KS3 English

Module 1 - The Odyssey

Key Concept

Connections

Related Concept(s)

Character and setting

ATLs

Research – Information literacy: Finding, comprehending, and interpreting information. Students will routinely read through texts independently, before responding to a series of questions which ensure and encourage high levels of comprehension.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is an epic poem? When was ‘The Odyssey’ composed? How do conceptions of the hero differ in ‘The Odyssey’ and ‘The Iliad’? What is “in media res”? What is a simile? What is a metaphor? What is alliteration? What is a noun? What is a verb? What are the 4 purpose of a comma?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the conventions of epic poetry;

Be able to explain how Classical Greece’s transition from a set of warring states to a trading nation affected conceptions of the hero;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Homer’s literary and structural choices in ‘The Odyssey’ create meaning;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to identify a noun, verb, simile, metaphor, alliteration, media res;

Be able to use a comma in 4 different ways.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The Odyssey denotes our beginning of literature studies, tracking chronologically through some of the greatest works of time.

This unit helps students to understand how literature emerged in pre-literate societies, and how a text nearly 3,000 years old continues to resonate when read symbolically.

It also aims to provide students with an accessible but powerful introduction to form, context, content, theme, structure and language: the framework we use to help students organise their knowledge of literature.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 2 - Beowulf

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Context and structure

ATLs

Thinking – Critical-thinking skills and Transfer: Analysing and evaluating issues and ideas. Students will be required to discuss and debate the relationship between text and context, and how far an ancient text can remain relevant to the modern readers. Students will be required to transfer a famous dramatic scene into memorable prose.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Old English? What is a warrior society? What is an allegory? What is a kenning?
What is the archetypal narrative structure? What is an adjective? What is an adverb?
What is the purpose of quotation marks?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify Christian allusion in ‘Beowulf’;

Be able to explain why warrior societies are unsustainable;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Beowulf can be read as an allegory for Anglo-Saxon England’s transition from a warrior society to a Christian nation;

Be able to identify an archetypal narrative structure;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint.

Be able to identify an adjective, adverb and a kenning;

Be able to use quotations accurately.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to The Odyssey when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Epic poetry;
  • Context: Cultural transition gives rise to new heroic ideals;
  • Structure: Order, disorder, a reordering (we see this over and over again in The Odyssey);
  • Theme: Battling with monsters and descending into the underworld as something symbolic and universal; struggle as something heroic;
  • Language: Kenning as a type of metaphor.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A, B and D

Module 3 - The Canterbury Tales

Key Concept

Perspective

Related Concept(s)

Self-expression and context.

ATLs

Communication – Organize and depict information logically. Students will be required to amalgamate their knowledge alongside evidence of the text to construct logically organised and coherent analytical paragraphs.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Middle English literature? What is a pilgrimage?
What is a prologue? What is vernacular? What is diversity?
What is feminist literary criticism? How are creation myths structured?
What is satire? What is the fall of man? What is foreshadowing? What is a pronoun?
Why is The Canterbury Tales so important? What is the purpose of a semicolon?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to explain the differences between Old English and Middle English literature;

Be able to explain how paradisiacal settings foreshadow a ‘fall’;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how the wife of Bath can be read as both a feminist and a sexist portrayal of female character;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to identify a personal and possessive pronoun;

Be able to use a semicolon accurately.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, contrasts with The Odyssey and Beowulf when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): The Canterbury Tales can be understood, in part, as a mock epic. Chaucer’s verse does not concern the heroic deeds of the privileged and powerful; it is about the failings and hypocrisy of everyman.
  • Context: The emphasis in literature is beginning to be on ordinary folk and institutions (rather than heroes and Gods [as in The Odyssey and Beowulf]), and literature as a form of social critique (rather than an advocate of social norms and hierarchies (as in The Odyssey and Beowulf).
  • Structure: Literature is becoming more complex, as Chaucer plays with levels of stories within stories (as opposed to order, disorder and reordering); in this way, it foreshadows Cervantes’s metafiction.
  • Theme: The emphasis is not on the heroic or the universal (as in The Odyssey and Beowulf), but on the individual, and the messy, complex nature of life.
  • Language: Chaucer’s use of middle English (as opposed to French or Latin) marks TCT as the first great written work of English literature.
Module 4 - Lyric Poetry - The Sonnet

