KS3 Physical Education

Module 1 - Ethical Issues: Fairness in Sport

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Adaptation and choice

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a National Governing Body (NGB)? What are the Rules? What is Sporting Etiquette? What is Sportsmanship? What is Gamesmanship?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to provide various examples of both sportsmanship and gamesmanship within the world of sport; Be able to explain why rules govern a sport of their choosing; Be able to expand on why it is necessary for all athletes and sports people to abide by the rules, demonstrate sporting etiquette, and uphold the values of sportsmanship.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The starting point of our curriculum introduces pupils to the governing bodies that are responsible for sports within the UK.

Additionally, pupils are introduced to two types of behaviour: Sportsmanship and Gamesmanship. Thoughout the module/year, teachers must emphasise the importance of demonstrating sportsmanship, in addition to sporing etiquette, when participating in sport/physical activity.

The emphasis for this module is routine. Teachers to ensure sportsmanship, and the display of respect, is evident in all lessons, referring to why sport is a positive tool when rules are upheld.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 2 - Health & Fitness

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Movement and environment

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the definition of Health and Fitness?
What are the six, skill-related components of fitness and their definitions?
What are the four, health-related components of fitness and their definitions?
What are some examples of the components of fitness within sport?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to categorise, explain and provide examples of the components of fitness within different sporting contexts.

To recognise that not all athletes require the same components of fitness and understand why.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

All aspects of sporting performance require a good level of health and fitness.

Pupils, from the outset, will be clear with the definitions to ensure clarity and understanding moving forwards.

The components of fitness are a sensible place to begin, due to said components being used within every single PE lesson. Pupils need to understand what they are, and why they are important in different contexts.

Moving forwards, this will be extremely beneficial when looking to justify answers and provide feedback to a performer when observing their performance.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and D

Module 3 - Exercise

Key Concept

Relationships

Related Concept(s)

Energy and balance

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

Why is it important to undertake a warm-up before physical activity?

What are the main components (parts) of a warm up and cool down?

What are the benefits of a cool down?

What are the immediate, short, and long-term effects of exercise on the body?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to devise and lead an appropriate warm-up for the physical activity they are undertaking.

Be able to recognise and explain why a warm-up is important and how a cool down can benefit our recovery.

Be able to recognise the effects exercise has on the body within the immediate, short, and long-term.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Module three will include a Fitness/Aerobics unit. WIthout an understanding of the importance to warm up and cool down effectively, pupils may put themselves at risk should they not understand why we need to prepare our bodies for strenuous exercise.

Pupils have a secure knowledge of the components of fitness. This will allow for the safe development of said components within lessons.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 4 - Types of Training

Key Concept

Communities

Related Concept(s)

Perspective and interaction

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is aerobic exercise?

What is anaerobic exercise?

What is continuous training?

What is interval training?

What is circuit training?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to explore different ways in which continuous training can be undertaken.

Be able to recognise the structure of an interval training session.

Be able to devise a circuit training session and identify the components of fitness that they are improving. Pupils will take ownership and ensure clear, concise delivery of exercises.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils have a secure knowledge of the components of fitness, and will now be introduced to exercises that can be used to improve them.

Pupils understand the importance of undertaking a warm-up and cool down and will incorporate this into their training session.

Pupils will use their knowledge of the ‘effects of exercise’ to recognise when, within their session, these effects occur.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 5 - Fitness Testing

Key Concept

Logic

Related Concept(s)

Space

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the word equation for aerobic respiration?

What is the word equation for anaerobic respiration?

What role does lactic acid play in exercise?

What is EPOC and how does exercise ‘trigger’ this?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the correct fitness test in relation to the component of fitness being measured.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils have a solid understanding of the components of fitness and lifestyle factors that may affect sporting performance. This module will allow for pupils to understand how fitness testing can be carried out to ensure weaknesses are identified and targetted when looking to make improvements going forwards.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and B

Module 6 - Diet & Nutrition

Key Concept

Development

Related Concept(s)

Refinement and systems

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the macronutrient and mironutrient food groups?

