KS4 Religious Education

Module 1 - Muslim Beliefs: Marriage & The Family

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The naure of Islam in Britain and the Shi’a Sunni split.
  • The Six Beliefs and Five Roots and their importance for Muslims today, including different Shi’a communities.
  • The nature of Allah – Tawhid, immanence, transcendence, omnipotence, benevolence, justice.
  • The nature and importance of Prophets, Kutub and Malaikah.
  • The nature and importance of al-Qadr, free-will, judgement and beliefs about life after death.
  • The importance and purpose of marriage in Islam and non-Islamic points of view.
  • The importance of sexual relationships in Islam and non-Islamic points of view.
  • Islamic and non-Islamic teachings about homosexuality and sex outside of marriage.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain the nature of Allah in Islam?
  • Can I explain how the Six Beliefs and Five Roots affect Muslims?
  • Can I evaluate the importance of scripture to Muslims?
  • Can I explain why beliefs about Angels, the afterlife and predestination are important for Muslims?
  • Can I explain why marriage is important and Islam and the purpose of marriage for Muslims today?
  • Can I explain why Muslims and non-Muslims have differing views of homosexuality and sex outside of marriage?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to the nature of God in Islam and Christianity
  • References to the expereicence of being a Muslim in Britain today.
  • The importance of the prophets in Islam and Christianity
  • The Qur’an, Hadith, Sunnah and Surah (SoA).
  • Islamic concepts of life after death, judgement, resurrection, heavan and hell – links to Christian and Jewish beliefs.
Module 2 - Marriage & The Family: Living The Muslim Life

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Muslim teaching about the importance of the Ummah for the family.
  • Muslim responses to the different types of family in modern Britain and non-Muslim attitudes.
  • The significance of Muslims rites of passage, worship, classes, groups and how this strengthens the Ummah.
  • Muslim and non-Muslim attitudes to contraception and situational ethics concering family planning.
  • Muslim and non-Muslim attitudes to divorce, including rituals and remarriage – links to situational ethics.
  • The importance of gender equality in the family and Muslim teachings about gender predudice and discrimination.
  • Examples of gender roles and attitudes at the time of the prophet.
  • The Ten Obligatory Acts, differences between Sunni and Shi’a practice – links to the Five Pillars.
  • The nature, role and importance of Shahadah for Muslims and its importance today.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain why the support of the Ummah is helpful for Muslim families?
  • Can I explain the importance of ritual to Muslims today (adhan, aqiqah, khitan)?
  • Can I evaluate the Muslim and non-Muslim attitudes to contraception, family planning, divorce and remarriage – with re: situational ethics?
  • Can I assess gender roles within Islam and non-Muslim society?
  • Can I effecitively compare non-Muslim views on Marriage and the Family in Britain today with Islamic views?
  • Can I explain the Ten Obligatory Acts and the importance of the Shahadah for Muslims today?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to understanding of Allah, the Ummah and community.
  • References to Christians and non-religious attitudes to marriage, contraception and situational ethics.
  • Reference to gender equality in modern British society.
  • Reference to the Six Beliefs and Five Pillars.
Module 3 - Living The Muslim Life

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The nature, history and pupose of Salah for Muslims today.
  • The divergenent Sunni and Shi’a beliefs.
  • How Salah is performed at home and in the Mosque.
  • The importance of Sawm, including the Night of Power and the reasons people can be excused from fasting.
  • The importance of Zakah and Khums for Sunni/Shi’a Muslims.
  • The benefit of receiving Zakah or Khums.
  • The importance of Hajj as one of the Five Pillars.
  • The imporatnce, and meaning of Jihad within Islam.
  • The difference between lesser and greater Jihad and its importance for Muslims.
  • The impotance of Id-ul-Adhr, Id-ul-Fitr, Id-ul-Ghadeer and Ashura.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain the significance of Salah for Muslims?
  • Can I explain why the importance and difference in performing Salah in the Mosque?
  • Can I explain the importance of Jummah?
  • Can I explain why fasting is important for Muslims and the historic significance?
  • Can I explain why Zakah/Khums is important to Muslims?
  • Can I explain the difference between lesser and greater Jihad and the conditions for lesser Jihad?
  • Can I explain the importance of celebrations and commemorations for Muslims?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The Six Beliefs and Five Roots.
  • The Sunni Shi’a split.
  • The role of the mosque and the ummah in the community and in a Muslim’s daily life.
  • The importance of Sunnah and Hadith.
Module 4 - Matters of Life & Death