Key Concept

Creativity

Related Concept(s)

Structure and style

ATLs

Communication – Collaborate with peers and experts using a variety of digital environments and media; Make inferences and draw conclusions; Paraphrase accurately and concisely; Use and interpret a range of discipline-specific terms and symbols; Read critically and for comprehension; Negotiate ideas and knowledge with peers and teachers. Much of this unit will be delivered remotely, meaning that discussion and debate will rely on a range of digital media; students will need to convey their comprehension of each text, and of the sonnet form, from home, in a variety of ways.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a lyric poem? How is a sonnet structured?
What is a conceit? What is a Petrarchan sonnet?
What is a Shakespearean sonnet? What is the purpose of a colon? What are the different types of connectives?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify a sonnet through knowledge of its conventions;

Be able to identify where a writer has made choices that do not conform to these conventions;

Be able to identify a volta in a range of sonnets;

Be able to identify a conceit in a range of sonnets;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how writers’ literary and structural choices create meaning;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to identify the adding, sequencing and emphasising connectives;

Be able to use a colon accurately.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, the below:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): The sonnet is a lyric poem: a short expression of an often universal, emotional experience. This is in contrast to epic poetry, which narrate the adventures of the privileged
  • Context: The sonnet is the most enduring form of lyric poetry. It spans 500 years of Western culture, providing us with an opportunity to touch upon the Renaissance, Romanticism and Modernism, before more in depth study of the literary texts from these periods in later years.
  • Structure: The rigid nature of the structure allows for great creativity; this is a paradox which should invite debate, and contrasts significantly with the expansive texts and forms studied previously.
  • Theme: The emphasis is not on the heroic or the universal (as in The Odyssey and Beowulf), but on the individual, and the fragmented nature of emotional experience and memory.
  • Language: The conceit – or extended metaphor – should be a focus, and should draw upon and refer back to Homer’s use of extended metaphors in module 1.
Module 5 - The Ingenious Nobleman Don Quixote of La Mancha

Key Concept

Creativity

Related Concept(s)

Genres, point of view and setting.

ATLs

Thinking skills: Make unexpected or unusual connections between objects and/or ideas; Apply existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products or processes.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a novel? What is the Renaissance? What is an unreliable narrator?
What are chivalric romances? What is Philosophical idealism? What is metafiction?
What is a foil? What does ‘quixotic’ mean? What are the main word types and what role does each play in a sentence?
What are the different types of apostrophe?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to?

Be able to identify the novel form through knowledge of its conventions;

Be able to explain the effects of an unreliable narrator;

To offer a considered opinion on whether Don Quixote is a comic novel, a social commentary, or a tragedy?

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how writers’ literary and structural choices create meaning;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to identify nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns and connectives;

To be able to identify and use contractions and possessive apostrophes accurately.

Module 6 - The Ingenious Nobleman Don Quixote of La Mancha

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a novel? What is the Renaissance? What is an unreliable narrator?
What are chivalric romances? What is Philosophical idealism?
What is metafiction? What is a foil? What does ‘quixotic’ mean?
What are the main word types and what role does each play in a sentence?
What are the main punctuation types and what role does each play in a sentence?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to know?

Be able to identify the novel form through knowledge of its conventions;

Be able to explain the effects of an unreliable narrator;

To offer a considered opinion on whether Don Quixote is a comic novel, a social commentary, or a tragedy?

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how writers’ literary and structural choices create meaning;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to identify the adding, sequencing and emphasising connectives;

Be able to identify and use a comma, a semicolon, a colon, quotation marks and apostrophes accurately.

