KS3 Music

Modules 1, 2 & 3 - Music as another language: Telling stories in the Western Classical tradition

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Audience and interpretation

ATLs

Social skills
Collaboration – students will work in groups to produce pieces of music. They will need to compromise to make decisions and be an active participant in discussion and in practise. Students to be taught how to take turns and how to present ideas to peers

Self-management skills
Organisation – students will be working independently, within their groups, to produce a piece of music. They will need to organise their time well to include discussion, individual practice and group practice. Students will be taught how to plan out time in a rehearsal setting and how to manage resources effectively.

Communication skills
Language – students will be expected to use correct terminology to communicate clearly to avoid confusion and impeding progress. Students will be taught how to proofread work and correct language.

Research
Media Literacy – students will use DAWs to create ideas and find information.

Thinking
Transfer – Students will need to use their keyboard skills on a computer to create multi-track composition.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the elements of music?
How to use key terminology related to the elements of
music when describing a piece
What are the families of instruments in the orchestra?
What is a semi breve, a minim, a crotchet, a quaver?
What is a time signature?
What is a chord?
What is notation?
What is the musical alphabet?
What is a scale?
What are the notes on tuned percussion?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to list all eight elements of music;
Be able to identify the use of the elements of music in a piece of 17th century classical music
Be able to Sightread with moderate accuracy
Be able to explain the importance of the elements in music when composing for a narrative
Be able to create a compositional plan in the effort to create a piece
Be able to list note values
Students will acquire these musical skills:
How to perform a melody on the piano or tuned percussion on the right hand
How to read a melody line on notation
How to create a short piece that uses the musical elements and reflects a personal narrative

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students start their musical journey at what constitute the basis of music, the elements of music. (A)
They learn how music can be listened and critically assessed using this knowledge, namely music
from the western musical tradition (17th. century)(D). Pupils will then learn that there is categorisation
amongst insntruments, the families of instruments within the orchestra (A)
From this starting point, they are introduced to the performance of musical elements as found in Beethoven’s
Ode to Joy (19th) (B)and its use of Major harmony and repeated leitmotif.(A)
Having the knowledge of the elements of music as well as their use, students establish a Creative log as
to prepare a plan of action to create their #Loveyourself piece.(C)
This plan as well as the students’ prior knowledge of musical elements and their use in performance on
piano and tuned percussions will give them the tools necessary to create and perform their piece at
the end of the unit. (B/C)

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A – Inquiring and Analysing

B – Developing Ideas

C – Creating the Solution

Modules 4, 5 & 6 - How innovation creates change: The story of the Pentatonic Scale

Key Concept

Orientation in space and time

Related Concept(s)

Genre and innovation

ATLs

Social skills
Collaboration – students will work in groups to produce pieces of music. They will need to compromise to make decisions and be an active participant in discussion and in practise. Students to be taught how to take turns and how to present ideas to peers

Self-management skills
Organisation – students will be working independently, within their groups, to produce a piece of music. They will need to organise their time well to include discussion, individual practice and group practice. Students will be taught how to plan out time in a rehearsal setting and how to manage resources effectively.

Communication skills
Language – students will be expected to use correct terminology to communicate clearly to avoid confusion and impeding progress. Students will be taught how to proofread work and correct language.

Research
Media Literacy – students will use DAWs to create ideas and find information.

Thinking
Transfer – Students will need to use their keyboard skills on a computer to create multi-track composition.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the pentatonic scale?
What is the C Major scale?
What are enharmonics?
What is a drone?
What is an ostinato?
What is improvisation?
What is a graphic score?
What are the instruments of Chinese music?
What are the notes on the piano?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to define a scale;
Be able to define the pentatonic scale
Be able to recognise the use of the pentatonic scale in Chinese music and Western classical music of
the 20th century.
Be able to create a rehearsal plan in the effort to arrange a piece

Students will acquire these musical skills:
How to perform a short piano piece with both hands with some accuracy
How to improvise using the pentatonic scale
How to arrange for an ensemble piece using prior knowledge of musical elements and the pentatonic
scale
How to perform as an ensemble

