KS3 History

Module 1 - Unit 1: Egypt & Greece

Key Concept

Global Interactions

Related Concept(s)

Culture

ATLs

Research skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What is an inference?
– What is chronology?
– What is the difference between AD, BC, CE and BCE?
– What makes a source reliable?
– What is the difference between primary and secondary sources?
– Why was the Nile so important to Egypt?
– Why did Egyptian art look ‘wrong’?
– How did rulers represent themselves?
– What happened during the process of mummification?
– How do people remember Ramesses II?
– Were there any obvious similarities between Egyptian and Greek religious practise?
– What were the characteristics of key Greek gods?
– What were the events of, and purpose of, Greek sacrifice?
– What were the characteristics of Greek heroes?
– What were the two halves of Odysseus’ character?
– What was the nature of Greek theatre and how important was competition?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to make an inference.
– Be able to arrange events and dates from the Classical World in chronological order.
– Be able to begin to investigate and evaluate the reliability of sources.
– Be able to describe events and give one supporting detail.
– Be able to indentify similarities and differences in sources following investigation.
– Be able to begin to form a justified judgement.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 2 - Unit 2: Rome

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Civilisation

ATLs

Communication skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– How did the Romans believe the city of Rome was founded?
– Who was Rhea Silvia?
– Who were Romulus and Remus?
– How large was the Roman Empire?
– When did Britain become part of the Roman Empire?
– What was life like at Hadrian’s Wall?
– What were the different types of Gladiators?
– Where was the amphitheatre in London and what happened there?
– How important was Bathing to Roman Society?
– What was Roman Colchester like?
– How did the Romans worship?
– How did the Romans change Britain?
– Why did the Roman empire collapse?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Write a narrative account about the Foundation of Rome
– Infer from classical sources about life in the north of the Province of Britainnia, including supporting detail.
– Be able to write an explanation essay and begin to give a clear judgement about how far we can understand what life was llke in a Roman town
– Clearly identify two key features of Roman relgious worship and give supporting details.
– Be able to begin to make a judgement on how far the Romans changed Britain.
– Write a narrative account about the collapse of the Roman empire.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Egyptian and Greek beliefs about religion.
– Mythology in Greek culture – Odysseus and the Greek hero
– How the Greeks entertained themselves (theatre vs. gladiators).

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 3 - Unit 3: Islam in the Middle East

Key Concept

Global Interactions

Related Concept(s)

Conflict

ATLs

Thinking skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– Who was Muhammed?
– How did Islam initially spread?
– Why was Bahdad such an important cultural site?
– How did Muslim artists celebrate their faith?
– Why are there restrictions on Muslim art?
– Why was Jersualem such an important city for Muslims, Jews and Christians?
– Who was Pope Urban and why did he launch the Crusades?
– Why did people go on Crusade?
– What was the impact of the Crusades on Europe?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Identify key features in the life of Muhammed and the spread of Islam.
– Identify differences between Egyptian and Islamic Art.
– Analyse sources from Pope Urban using one element of PANDA.
– Write a judgement essay about the reasons why people went on Crusade.
– Write an explanation essay about the impact of the Crusades on Europe.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– The difference between poly and monotheistic religions.
– How did cultural beliefs affect Egyptian art?
– The importance of Rome in the empire.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 4 - Unit 4: Medieval Africa

Key Concept

Global Interactions

Related Concept(s)

Civilisation

ATLs

Research skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– Where is Africa?
– What was the Scramble for Africa?
– How did European historians view Africa?
– Who was King Tenkamenin of Ghana?
– What was Great Zimbabwe like?
– How did the Administration of Mali funtion?
– How important were the royals of Benin?
– What was unique about the religion in Ethiopia?
– How civilised was pre-colonial Africa?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Identify the location of Africa.
– Critically analyse the opinions of European historians using one element of PANDA.
– Write an essay that gives a judgement about the level of civilisation in Africa.
– Use primary sources to analyse the countries of Ghana, Zimbabwe, Mali, Benin and Ethiopia.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Comparison with the adminstrative capabilities of Rome.
– Comparison with Egyptian Royalty – Cleopatra and Ramesses II.
– Comparison with the religions of Greece, Egypt, Rome and Islam.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D