Module 1 - The Tragedy of Macbeth

Key Concept

Creativity

Related Concept(s)

Purpose and context

ATLs

Communication – Organize and depict information logically. Students will be required to amalgamate their knowledge alongside evidence of the text to construct logically organised and coherent analytical paragraphs.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a tragic play? What are the four traits of a tragic hero?
What is the Renaissance? What is regicide? What is the divine right of kings?
What is the difference between sex and gender? What is dramatic irony?
What is a monologue? What is a soliloquy? What is antimetabole?
What is pathetic fallacy? What are the 4 purpose of a comma?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the conventions of tragedy;

Be able to explain – clearly and concisely – the four traits of a tragic hero and identify them in Macbeth’s character and actions;

Be able to explain the contextual significance surrounding the play and its impact on content and characters;

Be able to explain the difference between Medieval values and Renaissance values;

Be able to explain the significance of classical and Christian references within the play;

Be able to effectively identify and explain the use of dramatic irony, antimetabole, monologue, soliloquy and pathetic fallacy;

Be able to explain the impact of the play on a contemporary audience and the playwright’s intentions;

Be able to use a comma in 4 different ways.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to the following texts when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Macbeth is a tragic play. How is this form different from epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf], lyric poetry [sonnets], the novel [Don Quixote])?
  • Context: The Renaissance; the gunpowder plot. Individual ambition challenging traditional forms of authority. We have seen this before in The Canterbury Tales. How is this different from individual loyalty to traditional forms of authority (seen in Beowulf and Don Quixote)?
  • Structure: High status, internal conflict, hamartia, tragic waste. How is this different from narrative of Classical heroes (Odysseus, Beowulf): High status, external conflict, overcoming, self-actualisation.
  • Theme: Individual ambition challenging traditional forms of authority. We have seen this before in The Canterbury Tales. How is this different from individual loyalty to traditional forms of authority (seen in Beowulf and Don Quixote)?
  • Language: Monologue, soliloquy. How are these different from the monologues of Odysseus and Beowulf (external acts versus internal conflict)?

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 2 - Marlowe's Doctor Faustus

Key Concept

Connections

Related Concept(s)

Context and intertextuality

ATLs

Research – Information literacy: Finding, comprehending, and interpreting information. Students will routinely read through texts independently, before responding to series of questions which ensure and encourage high levels of comprehension.

Thinking – Critical-thinking skills: Analysing and evaluating issues and ideas. Students will be required to discuss and debate the relationship between text and context, and how far an understanding of historical context informs our appreciation of a literary text.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the four traits of a tragic hero?
What is a Greek Tragedy?
What is a prologue?
What are the origins of a Faust story?
What is the difference between Renaissance and Medieval ideals?
How is Faustus seen as a Renaissance man?
What is Renaissance Humanism?
What is a monologue?
How is hell depicted in literature?
What is the difference between free will and predestination?
What is a morality play?
What is anti-Catholicism?
What is repentance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify a Greek Tragedy through knowledge of its conventions;

Be able to explain the difference between Renaissance and Medieval ideals;

Be able to identify the writer’s intentions in constructing characters and how they reflect context;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how writers’ literary and structural choices create meaning.

Be able to identify key themes through writer’s content and structure of play;

Be able to explain the significance of said themes in relation to character and context;

Be able to understand the structure of a morality play and its effect on the audience;

Be able to identify an adjective and an adverb;

Be able to use quotations accurately.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students thus far have studied a wide range of texts tracking through time chronologically (Homer’s ‘The Odyssey’, ‘Beowulf’, Chaucer’s ‘The Canterbury Tales’, The Sonnet Form, Shakespeare’s ‘Macbeth’) focusing on context and its impact on the texts. Students are aware of the shift in the voices we hear in each text throughout time; from early texts primarily focused on those in privileged positions (gods, heroes, warriors) to the emergence of new, ordinary voices. Students have previously studied Shakespeare’s Macbeth and so have a foundation of knowledge about the conflict between Middle Age ideals and Renaissance ideals, and the difference between communal and individual consciousness. By using their knowledge of context and their foundational knowledge of the four elements of a tragic hero, students should be able to transfer this knowledge to a new character from a later time period. Students are aware of the surrounding factors of Shakespeare’s life and will begin to learn the same regarding Marlowe’s life; this should, in turn, give them an appreciation of the impact of the writer’s personal life on their writing. Doctor Faustus has endured for many reasons; students will look at the play as a cultural artifact, the study of it adding cultural value to them. In writing about the story of Faustus, Marlowe chose a well-known legend which has been told many times in European literature. Christopher Marlowe is an important writer. With the exception of Shakespeare, he is probably the best-known and most influential of all Elizabethan dramatists, whose innovations (such as the use of blank verse on the stage) were widely copied and whose style of writing (the “mighty line”) was the most skilled and memorable. This unit will provide students with key contexts and evaluation of language techniques (oxymoron, metaphors, foreshadowing, hyperbole, punctuation for effect) for later, more in-depth study.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

