KS4 Drama

Module 1 - Performance Skills: Component 1, Section A

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are drama skills?
  • What are stage positions?
  • What are the different types of stages?
  • What are the different roles and responsibilities in the theatre?
  • What makes a successful performance?
  • How do you rehearse effectively?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to list all the physical skills (direction, pace,gait, control, tension, gesture, facial expression, eye contact, posture) and understand what they mean;
  • Be able to list all the vocal skills (pitch, pace, pause, diction, volume, power, emphasis, accent, articulation) and understand what they mean;
  • Be able to identify and describe different types of stages and stage positions’
  • Be able to identify and describe the the roles and responsibilities of theatre makers.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • By the end of Key Stage 3 students will know how to work effectively in groups and develop their collaborative skills. Students will know the expectations of GCSE Drama and should be identify the 5 key skills in producing and evaluating dramatic performance including: Confidence, Communication, Co-operation, Commitment and Concentration. Students will know how to successfully evaluate peer work.
Module 2 - Performance Skills: Component 1, Sections A & C

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are physical skills?
  • What are vocal skills?
  • How is drama and theatre developed and performed?
  • How can an actor use vocal/physical skills to communicate subtle changes to a character’s emotions?
  • How can an actor communicate their character’s emotions to the audience?
  • How do you answer a live review question under exam conditions?
  • How can you learn lines as part of a scripted performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe how actors use physical skills (direction, pace,gait, control, tension, gesture, facial expression, eye contact, posture);
  • Be able to describe how actors use vocal skills (pitch, pace, pause, diction, volume, power, emphasis, accent, articulation);
  • Be able to anaylse and evaluate how actors use physical/vocal skills and how they communicate those skills to an audience;
  • Be able to develop critique and reflection of practical work using drama terminology.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how an actor and other theatre makers can create and perform theatre. Students will start to understand how to write in exam conditions using point, evidence and explain in their answer. This is a process they will be familiar with from prior studies in English.
Module 3 - Introduction to Set Play (Blood Brothers); Introduction to Devising Skills; Component 1, Section B; Component 2

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Willy Russell?
  • What is Blood Brothers about?
  • What is the historical and social context of Blood Brothers?
  • Who are the main characters in Blood Brothers?
  • How do you create a character using voice and movement?
  • What is a stimulus?
  • How do you respond to a stimulus?
  • How do you evaluate your work effectively?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe the of the social, cultural and historical context in which Blood Brothers is set;
  • Be able to begin to understand the timeline of the Blood Brothers play;
  • Be able to begin to understand the key characters and their interactions;
  • Be able to develop, rehearse and perform in an ensemble performance;
  • Be able to work collaboratively to generate, create, rehearse and develop ideas

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • In Year 9 M3, tudents would have been introduced to Willy Russell’s Blood Brothers and would be familiar with the plot, context, form, structure, characters, themes and language used.
  • Throughout KS3 students have been used to creating their own devised pieces in a verity of forms such as physical and naturalistic theatre. They would understand how the strategies, mediums and elements can be
    used to aid the devising process and would have began to keep records of their work and be able to assess themselves against a criteria.
Module 4 - Blood Brothers Continued; Devising Skills Continued; Component 1, Section B; Component 2

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the main themes surrounding Blood Brothers?
  • What techniques does Willy Russell use in his writing of Blood Brothers?
  • What is meant by the terms: form and genre, structure, mood, stage direction, language?
  • How do the roles and responsiblities of theatre makers bring the play to life? and what challenges can theatre makers face?
  • How does the genre of play get conveyed to the audience?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to be introduced to a range of stimuli and select one piece to centre an extended piece of Drama upon.
  • To understand the function of the devising log and explore how to use this to aid with the devising process.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • In KS3 students would have worked on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style. They would have also refleced on acting aims/ intentions as well as have an understanding of audience reaction/ response, mood and atmosphere.
Module 5 - Live Theatre Writing Skills; Devising Skills; Component 1 Revision (A, B & C); Component 2

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you apply knowledge and understanding when making, performing and responding to drama?
  • How can you explore performance texts, understanding their social, cultural and historical context including the theatrical conventions of the period in which they were created?
  • How can you develop an awareness and understanding of the roles and processes undertaken in contemporary professional theatre practice?
  • How can you understand and implement theatre and drama terminology in written work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To analyse and review a live performance so students can develop their understanding of the set play;
  • To be able to identify key moments within the play in terms of moving the plot forwards;
  • To begin to understand and be able to reflect on their own performance using subject-specific terminology;
  • How to learn lines as part of a scripted performance; to develop, rehearse and perform in an ensemble performance.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • In KS3 students would have watched a verity of performances based on physical and natrualistic theatre and answered questioned based on vocal and pyhsical skills that the actors convey to the audience.
Module 6 - Devising Skills; Scripted Performance: Component 3

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How do you apply knowledge and understanding when making, performing and responding to drama?
  • How can you explore performance texts, understanding their social, cultural and historical context including the theatrical conventions of the period in which they were created?
  • How can you develop an awareness and understanding of the roles and processes undertaken in contemporary professional theatre practice?
  • How can you understand and implement theatre and drama terminology in written work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To analyse and review a live performance so students can develop their understanding of the set play;
  • To be able to identify key moments within the play in terms of moving the plot forwards;
  • To begin to understand and be able to reflect on their own performance using subject-specific terminology;
  • How to learn lines as part of a scripted performance; to develop, rehearse and perform in an ensemble performance.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Throughout KS3 students are exposed to a range of scripts and are assessed on their performance quailty and creation of a character. They would be accustomed to assessing themseleves against a criteria.