Module 5 - Unit 5: Medieval England I

Key Concept

TBC

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What was England like in 1066?
– Who was in line to succeed Edward the Confessor?
– Who won the Battle of Fulford Bridge?
– How did William win the Battle of Hastings?
– What problems faced William when he became king and how did he solve them?
– What was it like to live in a village?
– What was Medieval England like for women?
– How were Jewish people treated in Medieval England?
– What was it like to live in a town?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Begin to analyse interpretations of history concerning the succession to Edward’s throne.
– Analyse different factors and form a judgement about why William won the Battle of Hastings.
– Use sources to determine what life was like for women and Jewish people in Medieval England.
– Identify key features of town and village life.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Comparison with King Tenkamenin of Ghana, Cleopatra and Ramesses.
– Comparison with Greek theatres, Roman baths: how civilsed was Engand?
– Compaison of the way Jewish people were treated with the way the Christians treated Muslims in the Middle East.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 6 - Unit 6: Medieval England II

Key Concept

TBC

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What did Henry II mean when he asked to be rid of ‘this turbulent priest’?
– How did the Black Death kill people?
– What cures did people try?
– Why did the Peasants revolt against their king?
– What was the Renaissance?
– Why did Martin Luther protest?
– Why did Henry VIII have so many problems?
– Why did Henry VIII Break from Rome?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Identify key features and give supporting details in the death of Thomas Becket.
– Write an explanation essay about the impact of the Black Death.
– Analyse sources to determine the causes of the Peasant’s Revolt.
– Write a judgement essay about the most important reason that Henry broke from Rome.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D

Module 1 - Unit 1: Reformation & Elizabeth I

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Causality

ATLs

Communication skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What changes did Edward make to the English church and why?
– What were the plans for his succession.
– What did Mary do to the church as queen and how did she deal with English Protestants?
– Why was Mary’s marriage to Philip so unpopular?
– How is Mary remembered?
– What problems did Elizabeth face in her childhood?
– What was Elizabeth’s relationship with her siblings like?
– What was Elizabeth’s religious settlement?
– What objections did the Puritans and Catholics have to the settlement?
– Why did Elizabeth execute Mary Queen of Scots?
– What were the causes of the Spanish Armada and the reasons for its failure?
– What factors that drove early exploration and what were the attitudes of the explorers?
– How did Elizabeth portray herself in art?
– Why was James VI / I able to become king of England?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to investigate and analyse sources.
– Be able to infer from sources.
– Be able to describe and give one precise piece of supporting detail.
– Be able to read texts for key pieces of infomation.
– Be able to write a narrative account.
– Be able to begin using PANDA to investigate sources.
– Be able to write an explanation essay with three paragraphs, each containing a precise detail.
– Be able to write with clarity and organise ideas clearly.
– Be able to begin assessing interpretations.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– The religion in England before Henry VIII.
– Henry’s Divorce from Katherine of Aragaon.
– Henry’s marriage to Anne Boleyn and conversion to Protestantism.
– Henry’s role as Head of the Church in England.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 2 - Unit 2: The Stuarts

Key Concept

Systems

Related Concept(s)

Governance

ATLs

Self-management skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– Why did Charles I fall out with Parliament?
– What was the Divine Right of Kings?
– How did Parliament reform the army during the Civil War?
– Who was Oliver Cromwell and what was the New Model Army?
– How far did Prince Rupert help the royalist cause?
– What was Charles accused of and what happened to him?
– Why do people accuse Cromwell of being a war criminal?
– Is Cromwell appropriately remembered in Britain?
– What was Restoration England like?
– Was Charles II a Merry Monarch?
– What was it like to live through the Great Plague and how effective were the actions of the government?
– What was the impact of the Great Fire of London?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to form a coherent judgement on the reasons why Parliament and Charles fell out.
– Be able to compare the benefits of autocracy with the benefits of parliamentary rule.
– Be able to identify the change and consequence of Paliament’s military reforms.
– Be able to use source analysis to form a judgement on the role of Rupert.
– Be able to weigh up the evidence about Cromwell to form a judgement.
– Be able to analyse pictoral sources to form a judgement about Restoration England and Charles II
– Use PANDA to form a judgement on the impact of the Plague on London
– Write a clear narrative account of the Great Fire of London.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Explicit links to the nature of Puritanism and the lingering Catholicism in England.
– The impact of autocracy on the country – see. Henry VIII and the Break with Rome.
– How was Bloody Mary remembered? Is that fair?
– Use of PANDA in the success of Mary lesson.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 3 - Unit 3: Slavery