What proportions of each food group does an individual require?

What does a healthy, balanced lifestyle look like?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to plan a healthy meal that factors in the macro/micronutrient proportions (for themselves).

Be able to understand and explain why certain food groups are more important for a sportsperson.

Be able to plan a meal that is tailored to a sportsperson of their choice.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The obesity epidemic which plagues our country means that a greater education on healthy choices is necessary.

Pupils will be able to understand how sportspeople tailor their diet to support them within the realms of their activity (linked to the components of fitness).

Pupils will be able to transfer this knowledge into real-life situations, where healthy choices are desired and preferred, whilst a recognition that everyone, regardless of career, needs to ensure they find a healthy balance.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 1 - The Principles of Training

Key Concept

Development

Related Concept(s)

Systems and adaptation

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the principles of training? What does SPORT mean, in regard to the principles of training? What does the term FITT stand for?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to create a target for a sportsperson of their choosing; Be able to set a goal that ensures the principles of training have been considered; Be able to use the FITT principle to allow for progression over a period of time.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Moving into year 8, pupils will be expected to identify desired aspects of performance. From this, and through an introduction into the principles of training, pupils will be expected to identify areas of weakness and confidently set a target that considers the principles.

Pupils, with a strong knowledge of warming up and cooling down effectively, will give recognition to the FITT principle to minimise disruption to training caused by injury.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 2 - The Skeletal System

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Movement and interaction

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the six functions of the skeletal system?

What are the major bones within the human body? [Structure]

What are ligaments and tendons?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to recognise the major bones that encompass general sporting movements.

Be able to explain how the functions of our skeletal system allow for participation in physical activities.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils are now in a position to begin analysing sporting performance in greater detail, and therefore the introduction of the skeletal system allows for greater recognition of the human body when observing performance.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and D

Module 3 - The Muscular System

Key Concept

Relationships

Related Concept(s)

Perspective and choice

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the major muscles within the body?

What is an antagonistic muscle pair?

How do muscles work to create movement?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to recognise how movement is initiated by a muscle when it contracts.

Be able to identify the muscles being used to bring about movement within a sporting technique of their choosing.

Be able to recognise the role of red blood cells (from previous unit) to allow for movement to occur.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils are aware of the production of red blood cells within the functions of the skeletal system and are now going to understand their importance with regards to muscle contractions.

When analysing performance, pupils will secure a deeper understanding of how the body moves and sporing action are executed.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 4 - Injury Prevention & Training Optimisation

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Environment and systems

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the common sporting injuries?

How can we treat said injuries?

What are the steps to rehabiliation?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Pupils will be able to identify the common injuries associated with regular physical activity.

Pupils will be able to assess an injury and apply their knowledge of injury treatment.

Pupils will be able to suggest the steps to take when looking to recover from an injury.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The pupils are now in a position to recognise how areas of the skeletal and muscular system can be negatively affected by regular physical activity.

By associating their prior knowledge to new content, pupils will be in good stead to recognise the stages of rehabilitation.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 5 - The Cardiovascular System

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Space and function

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the general structure of our cardiovascular system?

What effect does exercise have on the cardiovscular system?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Pupils will be able to identify the major components of the cardiovascular system.

Pupils will understand how the cardiovascular system works to transfer essential nutrients around our body.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

With a solid foundation of the knowledge surrounding warming up/cooling down effectively, pupils will now learn how our cardiovascular system delivers oxygen around our body, via a network of veins, and brings the deoxygenated blood back to the heart, via arteries.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and B

Module 6 - The Respiratory System

Key Concept

Development

Related Concept(s)

Adaptation and refinement

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the general structure of the respiratory system?

Explain the act of breathing.

What is tidal volume?

What is gaseous exchange?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Pupils will be able to identify the major components of the respiratory system.