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the musical elements in their prior music module which will enable
them to understand how they are used in chinese music and Western classical music from the 20th century.
(D)Their prior understanding of note values (A) will be used in the arrangement and performance of a piece at the end of the module.(B, C). Having been studying the families of orchestra, students will be invited to reflect on the technical innovations of chinese instruments and how they have influenced its genre.(A)

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A – Inquiring and Analysing

B – Developing Ideas

D – Evaluating

Modules 1, 2 & 3 - How Music creates culture: The story of the Afro-American Identity

Key Concept

Aesthetics

Related Concept(s)

Structure and expression

ATLs

Social skills
Collaboration – students will work in groups to produce pieces of music. They will need to compromise to make decisions and be an active participant in discussion and in practise. Students to be taught how to take turns and how to present ideas to peers

Self-management skills
Organisation – students will be working independently, within their groups, to rehearse a piece of music. They will need to organise their time well to include discussion, individual practice and group practice. Students will be taught how to plan out time in a rehearsal setting and how to manage resources effectively.

Communication skills
Language – students will be expected to use correct terminology to communicate clearly to avoid confusion and impeding progress. Students will be taught how to proofread work and correct language.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the Blues scale?
What is the 12 Bar Blues?
What is improvisation in Jazz?
What is an arrangement?
What is syncopation?
What are the instruments of the Blues, Jazz and R’n’B?
Where is the Blues from?
What is a chord sequence?
What is a bassline?
What is in a Maj7 chord a min7 chord?
What is a triad?
What is a leadsheet?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to describe accurately a chord sequence and the 12
Bar Blues
Be able to perform the 12 Bar Blues on tuned percussion
Be able to recognise the use of the Blues Scale
Be able to play the Blues scale on tuned percussion
Be able to identify instrumentation used in the Blues and Jazz
Be able to create an arrangement of a given piece
Be able to perform in an ensemble

Students will acquire these musical skills:
How to perform a short piano piece with both hands with moderate accuracy
How to improvise using the blues scale
How to arrange for an ensemble piece using prior knowledge of the Blues and Jazz
How to perform as an ensemble

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the elements of music and their use in Classical music from the 17th and
20th century as well as Chinese music and would therefore have awareness of early structures and
organisation in music, and how they can evolve in 20th century America.They will be able to establish links
between instruments of the orchestra and of the Blues, Jazz permitting a reflection on innovation within
genre.Having knowledge of the pentatonic scale and enharmonics, students will be able to link its usage in
composition with the use of the Blues scale in Blues, Jazz and R’n’B.Having an understanding of improvisation
and its compositional impact in Chinese music, students will be able to draw uponthis knowledge when creating
their improvisation of scales in Blues and Jazz.
The students’ ability to read pitch, rhythm on tuned percussion will give them the tools
needed as to read and create music as to how to critically assess their and their peers’
work using correct terminology. Having been previously askeed to create a version of an existing piece,
students would have prior knowledge of what an arrangement is as to develop skills related to how to arrange.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A,B,C,D

Modules 4, 5 & 6 - Music as another language: How Music can be used to tell cinematic stories

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Composition and narrative

ATLs

Thinking skills: Map the creative thought process in the arts process journal to generate new ideas and questions.
Research skills:Create mood boards, sketches and/or storyboards, which translate an idea

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a leitmotifs?
What is Dissonant harmony?
What is mickey-mousing?
What is diegesis?
What is a DAW?
What is a cue sheet?
What is Foley?
What are sounds effects?
What is an augmented chord?
What is a diminished chord?
How did film composers of the 20th century use the
elements of music to create immersion in film?
How to use a DAW to create a piece of music
What is a contrasting section?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to compose to a brief
Be able to create a contrasting section
Be able to recognise diegesis and its use in film
Be able to create a leitmotif using scales
Be able to create dissonant harmony that fits to a scene using chord progressions
Be able to recogne dissonance in a piece of music and accurately describe it using
the appropriate terminology
Be able to create and use sound effects for a given scene to fit a narrative
Be able to reflect on the effect of music on narrative.

