider material wastage
  • Use of mathematics to calculate components of a design
  • Use fractions and ratio to communicate designs 
  • Use of marking out techniques 
  • Create a plan of make for design
  • Viability of design solutions: Critically evaluate the solution and use feedback to identify potential further development

Principles of Design and Technology

Viability of design solutions

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students experience a mini NEA project in the first year of the course and have an understanding of the iterative design process. 
  • Testing and evaluation of design and manufacturing development
  • Evaluation of final solution
  • Workshop manufacture with a range of materials

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Processes used to form or shape materials
  • Material joining methods 
  • What are the production processes used in the material choice for design
  • What is product testing

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • How can the materials be joined
  • How can material be shaped
  • Complete a range of tests on the solution
  • Gain stakeholder feedback 
  • Evaluate the success of the product