KS4 Fine Art

Module 1 - Natural Forms

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are natural forms?
  • What are the formal elements?
  • What are primary colours?
  • What are secondary colours?
  • What are tertiary colours?
  • What is a narrative?
  • What is expressive?
  • What is mark making?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students must show knowledge and understanding of:

    • how ideas, feelings and meanings can be conveyed and interpreted in images and artefacts in the chosen area(s) of study within Fine art
    • historical and contemporary developments and different styles and genres
    • how images and artefacts relate to social, environmental, cultural and/or ethical contexts, and to the time and place in which they were created
    • continuity and change in different styles, genres and traditions relevant to Fine Art
    • a working vocabulary and specialist terminology that is relevant to their chosen area(s) of Fine Art
    • how to create a fluid body of work based on a specific starting point
    • how to carry out strategic research about other artists work
    • how to analyse/evaluate their own and others’ outcomes using increasingly sophisticated subject specific language
    • how to create personal and meaningful final outcomes suitable for exhibition
    • how to know, understand and apply the Formal Elements in Art
    • how to work independently, managing time and resources appropriately
  • Provide students with opportunities to explore and investigate different ways of working in response to key aspects of the Fine Art title.
  • Students can work in sketchbooks or select a variety of other surfaces on which to record their observations, ideas and insights. They can work in two- and/or three dimensions and a range of sizes and styles using a selection of media, techniques and materials.
  • Students can select and use a variety of traditional and/or experimental recording, mark making and drawing materials. In Component 1 and Component 2 students are required to work in one or more area(s) of fine art, such as those listed below:

    • drawing
    • painting
    • sculpture
    • installation
    • lens-/light-based media
    • photography and the moving image
    • printmaking
    • mixed media
    • land art
  • Intellectual skills;
  • Students will conduct strategic research, using a range of primary and secondary sources (books, galleries, cameras, Internet etc); in order to develop a critical understanding of Fine Art.
  • Students will develop and employ appropriate subject specific vocabulary. They will use this vocabulary to articulate in speech and when writing critically.
  • Students will document their learning journey imaginatively through a personal sketchbook.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Throughout KS3, students developed their understanding of the importance of the formal elements and should be able to confidently drawn upon them when explaining the elements within the artwork of their choosing;
  • Students have a wealth of Art history knowledge, dating from Prehistoric Art to Twentieth Century forms. This can be used to understand the themes of key artists and photographers;
  • All students have been exposed to a variety of traditional and unconventional mediums, which has encouraged them to explore a range of experimentations. This should help them to further develop and build upon their own findings in KS4.
Module 2 - Natural Forms

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What techniques can be explored in acrylic paint?
  • What techniques can be explored in oil pastel?
  • What are your creative intentions and how do you plan to realise them?
  • What is annotation and why is it important for your practice and portfolio?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students must show knowledge of how to apply the following in their own work:

    • how to control and manipulate acrylic paint;
    • how to control and manipulate oil pastel;
    • how techniques and processes can aid in the realisation of intentions;
    • how annotation is useful in the development of an idea;
    • how to create a personal and meaningful response;
    • how to experiment with painting and drawing techniques to realise creative intentions.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Throughout KS3, students developed their understanding of the importance of the formal elements and should be able to confidently drawn upon them when explaining the elements within the artwork of their choosing;
  • Students have a wealth of Art history knowledge, dating from Prehistoric Art to Twentieth Century forms. This can be used to understand the themes of key artists and photographers;
  • All students have been exposed to a variety of traditional and unconventional mediums, which has encouraged them to explore a range of experimentations. This should help them to further develop and build upon their own findings in KS4.
Module 3 - Natural Forms

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is ink and bleach and how can it be manipulated?
  • What is acetote printing and how can it be manipulated?
  • What is emulsion printing and how can it be manipulated?
  • What is critical and contextual understanding and where is this seen in your portfolio?
  • What are your creative intentions and how are you realising them?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students must show knowledge of how to apply the following:

    • how critical and contextual understanding can inform their work;
    • how exploration of materials and processes can aid in the development of an idea;
    • how they can communicate their idea/s using visual language;
    • how to conduct strategic research to further develop and refine their ideas; –
    • how to experiment and refine their personal and meaningful ideas in order to achieve intentions.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Throughout KS3, students developed their understanding of the importance of the formal elements and should be able to confidently drawn upon them when explaining the elements within the artwork of their choosing;
  • Students have a wealth of Art history knowledge, dating from Prehistoric Art to Twentieth Century forms. This can be used to understand the themes of key artists and photographers;
  • All students have been exposed to a variety of traditional and unconventional mediums, which has encouraged them to explore a range of experimentations. This should help them to further develop and build upon their own findings in KS4.
Module 3 - Selection of Further Work (Experimental Portraits)

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is blind drawing?
  • What is tactile drawing?
  • What is upside down drawing?
  • In what ways can you draw collaboratively?
  • What is reverse drawing?
  • What is expressive drawing?
  • What is gestural drawing?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students must be able to demonstrate knowledge of the following skills:

    • how drawing is an experiental and experimental process;
    • how the process of drawing can be as important as the outcome;
    • how and why we take creative risks to realise intentions;
    • how to explore and experiment with materials and processes;
    • how to take creative risks;
    • how to work on a range of surfaces and scales.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students have experienced some experimental drawing at KS3 (Blind & Upisde Down) and in M1 & M2 (the aim here is build on this explicitly and routinely);
  • Students have built up a breadth of tradional practices so far. This mini-course will encourage them to avoid ‘playing it safe’ and take more creative risks in their outcomes.
Module 4 - Human Figure

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What could be explored from the starting point ‘Human Figures’?
  • What is critical and contextual understanding and how is this evidenced in your portfolio?
  • What techniques and processes can you experiment with to explore your idea?
  • What are creative intentions and how do you realise them?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students must be able to demonstrate knowledge of the following skills:

    • the potential interpretations of the theme ‘Human Figure’;
    • how experimentation and exploration can be used to develop a personal and meaningful response;
    • how critical and contextual understanding can help the development of an idea;
    • how creative intentions can be realised through refinement of ideas and processes;
    • how to record artistic observations, ideas and insights.
    • how to work in two- and/or three dimensions and a range of sizes and styles using a selection of media, techniques and materials;
    • how to use a variety of traditional and/or experimental recording, mark making and drawing materials (in Component 1 and Component 2 students are required to work in one or more area(s) of fine art, such as those listed below: drawing, painting, sculpture, installation, lens-/light-based media, photography and the moving image, printmaking, mixed media, land art);
    • how to conduct strategic research, using a range of primary and secondary sources (books, galleries, cameras, Internet etc); in order to develop a critical understanding of Fine Art;
    • how to develop and employ appropriate subject specific vocabulary in both speech and when writing critically;
    • how to document their learning journey imaginatively through a personal sketchbook.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students have been explicitly taught art-making techniques and skills that are both tradtional and experimental. These can be drawn upon to take creative risks and refine their ideas. The primary sources worked with in M3 (portraits) will inform work made in response to the Human Figure.
Modules 5 & 6 - Human Figure

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is critical and contextual understanding and where is this seen in your portfolio?
  • What are your creative intentions and how are you realising them?
  • What are Alternative Compositions?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students must be able to demonstrate knowledge of the following skills:

    • how to conduct strategic research to further develop and refine their ideas; – how to explore, experiment and refine their personal and meaningful ideas in order to resolve intentions;
    • how critical and contextual understanding can inform their work;
    • how exploration of materials and processes can aid in the development of an idea;
    • how they can communicate their idea[s] using visual language.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students have been explicitly taught art-making techniques and skills that are both tradtional and experimental. These can be drawn upon to take creative risks and refine their ideas. The primary sources worked with in M3 (portraits) will inform work made in response to the Human Figure.