ABD

Module 3 - Romantic Poetry (Wordsworth, Blake)

Key Concept

Perspective

Related Concept(s)

Theme and audience imperative

ATLs

Social – Seek out critical interpretations from others, including teachers and peers, and incorporate these into your reading of each text.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the Age of Enlightenment (1650-1780)? What is Romanticism (1780-1850) or the ‘Counter-Enlightenment’?
What are the core values of Enlightenment thinking (reason, progress, science, society)? What are the core values of Romanticism (imagination, emotion, nature, solitude)?
Who was Jean-Jacque Rousseau? What is pastoral? What did William Blake write about? What did William Wordsworth write about? What is a pronoun?
What is the purpose of a semicolon?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify Romantic poetry through knowledge of its conventions;

Be able to identify where a writer has made choices that conform to these conventions;

Be able to explain – clearly and coherently – the values of the Enlightenment and the Romantic movement;

Be able to discuss the similarities and differences in the poetry of Blake and Wordsworth;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how writers’ literary and structural choices create meaning;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to analyse carefully chosen language at sentence and word level;

Be able to identify a personal and possessive pronoun;

Be able to use a semicolon accurately.

Module 4 - Romantic Poetry (Byron, Keats, Shelley)

Key Concept

Please see above

Related Concept(s)

Please see above

ATLs

Please see above

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the Age of Enlightenment (1650-1780)? What is Romanticism (1780-1850) or the ‘Counter-Enlightenment’?
What are the core values of Enlightenment thinking (reason, progress, science, society)? What are the core values of Romanticism (imagination, emotion, nature, solitude)?
What are the values of Gothic literature? What did Lord Byron write about? What did Percy Bysshe Shelley write about? What did John Keats write about?
What is the purpose of a colon? What are the different types of connectives?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify Romantic poetry through knowledge of its conventions;

Be able to identify where a writer has made choices that conform to these conventions;

Be able to discuss the similarities and differences in the poetry of Early Romanticism and Late Romanticism;

Be able to explain the relationship between the late Romantic movement and Gothicism;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how writers’ literary and structural choices create meaning;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint;

Be able to analyse carefully chosen language at sentence and word level;

Be able to identify the adding, sequencing and emphasising connectives;

Be able to use a colon accurately.

Module 5 - Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus

Key Concept

Creativity

Related Concept(s)

Point of view and genres.

ATLs

Critical-thinking skills and Transfer: Analysing and evaluating issues and ideas. Students will be required to discuss and debate the relationship between text and context, and how far an ancient text can remain relevant to the modern readers. Students will be required to transfer a famous dramatic scene into memorable prose.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What does Gothic mean?
What is an embedded narrative?
What is a frame narrative?
What is an epistolary?
What did Romantic thinkers value?
What did Enlightenment thinkers value?
What is an unreliable narrator?
What is the “sublime”?
What is a motif?
What is a trope?
What is meant by the term patriarchal society?
What are the main word types and what role does each play in a sentence?
What are the main punctuation types and what role does each play in a sentence?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the conventions of Romanticism;

Be able to explain – clearly and concisely – the tropes of Gothic literature

Be able to explain the contextual significance surrounding the novel and its impact on content and characters

Be able to explain the difference between Enlightenment and Romantic values

Be able to explain the significance of mythology (Prometheus) and its links to Christianity within the novel

Be able to effectively identify and explain the use of motifs and pathetic fallacy within the novel

Be able to write clear and concise analytical paragraphs on extracts or quotations from the novel, with a clear link to context

