KS3 Art

Module 1 - Prehistoric Art

Key Concept

Aesthetic

Related Concept(s)

Representation

ATLs

Self Management- IV Affective Skills (managing their state of mind eg through resilience with practical tasks) Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the Formal Elements in Art?

Why do we have them?

What are primary colours? and list them

What are secondary colours? and list them

What are tertiary colours? and list them

What are the key characteristics of Prehistoric Art?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to list all eight formal elements;

Be able to identify primary/secondary/tertiary colours;

Be able to explain the importance of the formal elements in Art;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Prehistoric Art was a primary method of communicating a narrative at that time;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, mark making, printmaking

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The starting point of our curriculum is The Formal Elements. Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of art. It is believed that a person cannot create art without utilising at least a few of them. Secondly, they enable us to describe what an artist has done, analyse what is going on in a particular piece and communicate our thoughts and findings, using a common language.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically through exploration of materials; ink, pastels, printmaking.

Module 2 - Realism

Key Concept

Aesthetics

Related Concept(s)

Representation

ATLs

Communication- (Exchanging thoughts, messages and information effectively through interaction eg giving and receiving meaningful feedback to and from peers)

Self Management- V Reflection (considering what has been learned; choosing and using ATL skills eg keeping a sketchbook to record reflections).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Realism Art?

What is Form?

What is Tone?

What are the key characteristics of Realism?

What is the difference between Prehistoric Art and Realism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use form to create Realism Art;

Be able to identify a Realist painting;

Be able to identify tone within a Realist painting;

Be able to explain why Realist paintings can represent 3D forms;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how applying tone can make a 2D object appear 3D;Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students studied Prehistoric Art in module 1, so will understand the core foundations of Art History;

Students will also understand the importance of the formal elements and how to identify them in paintings.

It will be key to use this knowledge as a gateway to understanding and identifying the Realist period.

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Realist Painting (especially tone).

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 3 - Impressionism

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Composition

ATLs

Thinking- IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg Applying existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products or processes); Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Impressionism Art?

What is Texture?

What are the key characteristics of Impressionism?

What is the difference between Realism and Impressionism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use texture to create Impressionist outcomes;

Be able to identify an Impressionist painting;

Be able to identify texture within a Impressionist painting;

Be able to explain why Impressionist paintings can represent an artist’s impression of a scene;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering light within a Impressionist painting;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within an Impressionist Painting (especially texture);

Students will look into the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Impressionist paintings. This will build the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically.

Module 4 - Post Impressionism

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Composition

ATLs

Research- VI Information Literacy (Finding, interpreting, judging and creating information eg making connections between various sources of information)

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Post Impressionism Art?

What is Composition?

What are the key characteristics of Post Impressionism?

What is the difference between Impressionism and Post Impressionism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use composition to create Post Impressionist outcomes;

Be able to identify a Post Impressionist painting;

Be able to identify composition within a Post Impressionist painting (foreground, midground and background);

Be able to explain why Post Impressionist paintings can represent an artist’s impression of a scene;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering composition within an Post Impressionist painting;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, painting

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Post Impressionist Painting (especially composition); Students’ will build knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century to help them understand the focus of Post Impressionist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Impressionism Y7). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Post Impressionist paintings. This develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 5 - Bauhaus Art

Key Concept

Identity

Related Concept(s)

Presentation

ATLs

Communication- IN Communication (Exchanging thoughts, messages and information effectively through interaction eg giving and receiving meaningful feedback to and from peers) Thinking- IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg Creating original works and ideas).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Bauhaus Art?

What is Composition?

What is Colour?

What are the key characteristics of Bauhaus?

What is the difference between Post Impressionism and Bauhaus Art?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use composition and colour to create Bauhaus outcomes;

Be able to identify a Bauhaus piece;

Be able to identify composition within a Bauhaus piece;

Be able to explain why Bauhaus artists’ understanding of colour can pushes us to think beyond the representational;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering composition within a Bauhaus piece;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, collage

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Bauhaus piece (especially composition); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Bauhaus artists. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Impressionism, Post Impressionism Y7). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Bauhaus outcomes. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas.

Module 6 - Cubism

Key Concept

Identity

Related Concept(s)

Presentation

ATLs

Research- VII Visual literacy (Considering what has been learned; choosing and using ATL skills eg considering content What did I learn about today? What don’t I yet understand? What questions do I have now?) Thinking- IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg applying existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products or processes).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Cubism Art?

What is Shape?

What is Colour?

What are the key characteristics of Cubism?

What is the difference between Bauhaus Art and Cubism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use shape to create Cubism Art;

Be able to identify a Cubist painting;

Be able to identify geometric shapes within a Cubist painting’;

Be able to explain why Cubist paintings can represent 3D forms;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering perspective in a Cubist painting;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, mixed media

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Cubist Painting (especially shape); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Cubist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Post Impressionism Y7). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Cubist paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 1 - Baroque Art

Key Concept

Aesthetic

Related Concept(s)

Interpretation

ATLs

Self Management- IV Affective Skills (managing their state of mind eg through resilience with practical tasks)

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the Formal Elements in Art? Why do we have them?