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The origin and value of the universe.
  • The divergent views in Islam about the use of the universe.
  • The Islamic view that human life is holy and how this is shown in the Qur’an.
  • Muslim responses to non-religious explanations about the origin of the universe and the value of human life.
  • The importance of evolution and survival of the fittest for Muslims today.
  • The divergent Muslim views on abortion and non-religious responses to them.
  • The belief in an afterlife and non-religious attitudes to life after death.
  • The impact of the sanctity of life for Muslim attitudes to Euthanasia.
  • The importance of hospice care for Muslims.
  • Non-religious attitudes to the end of life including situational ethics.
  • Muslim and non-religious attitudes to the natural world; pollution, global warming, use of resources, humanity as Khalifah.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain Muslim beliefs about the creation of the world and the sanctity of life?
  • Can I explain non-religious responses to these points of view?
  • Can I explain how Muslim attitudes to the creation of the universe and the sanctity of life affect views on euthanasia and abortion?
  • Can I explain non-religious responses to these points of view?
  • Can I explain how Muslim attitudes to the earth, including as Khalifah?
  • Can I explain non-religious responses to these points of view?
  • Can I explain and contrast how Christians approach the topics of origin, sanctity of life, abortion, euthanasia and dominion/stewardship?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to Paley’s argument and the Big Bang.
  • References to attitudes to contraception and divorce.
  • References to the importance of marriage, the family and the Ummah.
  • Reference to Zakah and Khums.
  • Reference to Sunnah, Hadith and the Qur’an.
  • Reference to Christian teaching.
  • Reference to situational ethics.
Module 5 - Jewish Beliefs: Crime & Punishment

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • The nature of the Almighty and the characteristics shown in the Torah.
  • The importance of the Almighty as creator, law-giver, judge and One for Jews today.
  • The nature and importance of Shekhinah and the divergent understandings in different forms of Orthodox Judaism.
  • The nature of the messiah and the Messianic Age.
  • The covemant’s at Sinai and with Abraham including the importance of the Decalogue and the Promised Land.
  • The nature and importance of Pikuach Nefesh and how it is applied by Jews today.
  • Jewish attitudes towards justice and non-religious responses to these attitudes.
  • Jewish attitudes towards crime and how do Jewish individuals and groups try to end crime.
  • The nature and importance of the Mitzvot; between humans, humans and the Almighty and the concept of free will
  • Jewish beliefs about life after death – including differences between Orthodox and Reform Judaism.
  • The nature of ressurection and judgement and the importance of life after death for Jews today.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain why the nature of the Almighty in Judaism and the characteristics of the Almighty?
  • Can I explain why the Shekinah is important to Jews and the different ways it is understood?
  • Can I explain the relationship between the Almighty and Jews as show through the Covenants?
  • Can I explain why Jews believe life to be sacred and how it affects their lives today?
  • Can I explain how belief in the Almighty affects the lives of Jews on a daily basis?
  • Can I explain the different beliefs that Jews have about life after death, judgement and ressurection?
  • Can I explain Jewish attitudes to justice and crime with reference to Deutoronomy?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • References to the nature of God in Christianity and Islam.
  • Reference to the oneness of God in Islam viz. the Trinity.
  • Reference to Christian belief in Jesus as Messiah and Islamic belief in Muhammad being the Seal of the Prophets.
  • Reference to Christian, Islamic and non-religious views about the Sancity of Life – inc. abortion, euthanasia and life after death.
Module 6 - Crime & Punishment

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Jewish teachings about the nature of good, evil and suffering.
  • Non-Jewish responses to Jewish beliefs and the nature of good, evil and suffering and Jewish responses.
  • Jewish attiudes towards punishment and the nature of punishment.
  • Jewish attitudes towards the aims of punishment and why it might be needed in society.
  • Jewish teachings about forgiveness and the nature of restorative justice.
  • Jewish teachings about. the treatments of criminals including reference to torture, situational ethics and human rights.
  • Jewish attitudes to the death penalty; Non-Jewish attitudes to the death penalty and Jewish responses to them.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Can I explain Jewish and non-Jewish attitudes to the nature of good, evil and suffering with reference to Exodus?
  • Can I explain Jewish and non-Jewish attitudes to punishment with reference to Leviticus?
  • Can I explain Jewish and non-Jewish attitudes to forgiveness with reference to Isiah?
  • Can I explain Jewish and non-Jewish attitudes to the treatment of criminals and the death penalty with reference to Deutoronomy, Exodus and Mishnah Makkot?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Reference to British Law.
  • Reference to suffering, death penalty and treatment of people as taught at KS3.
  • Reference to Christian attitudes to the treatment of prisioners and punishment.
  • Reference to the Almighty as Law-Giver.
  • Reference to Mitzvot, Torah and Tenakh as SoA.