Students will acquire these musical skills:
How to create a short piece with a contrasting section
How to use harmony wiith relevance to a given narrative/scene
How to use a DAW to create, record , edit a piece of music
How to create a melody

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have been reflecting on harmony in Western classical music (17-20th) in Year 7 which will
allow them to reflect on the use of romantic music and influences within film composition. They will be able
to use their knowledge of chord sequences/progressions as they were used in the blues and Jazz as to create
their own. Having developped skills related to arrangements, students will be able to think of the use of
instrumentation in their composition.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A,B,C,D

Modules 1, 2 & 3 - How Music creates culture: The story of Reggae Dub Music

Key Concept

Relationships

Related Concept(s)

Role and boundaries

ATLs

Social skills: Work collaboratively in a production team with assigned roles and responsibilities.
Communication skills: Listen actively and endorse the views or opinions of others.
Self-management skills: Plan the rehearsal schedule for a performance or plan the time needed to create an exhibition.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is an ostinato?
What is a polyrhythm?
What is syncopation?
What is a cyclic rhythm?
What are the instruments of West Africa?
What are the instruments used in the Caribbeans, in Reggae?
What is offbeat?
What is rastafarianism? pan-africanism?
What is a bassline?
What is the Notthing Hill Carnival?
What is the influence of west african drumming on music from
the Caribbeans?
How did Bass culture permitted social interactions and helped
communities in the UK?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to describe accurately the influence of west african music on carribbean music and Uk
music
Be able to perform a syncopated bassline on piano or tuned percussion
Be able to perform a polyrhythm
Be able to create a polyrhythm
Be able to perform offbeat chords
Be able to create a piece with a verse and chorus that uses influences from west african music,
carribbean music and Reggae
Be able to create a bassline using harmony, scales and rhythm
Be able to prepare a rehearsal plan with points of action

Students will acquire these musical skills:
How to create a polyrhythm
How to read and compose rhythm using notation
How to play a one drop rhythm on percussions
How to play the piano with added syncopation

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have had an overview of music and musical techniques used in
Western classical Music from the 17th to the 20th century in Year 7 as well as
some prior knowledge in Y8 of the development of popular music in rythmical notation
and critical listening skills when reflecting on the use of rythm in selected extracts of music.
Having also studied the Blues and Jazz from the 19th until 20th century, students will be able
to understand how popular music has evolved differently in the carribbeans and the UK with west african
influences.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A,B,C,D

Modules 4, 5 & 6 - How innovation creates change: The story of Dance Music

Key Concept

Culture

Related Concept(s)

Genre and innovation

ATLs

Social skills: Work collaboratively in a production team with assigned roles and responsibilities.
Communication skills: Listen actively and endorse the views or opinions of others.
Self-management skills: Plan the rehearsal schedule for a performance or plan the time needed to create an exhibition.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a synthesizer?
What is a drum machine?
What is delay?
What is reverb?
What is distortion?
What is a drop?
What is a build up?
What is a breakdown?
What is a sequencer?
What is EDM?
What is a 4/4 Kick?
What are the defining traits of House music?
What are the defining traits of Techno music?
How did technology advancements influenced the
development of dance music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to structure a piece of dance music
Be able to create and define a 4/4 Kick
Be able to create a dance/house drum pattern with offbeat hats
Be able to identify and define different types and styles of dance music using the relevant terminology
Be able to create and identify a drop
Be able to create and identify a build up
Be able to create and identify a breakdown
Be abe to recognise the use of BPM in different genres (E.g 140bpm in techno)

Students will acquire these musical skills:
How to use a DAW to create a piece of dance music
How to use effects in a DAW
How to sequence a drum pattern

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned to recognise the impact of the pentatonic scale on western classical music and chinese music in Y7, giving them a conceptual understanding of how innovation influenced genres of music.
They would also have been introduced in Y8 and in the previous module to structures and instrumentation in popular music and how it can define musical styles comparing this knowledge to the structure and
instrumentation in Dance music and how it differs from the use of acoustic instruments and Pop structures. This will push the students to reflect on the exponential evolution of musical technology and how it furthered innovation in dance music. Students would have been introduced to using a DAW in Y8 in Film Music and will be able to expand their knowledge to create apiece of dance music, allowing them to reflect on the defining use of specific technology in dance music.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A,B,C,D