Be able to use a semicolon

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to the following texts when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Frankenstein is a Gothic novel. How is this form different from epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf], lyric poetry [sonnets], the first modern novel [Don Quixote])?
  • Context: The 18th century; great advancements in science, the discovery of electricity. The Enlightenment and Romantic period. A continuation of the Renaissance, moving from religion towards a scientific understanding of the world. How is this different from Beowulf and The Canterbury Tales, and how does this link to Faustus (who also transgresses that line).
  • Structure: Embedded narratives, framing narratives and epistolaries. Do we still have the archetypal narrative structure (movement between chaos and order) and how can we link these new narrative styles to other non-linear styles? (E.g. In medias res)
  • Theme: Individual ambition challenging traditional forms of authority, new knowledge and movement towards science while still upholding Romantic values. Transgressing and the hero’s tragic flaw leading to their downfall (link to Macbeth and Faustus, and even mythology of Icarus and Prometheus).
  • Language: First person narrative, motifs of light and darkness and pathetic fallacy, and how all of this contributes to a feeling of horror and tension.
Module 6 - Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus

Key Concept

Please see above

Related Concept(s)

Please see above

ATLs

Please see above

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What does Gothic mean?
What is an embedded narrative?
What is a frame narrative?
What is an epistolary?
What did Romantic thinkers value?
What did Enlightenment thinkers value?
What is an unreliable narrator?
What is the “sublime”?
What is a motif?
What is a trope?
What is meant by the term patriarchal society?
What are the main word types and what role does each play in a sentence?
What are the main punctuation types and what role does each play in a sentence?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the conventions of Romanticism;

Be able to explain – clearly and concisely – the tropes of Gothic literature

Be able to explain the contextual significance surrounding the novel and its impact on content and characters

Be able to explain the difference between Enlightenment and Romantic values

Be able to explain the significance of mythology (Prometheus) and its links to Christianity within the novel

Be able to effectively identify and explain the use of motifs and pathetic fallacy within the novel

Be able to write clear and concise analytical paragraphs on extracts or quotations from the novel, with a clear link to context

Be able to identify and use a comma, a semicolon, a colon, quotation marks and apostrophes accurately.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to the following texts when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Frankenstein is a Gothic novel. How is this form different from epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf], lyric poetry [sonnets], the first modern novel [Don Quixote])?
  • Context: The 18th century; great advancements in science, the discovery of electricity. The Enlightenment and Romantic period. A continuation of the Renaissance, moving from religion towards a scientific understanding of the world. How is this different from Beowulf and The Canterbury Tales, and how does this link to Faustus (who also transgresses that line).
  • Structure: Embedded narratives, framing narratives and epistolaries. Do we still have the archetypal narrative structure (movement between chaos and order) and how can we link these new narrative styles to other non-linear styles? (E.g. In medias res)
  • Theme: Individual ambition challenging traditional forms of authority, new knowledge and movement towards science while still upholding Romantic values. Transgressing and the hero’s tragic flaw leading to their downfall (link to Macbeth and Faustus, and even mythology of Icarus and Prometheus).
  • Language: First person narrative, motifs of light and darkness and pathetic fallacy, and how all of this contributes to a feeling of horror and tension.
Module 1 - A Christmas Carol

Key Concept

Perspective

Related Concept(s)

Character and context

ATLs

Research – Information literacy: Finding, comprehending, and interpreting information. Students will routinely read through texts independently, before responding to a series of questions which ensure and encourage high levels of comprehension.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a novella? What is a stave?
What is Capitalism? What is Marxism?
What social injustices existed in Victorian society?
What is the Industrial Revolution? What is symbolism?
What does the term “semantic field” refer to?
What is pathetic fallacy? What are allusions?
What is personification? What are the 4 purpose of a comma?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to explain how literature can function as social critique and, more specifically, how A Christmas Carol highlights the injustices of Victorian society;

Be able to explain the differences between Capitalism, Socialism and Marxism and identify the characters who promote said concepts;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Dickens’ literary and structural choices create meaning;

Be able to identify and explain the effect of personified abstract nouns;