Key Concept

Global Interactions

Related Concept(s)

Governance

ATLs

Social skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– Why dd Britain have colonies in America?
– Which countries was Britain in competition with?
– How were tobacco and cotton grown and why were they suited to slave labour?
– How were people enslaved?
– What happened during the Middle Passage?
– What was a slave worth and how were they sold?
– How did slaves adapt?
– What were the punishments for resisting the planters?
– How did Britain profit from the Slave Trade?
– What happened in Haiti, Hispaniola, Brazil and the Congo?
– How did American Indepndence affect the campaign for abolition?
– What is the case for paying reparations?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to state key features of slavery.
– Be able to write a narrative account about how the Atlantic Slave Trade began.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of written sources about the Middle Passage using PANDA.
– Be able to write an essay that explains the Trade Triangle.
– Be able to make inferences about conditions on Slave Ships from visual and written sources.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of sources about life on Plantations.
– Be able to make a judgement about who benefitted the most from the Slave Trade.
– Understand the global nature of the slave trade by looking at examples in other countries.
– Be able to write a narrative account of how slavery was abolished.
– Be able to explain the arguments made for paying reparations.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Links to the slavery of Ancient Rome.
– Links to the importance of crops in Egypt and Medieval England.
– Links to English competition with France and Spain, especially as a Protestant country.
– Link to the statue of Cromwell at Parliament.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D

Module 4 - Unit 4: The Industrial Revolution

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Innovation and revolution

ATLs

Thinking skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– How did the landscape of Britain change 1750 -1900?
– What was it like to work in a mill?
– Why did the population of Britain increase during the Industrial Revolution?
– How did the Industrial Revolution affect industry, agriculture, iron and coal production?
– What improvements did the growth of the Railways network bring?
– What can Charles Booth’s map tell us about what life was like for the urban poor?
– Why is there such confusion over the identity of Jack the Ripper and why are the murders so famous?
– What was it like to work in a mine?
– How successful an engineer and businessman was Brunel?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to explain the consequences of Industrial Revolution on the British landscape.
– Be able to state key features of working in a mill.
– Be able to make an inference from a written source about the concerns of the mill owners.
– Be able to explain why the population of Britain grew during the Industrial Revolution.
– Be able to write a narrative account of how the railways created jobs.
– Be able to make inferences about the level of poverty in London from Booth’s map.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of Booth’s map using PANDA.
– Be able to form a judgement about the likley identity of Jack the Ripper.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of sources that discuss the conditions faced by miners using PANDA.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Life in Medieval Towns and Villages.
– The spread of the plague in medieval towns.
– The impact of the Renaissance on education.
– How successful was Charles I as king?

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D

Module 5 - Unit 5: World War One I

Key Concept

TBC

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What was the Scramble for Africa and why did it happen?
– Why was Franz Ferdinand assassinated?
– What were the MAIN causes of World War One?
– Why did Britain go to war to defend Belgium?
– What were the French and German battle plans?
– How did the war become one of attrition?
– How did Britain try to recruit men into the army?
– Why was conscription introduced?
– What was the imapact of the tank, the plane, the submarine and the creeping barrage?
– How were wounded men dealt with?
– What advances did Gillies make?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to make an inference about the importance of Africa to the European powers.
– Be able to identify two key features of Franz Ferdinand’s assassination.
– Be able to write an essay that explains the MAIN causes of WWI.
– Be able to wite a narrative account of Britain’s declaration of war in 1914.
– Be able to identify the key features of Plan 17 and the Schlieffen Plan.
– Be able to make inferences about what life was like in the trenches.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of recruitment posters.
– Be able to identify the key features of each technological advance.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of Gillies’ photographs.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– European attitudes to West African cilivisation.
– European attitudes to Africans and slavery.
– Attitudes of royalty and imperialism (Henry VIII, Charles I).
– Impact of technological advances in war (New Model Army, Ironsides).

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D

Module 6 - Unit 6: World War One II

Key Concept

TBC

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– European attitudes to West African cilivisation.
– European attitudes to Africans and slavery.
– Attitudes of royalty and imperialism (Henry VIII, Charles I).
– Impact of technological advances in war (New Model Army, Ironsides).