Pupils will understand the pivotal role the respiratory system has on delivering the nutrients our body requires.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

With the above focusing on delivery of nutrients within the body, pupils will now understand the vital role our respiratory system plays in delivering nutrients to the body.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 1 - Classifications of Skills

Key Concept

Development

Related Concept(s)

Systems and adaptation

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a skill? What is an ability? How can a skill be classified to better understand it? What factors need to be considered when classifying a skill? What are the four main skill classifications?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Pupils should be able to observe and anaylse sporting examples, recognising techniques that have been learned/mastered over a period of time.

Pupils will be able to classify the skills they observe into one of the four main categories, justifying their choice by considering the factors learned prior.

Pupils will appreciate the limitations of one’s ability when considering further developments to their performance.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils have a sound understanding of performance analysis and therefore the introduction of skill classifcation is the reocgnisiton that sports performance must consider the ‘whole’ (that of: skill, environment, and information processing) when refinement is desired.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 2 - Basic Information Processing

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Movement and interaction

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is guidance and feedback?

How can we use guidance and feedback to improve performance?

What is the most effective type of guidance and feedback for a sport of your choice?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Pupils will be able to clearly disitnguish between guidance and feedback.

Pupils will be able to provide guidance to another pupil within the unit of study.

Pupils will be able to provide both intrinsic (to themselves), and extrinsic feedback to another pupil within their class.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Goal setting will play a more prominent role this year, within lessons, and pupils will be confident in providing feedback and guidance to one another.

The content within module one will encourage different skills to be recognised and broken down (if applicable).

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and D

Module 3 - Mental Preparation

Key Concept

Relationships

Related Concept(s)

Perspective and choice

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is arousal?

How can you control your arousal levels?

What are the key characteristics of an introvert and an extrovert?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

In a pressurised situation, pupils will be able to apply arousal techniques to ensure optimal levels are achieved.

Pupils will be able to recognise mental techniques from sporting examples.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils will be able to act on the feedback they receive and use arousal techniques to ensure improvements can be made.

Their sound knowledge of basic/complex skills will allow them to identify, and develop skills within their performance.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 4 - Socio-Cultural Issues

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Environment and systems

ATLs

Thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What effects participation in physical activity?

What barriers are there to participation?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do>?

Pupils will be able to understand why initiatives are used to increase participation in different communities.

Pupils will recognise the challenges certain groups face when wanting to partake in physical activity/sport.

Pupils will be able to suggest ways in which barriers can be overcome when wanting to increase participation.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

With a healthy, active lifestyle at the forefront of each and every lesson, pupils know the importance (physically, mentally, and socially) of regular participation in physical activity, and therefore by understanding the barriers that some face, will encourage a greater awareness/exposure to the challenges that need to be tackled.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 5 - Commercialisation in Sport

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Space and function

ATLs

Research and thinking

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

The commercialisation of sport can create opportunities and barriers to participation.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

What is commercialisation?

How does sponsorship/the media affect participation?

How has technology evolved within the sporting world?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils will understand the ‘Golden Triangle’ and how this affects participation.

Pupils will be able to identify media sources that promote/inhibit participation in physical activity/sport.

Pupils will be able to conclude as to whether technology has made a positive or negative impact on a sport of their choice.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

With participation (and barriers to) introduced during the previous module, pupils will now be able to recognise the external influences that come from media sources..

Pupils understand why physical activity is important and now they will be exposed to the influence sponsors, media outlets, and technology have on participation.

Module 6 - Ethical Issues

Key Concept

Development

Related Concept(s)

Adaptation and refinement

ATLs

Social and self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

The behaviour of those within the realm of sport must support fairness.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

How does player conduct affect the image a sport has?

What are prohibited substances within sport?

How can spectator behaviour affect the image a sport has?

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils will be able to identify a variety of proibited substances and understand the advantage they would give the performer.

Pupils will be able to recognise positive/negative behaviours that are associated with spectators.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Pupils know what sportsmanship and gamesmanship is. It is important for pupils to realise the ‘options’ an athlete has when looking to gain an unfair advantage within their sport.