Be able to provide an in-depth analysis of the writer’s language choices including his choice of specific word groups to create meaning (eg verbs to create pace or highlight aggressive/gentle natures of a character);

Be able to use a comma in 4 different ways.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to the following texts when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): A Christmas Carol is a novella. How is this form different from epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf] and tragic plays (Macbeth, Doctor Faustus)? It focuses on the lives of ordinary people.
  • Context and theme: The industrial revolution. Individual responsibility and social injustice. Previous texts have focused on the relationship of the individual to society, in either upholding traditional values (The Odyssey, Beowulf, Don Quixote) or challenging these (The Canterbury Tales, Macbeth, Faustus, Romantic poetry, Frankenstein). Dickens reverses this to some degree, asking what society owes to the individual, and how the individual has a responsibility to the collective.
  • Structure: Structured as a parable, A Christmas Carol suggests that literature has a responsibility to critique social failings. We have seen this before in Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales.
  • Language:
  • Symbolism: As in The Odyssey, Beowulf, Macbeth, Doctor Faustus.
  • Pathetic fallacy: As in Macbeth, Frankenstein.
  • Allusions: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

A and C

Module 2 - Modernist Poetry

Key Concept

Creativity

Related Concept(s)

Structure and style

ATLs

Social – Seek out critical interpretations from others, including teachers and peers, and incorporate these into your reading of each text.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is modernism? What are the contextual factors out of which modernism emerged?
What are the typical conventions of modernist poetry? What was the Harlem Renaissance?
What is fragmentation? What is a stream of conciousness? What are new wholes?
What is imagism? What is the speaker in a poem? What is a verse and a stanza?
What is tone? What is diction? What is caesura? What is enjambment?
What is free verse?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Explain the typical effect of poetic and modernist conventions and how they are used to convey meaning or a lack of meaning;

Explain how modernist poetic conventions differ from Romantic conventions;

Explain how modernist literature can be seen as a response to the historical and cultural context of the early 1900s;

Explain the difference in tone between Victorian and modernist literature;

Explain how modernist poets use language and structure to convey a view of the world as futile, chaotic and confusing;

Explain how typical motifs in modernist poetry include the detrimental effects of war, industrialisation and urban life;

Embedding quotations;

Using critical adverbs.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Students will be studying the form of modernist poems in this unit. Students will be analysing both excerpts and entire poems from those such as T.S Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams and Wallace Stevens. Students will consider how the structure and language of modernist poems reflect the sense of futility and confusion of the period. Students will consider how this form is different from or similar to epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf, TCT], tragic plays [Macbeth, Doctor Faustus], poetry [sonnets and Romantic] and novellas [A Christmas Carol, Animal Farm].
  • Context and theme: Modernist poetry emerged between 1900 and 1930 and portrays the shift in culture and thinking at the time. Contextual factors to be explored include: the decline of religious faith, the decline of Enlightenment’s faith in reason (following the senseless slaughter of tens of millions during WWI) and the effect of technological advancements and urbanisation.
  • Structure: The structure of modernist poems often reflect the ontological conflict of the speaker. Poets will typically employ fragments, a stream of consciousness, free verse and a detached, insecure speaker who struggles to reflect a coherent or stable view of the world. Typically modernist poets will break from the optimism of Victorian literature and reject conventional poetic devices such as consistent structure, rhyme or rhythm.
  • Language: Modernist poets will often employ clear imagery and sharp language but often without any coherent message or meaning. Poets may employ imagism or new wholes in their writing.
  • Symbolism: As in The Odyssey, Beowulf, Macbeth, Doctor Faustus.
  • Foreshadowing: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, Frankenstein.
  • Allusions: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, A Christmas Carol.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

ABD

Module 3 - Animal Farm

Key Concept

Perspective

Related Concept(s)

Context and audience imperative

ATLs

Communication – Organize and depict information logically. Students will be required to amalgamate their knowledge alongside evidence of the text to construct logically organised and coherent analytical paragraphs.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Marxism? What is Communism?
What happened during the Russian Revolution?
What is a fable? What is an allegory?
What is a motif? What is meant by the term satire?
What is meant by the term dystopian?What is meant by propaganda?
What is passive voice? What is anthropomorphism? What is totalitarianism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to explain the differences between Marxism and Communism and explain the characters who promote said concepts (Old Major/Marx, Snowball/communism and Napoleon/Stalin)

Be able to explain how the historical context of the Russian revolution is used as a basis for the plot.