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to write a narrative account of the events of 1917.
– Be able to identfy the key features of heroic actions in World War One.
– Be able to plan how to find more information about heroic actions.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of a source for understanding the impact of the U-Boat blockade on Britain.
– Be able to identify the key features of the Suffragettes and the Suffragists.
– Be able to plan how to find more information about the role of women in World War One.
– Be able to write a narrative account about the impact of World War One on the suffrage campaign.
– Be able to write an essay explaining the main terms of the Treaty of Versailles.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– The role of Prince Rupert in the Civil War.
– Comparison of Cromwell’s destruction of Irish crops and the U-boat blockade.
– Life as a Roman and Medieval woman.
– Elizabeth’s descision not to marry.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 1 - Unit 1: The Holocaust I

Key Concept

Global Interactions

Related Concept(s)

Conflict

ATLs

Social skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What was the impact of World War One on Germany and France especially?
– Why did the French want revenge on Germany?
– What was the reaction of the German people to the peace terms?
– What was the effect of the simple messaging and anti-Semitism of the NSDAP?
– Who were the the perpetrators of the Holocaust?
– What is the history of Christian anti-Semitism?
– Why were Jewish people used as scapegoats?
– How did life for Jewish people became progressively worse under Hitler’s government before World War Two?
– Why could many Jewish people simply not leave Germany?
– What happened to disabled people under the NSDAP regime?
– How did people deal with the terrible moral dilemmas when confronting the reality of anti-Semitism?
– Why did the Germans construct Ghettoes in Poland?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to investigate and infer from sources.
– Be able to write a clear explain essay with three paragraphs, each containing a precise detail and that links directly to the question.
– Be able to work with multiple sources to build up an accurate picture of the past.
– Be able to write a narrative account that is in chronological order and explains how events in history are linked.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Primary and Secondary sourcework.
– The attitudes of one group of people to another.
– The religious disputes between Protestants and Catholics.
– The basic tenets of Judaism as taught in RE.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 2 - Unit 2: The Holocaust II

Key Concept

Global Interactions

Related Concept(s)

Conflict

ATLs

Research skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What restrictive measures did Jewish people suffer under NSDAP rule?
– What options were available for Jewish people to resist and how successful was this resistance?
– What was the Wannsee Conference and what decisions were made there?
– What happened to Jewish people at Auschwitz?
– Who was responsible for Holocaust?
– How far can other parties be blamed for the Holocaust (occupied countries, the Allies, inability of Jewish people to emigrate)?
– How is the Holocaust remembered?
– What can personal accounts tell us about the Holocaust?
– Why and how was the state of Israel founded?
– What was the impact of NSDAP violence on Homosexuals and Gypsies during the Holocaust?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to understand why Holocaust historiography changes.
– Be able to understand where they could find more information about the Holocaust
– Be able to make a judgement about how successfully Jewish people resisted.
– Be able to make an inference about the purpose of the Final Solution.
– Be able to understand where they could find more information about Auschwitz.
– Be able to consider multiple points of view and come to a judgement about who is most responsible for the Holocaust.
– Be able to use PANDA to form a judgement about the usefulness of If This is a Man.
– Be able to write a narrative account about the foundation of Israel.
– Be able to make an inference about NSDAP attitudes to Gypsies.
– Be able to understand where they could find more information about the persecution of Homosexuals.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– The Nuremberg Laws and events of Kristallnacht
– The role of the SS in NSDAP society.
– NSDAP views on Untermenschen, the example of the treatement of disabled people, belief in the Aryan race.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 3 - Unit 3: Civil Rights in America I

Key Concept

Systems

Related Concept(s)