Be able to explain how the novel functions as an allegory- the farm/animals being an extended metaphor for Russia and its experience of revolution in the 1900s and the impact this has upon the reader.
Be able to identify and explain the impact of literary devices such as foreshadowing, rhetoric, anthropomorphism and the use of motifs.
Be able to explain how Orwell’s literary and structural choices create meaning.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to the following texts when instructing on:
Form (meaning type and genre): Animal Farm is a political fable in the form of an allegory. How is this form different from epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf] and tragic plays (Macbeth, Doctor Faustus), novellas (A Christmas Carol).
Context and theme: The Russian revolution. In Animal Farm, the themes of class, equality and inequality, and power and control are explored.
Structure: Structured as a circular plot. The ending of Animal Farm highlights that there will always be groups in society that abuse their power and oppress others (the pigs were always going to become tyrants). Orwell tries to emphasise this so that people/society will stop and change this behaviour. We have seen this before A Christmas Carol.
Language:Symbolism: As in The Odyssey, Beowulf, Macbeth, Doctor Faustus.
Foreshadowing: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, Frankenstein.
Allusions: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, A Christmas Carol

Module 4 - Things Fall Apart

Key Concept

Connections

Related Concept(s)

Context and intertextuality.

ATLs

Critical-thinking skills and Transfer: Analysing and evaluating issues and ideas. Students will be required to discuss and debate the relationship between text and context, and how we can apply literary theory to historical texts.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is colonisation? What is the British Empire? What are missionaries?
What is meant by cultural stereotyping? What is eurocentrism?
What is meant by the term preconceived ideas?What is perspective?
What is destiny? What is imagery, irony, foreshadowing, metaphors, similes, personification, symbolism?
What is intertextuality? What are allusions?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Explain how Achebe uses the Igbo language to bridge a cultural divide.

Explain how Achebe moves away from a eurocentric perspective.

Explain how Achebe challenges preconceived ideas of Africa and Africans.

Explain how Achebe uses structural and literary techniques to give Africans their own voice and repair their self-image.

Explain how Achebe uses the third person omniscient narrator to make objective and intrusive commentaries.

Explain how much the flexibility or the rigidity of the characters contribute to their destiny.

Analyse effectively the use of literary techniques – imagery, irony, foreshadowing, metaphors, similes, personification, symbolism – to convey meaning.
Gain an understanding of how Achebe’s use of allusions fortify his narrative.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

When teaching this unit, we should emphasise, at every teaching opportunity, links to the following texts when instructing on:

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Things Fall Apart is a novel and a tragedy because it documents both the personal downfall of Okonkwo and the broader erosion of the Igbo cultural world that Okonkwo wishes to defend. How is this form different from or similar to epic poetry [The Odyssey, Beowulf, TCT], tragic plays [Macbeth, Doctor Faustus], poetry [sonnets, modernism] and novellas [A Christmas Carol, Animal Farm].
  • Context: Things Fall Apart is set in the 1890s and portrays the clash between Nigeria’s white colonial government and the traditional culture of the indigenous Igbo people, but was written in the late 1950s as a response to centuries of European writing that had portrayed Africa as a “dark continent,” plagued by savagery and superstition. Oppression as in AF.
  • Theme: Varying Interpretations of Masculinity. As in The Odyssey, TCT, Macbeth, Dr Faustus. Power and control are explored as in Macbeth, Faustus, AF. Oppression as in AF.
  • Structure: The narrative structure of Things Fall Apart follows a cyclical pattern that chronicles Okonkwo’s youth in Umuofia, his seven-year exile in Mbanta, and his eventual return home. We have seen this before in A Christmas Carol, Animal Farm.
  • Language: Throughout Things Fall Apart Achebe uses straightforward diction and simple sentence structures. His style creates a sense of formality befitting a historical narrative told from a third-person omniscient point of view. In keeping his language direct and to the point, Achebe invests his prose with the feeling of neutral reportage. Achebe also includes Igbo vocabulary in his narrative.
  • Symbolism: Locusts (used in highly allegorical terms that foreshadow the arrival of the white settlers who feast on the resources of the Igbo); Fire (alluding to Okonkwo’s intense and dangerous nature). As in The Odyssey, Beowulf, Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, Animal Farm.
  • Foreshadowing: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, Frankenstein.
  • Allusions: As in Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, A Christmas Carol
Module 5 - To Kill A Mockingbird

Key Concept

Creativity

Related Concept(s)

Context and theme

ATLs

Communication – Organize and depict information logically. Students will be required to amalgamate their knowledge alongside evidence of the text to construct logically organised and coherent analytical paragraphs.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is a bildungsroman? What are the elements of Southern Gothic Fiction?
What social injustices existed in 1930s america?
What was the Scottsboro Boys Trial?
What was the Civil Rights Movement?
What is figurative language?
What are motifs and symbols? What is colloquial language?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

How does the genre have an effect on how the content is received?
Explain effectively how a first person narration can impact the content (Is the narrator reliable?).
Draw links between the context surrounding the novella and its influence on content and explain them clearly and concisely.

Analyse and explain how motifs and symbols are instrumental to the progression of the novella.

Think critically about the use of first person narration and colloquial language and its relevance to the content of the novella.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Form (meaning type and genre): Novelal, Bildungsroman, Southern Gothic Fiction – Childlike, humorous, nostalgic, innocent; as the novel progresses, increasingly dark, foreboding, and critical of society. How is this similar to/different from the progression of other texts studied (The Odyssey; Beowulf; Macbeth; Dr Faustus; Frankenstein; ACC.
  • Context: Written in 1957, published in 1960, set in mid 30s. Written with a current view point reflected on the past [The Odyssey; Things Fall Apart]. Social Injustice
  • Theme: The Coexistence of Good and Evil [Beowulf; Macbeth; Faustus; Frankenstein; ACC; AF]; The Importance of Moral Education [ACC; Things Fall Apart]; The Existence of Social Inequality [; Prejudice; As in TCT, Macbeth, Dr Faustus.; ACC; Animal Farm; Things Falls Apart].
  • Structure: Rising action. Events are arranged in chronological order. The novel can be divided into two parts: The first one focuses on the children and the story of Boo Radley, whereas the second one is centered on the adults and Tom Robinson’s trial. Many information the reader learns in Part 1 are important for the second part of the novel.
  • Language: Humorous and conversational. The novel includes a great deal of Southern vernacular to show the ways the characters all belong to the same community, yet occupy different positions due to class and education. [TCT; AF; ACC; Things Fall Apart]
  • Symbolism: Mockingbird / Boo Radley. The children’s changing attitude toward Boo Radley is an important measurement of their development from innocence toward a grown-up moral perspective. [Beowulf, Macbeth, Doctor Faustus, Animal Farm].
Module 6 - Literary Theory: Feminism and Postcolonialism

Key Concept

Connections

Related Concept(s)

Context and intertextuality

ATLs

Critical-thinking skills and Transfer: Analysing and evaluating issues and ideas. Students will be required to discuss and debate the relationship between text and context, and how we can apply literary theory to historical texts.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is traditional literary criticism?
What is Marxist literary theory?
What is Feminist literary theory?
What is Postcolonial literary theory?
What are the main word types and what role does each play in a sentence?
What are the main punctuation types and what role does each play in a sentence?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to explain the differences between traditional literary criticism and literary theory;

Be able to explain the differences between Marxist, Feminist and Postcolonial literary theory;

Be able to conduct – clearly and precisely – appropriately judged literary criticism on a range of texts previously studied;

Be able to analyse Duffy’s ‘The World’s Wife’ and ‘Feminine Gospels’ from a Feminist perspective;

Be able to analyse extracts from Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness’ from a Postcolonial perspective;

Be able to identify and use a comma, a semicolon, a colon, quotation marks and apostrophes accurately.