Innovation and revolution

ATLs

Communication skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– Why were slaves important to the American economy after independence?
– Was the Civil War fought to free the slaves?
– How were African Americans treated after the Civil War?
– What was Reconstruction?
– What did the members of the KKK want?
– What was the significance of Plessy vs. Ferguson and what was life like under Jim Crow?
– How successful was the NAACP’s campaign of Peaceful Protest?
– What impact did Martin Luther King have with Direct Action?
– How significant was Brown vs. Board of Education and how commited was Eisenhower to desegregation?
– Who was Emmett Till and how did he die?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to write a narrative account of the United States’ history from Independence to c.1850.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of sources that discuss the abolition of slavery in the UK.
– Be able to write an essay explaining the Civil War started.
– Be able state key features about the Civil War, KKK and Reconstruction.
– Be able to make inferences from pictorial sources about the impact of Jim Crow.
– Be able to write a narrative account of the work of the NAACP and peaceful protest.
– Be able to write a judgement question assessing the efficacy of MLK’s direct action.
– Be able to understand how they could find more information out about Eisenhower’s attitude to desegregation.
– Be able to make inferences about the death of Emmett Till.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Slavery in the British Empire.
– Dehumanisation and discrimination against the Jewish people in Germany.
– The causes of the English Civil War.
– Britain’s World War One recruitment campaign.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 4 - Unit 4: Civil Rights in America II

Key Concept

Systems

Related Concept(s)

Innovation and revolution

ATLs

Research skills

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What were the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Act designed to acheive?
– How did the police treat African Americans?
– Why was lynching tolerated?
– Were African Americans more likely to be incacerated than their white peers?
– How successful have the responses to the death of Eric Garner and George Floyd been?
– Does the election of Trump and then Biden support MLK’s ‘the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice’?
– Who migrated to Britain after World War Two?
– Who were the passengers of the Empire Windrush and what were they looking for?
– What was the impact of the Empire Windrush on Britain?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to make inferences about the reasons for the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Act.
– Be able to state the differences between two interpretations looking at police treatment of African Americans.
– Be able to make a judgement about the success of the BLM movement.
– Be able to state key features about the presidecies of Obama and Trump.
– Be able to make inferences about why people migrated to Britain after World War Two.
– Be able to write an essay explaining the impact of the Empire Windrush on Britain.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Comparison with the NSDAP police state.
– Migration of Romans and Normans to Britain.
– Slavery and race relations within the British Empire.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D

Module 5 - Unit 5: End of Empire

Key Concept

TBC

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– Why did the English conquer Ireland?
– What did the British do to relieve the Irish Famine?
– Why did the Irish rebel over British rule in 1916?
– Why was the island of Ireland split in 1921?
– What were both sides attempting to acheive during the Troubles?
– Was Bloody Sunday (1972) a war crime?
– Was the IRA right to commit the Brighton Hotel bombing (1984)?
– Why was India the Jewel in the Crown?
– What contributions did Indians make to the British war effort in World War Two?
– Why did so many people die during Partition?
– Why did India help East Pakistan seced?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to write a narrative account of the English involement in Ireland until 1900.
– Be able to assess the usefulness of a source for explaining the causes of the Easter Rising.
– Be able to understand how they could try to find more information out about the causes of the Troubles.
– Be able to write a concise judgement paragraph about the actions of the British on Bloody Sunday.
– Be able to identify the key features of the Good Friday Agreement.
– Be able to identify relevant information to explain why Britain was involved in India.
– Be able to write a narrative account of the role of India in World War Two.
– Be able to write an essay explaining why so many people died during Partition.
– Be able to state the differences between interpretations of the Indian involvement in East Pakistan.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– Oliver Cromwell in Ireland.
– British involvement in World War One.
– The origins of the British Empire – Roanoke, Trade, Prestige

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B, C and D

Module 6 - Unit 6: Protest

Key Concept

TBC

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

– What was Second Wave feminism?
– What impact did the Feminine Mystique have?
– Why did women have to fight for equal pay and access to abortion?
– Why was the European Union formed and why did Britain join?
– What benefits did the European Membership give Britons?
– Who were the Eurosceptics?
– How was the migration debate portrayed in the media?
– Should Britain rejoin the European Union?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

– Be able to state the key features of Second Wave Feminism.
– Be able to state differences on the role of women in the mid-Twentieth century.
– Be able to make inferences from sources about the Equal Pay Act and people’s attude to Abortion.
– Be able to write a narrative account of the European Union in the Twentieth Century.
– Be able to identify relevant material about migration to Britain.
– Be able to use sources to make inferences about the British attitudes to migration.
– Be able to write a judgement essay on the possibility of Britain re-joining the European Union.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

– The treatment of women in the medieval period.
– (RE) Attitudes to women in marriage, attitudes to contraception and the sanctity of life.
– The destruction caused by the Holocaust and World War Two.
– British colonial influence in India, Ireland receeding.
– The use of media to abolish slavery in UK.
– The use of media in the BLM movement.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, C and D