What are primary colours? and list them

What are secondary colours? and list them

What are tertiary colours? and list them

What are the key characteristics of Baroque Art?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify all eight formal elements, theoretically and visually;

Be able to identify primary/secondary/tertiary colours;

Be able to explain the importance of the formal elements in Art;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Baroque Art was an early movement which commonly communicated religious narrative at that time;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Baroque Art mastered the technique ‘chiaroscuro’ to emphasise realism (so their paintings would look like actual events);

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students have studied a range of Art movements from Prehistoric Art in module 1 Y7 through to 20 Century Art, so they will have a developed understanding of Art History through different periods of time;

Students will also understand the importance of the formal elements and how to identify them in paintings.

It will be key to use this knowledge as a gateway to understanding and identifying the Baroque Art period.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills through exploration of materials; colouring pencils, digitally, tonal drawings

Module 2 - Eltham Palace (Art Deco)

Key Concept

Aesthetics

Related Concept(s)

Interpretation

ATLs

Research- VII Media Literacy (Interacting with media to use and create ideas and information eg Locating, organising, analysing, evaluating, synthesising and ethically using information from a variety of sources and media [including digital social media and online networks])

Thinking- IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg creating original works and ideas).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Art Deco?

What is Line?

What are the key characteristics of Art Deco?

What is the difference between Baroque Art and Art Deco?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use line to create Art Deco outcomes;

Be able to identify Art Deco outcomes;

Be able to identify line and pattern within an Art Deco piece;

Be able to explain why Art Deco pieces can represent luxury, glamour and exuberance;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering luxury within an Art Deco piece;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, painting

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within an Art Deco Piece (especially line); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Art Deco artists and designers. Students are already aware of the growing trend of alternative experimentations and the idea of using the change that is happening around them to be expressed in their work, at that time; which is evident in Art Deco pieces. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 3 - Clay Response (Art Deco)

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Representation

ATLs

Research- VI Information Literacy (finding, interpreting, judging and creating information eg making connections between various sources of information)

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Art Deco?

What is Pattern?

What are the key characteristics of Art Deco?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use pattern to create Art Deco patterns;

Be able to identify Art Deco outcomes;

Be able to identify line and pattern within an Art Deco piece;

Be able to explain why Art Deco pieces can represent luxury, glamour and exuberance;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering luxury within an Art Deco piece;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, digital art, ceramic (3D)

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within an Art Deco Piece (especially shape); Students has strong knowledge of Art Deco which will be drawn upon when considering design ideas for their Vase Task. Students are already aware of the growing trend of alternative experimentations and the idea of using the change that is happening around them to be expressed in their work, at that time; which is evident in Art Deco pieces. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically.

Module 4 - American Modernism

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Representation

ATLs

Self Management- III Organisation (managing time and tasks effectively eg selecting and using technology effectively and productively) and V Reflective (considering what has been learned; choosing and using ATL skills eg keeping a sketchbook to record reflections)

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is American Modernism?

What is Form?

What is Colour?

What are the key characteristics of American Modernism?

What is the difference between Art Deco and American Modernism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use form to create American Modernism outcomes;

Be able to identify an American Modernist painting;

Be able to identify form within a Georgia O’Keeffe painting;

Be able to explain how Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings simplify objects or scenes into minimal shapes and forms;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering organic forms within Georgia O’Keeffe’s flower paintings;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, painting, collage

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within an American Modernist Painting- Georgia O’keeffe (especially form); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understanding the focus of American Modernist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Post Impressionism Y7, Cubism Y7, Art Deco Y8 etc). Students are also aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in O’Keeffe’s paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 5 - Pop Art

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Presentation

ATLs

Communication- IN Communication (Exchanging thoughts, messages and information effectively through interaction eg giving and receiving meaningful feedback to and from peers)

Thinking- IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg Creating original works and ideas).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Pop Art?

What is Colour?

What are the key characteristics of Pop Art?

What is the difference between American Modernism and Pop Art?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use colour to create Pop Art outcomes;

Be able to identify a Pop Art piece;

Be able to identify colour within a Pop Art piece;

Be able to explain why Pop Artists can draw inspiration from sources in popular and commercial culture;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering colour within a Pop Art piece;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, 3D construction

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Pop Art piece (especially colour); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understanding the focus of Pop Art Artists. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Post Impressionism Y7, American Modernism Y8 etc). Students are also aware of the trend of using alternative materials and and the idea of using the change that is happening around them to be expressed in their work, at that time; which is evident in Pop Art pieces. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas.

Module 6 - Op Art

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Presentation

ATLs

Research- VII Media literacy(Interacting with media to use and create ideas and information eg Locating, organising, analysing, evaluating, synthesising and ethically using information from a variety of sources and media [including digital social media and online networks])

Thinking- IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg creating original works and ideas).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Op Art?

What is Pattern?

What are the key characteristics of Op Art?

What is the difference between Pop Art and Op Art?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use pattern to create Op Art outcomes;

Be able to identify an Op Art painting;

Be able to identify Pattern within an Op Art painting;

Be able to explain why Op Art paintings can gives the illusion of movement by the precise use of pattern and colour;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering pattern within a Op Art painting;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, digital art, collage

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Op Art Painting (especially pattern); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understanding the focus of Op Art painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Post Impressionism Y7, Cubism Y7, Pop Art Y8 etc). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Op Art paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (Criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 1 - The Renaissance

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Representation

ATLs

Self Management- IV Affective Skills (managing their state of mind eg through resilience with practical tasks)

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the Formal Elements in Art?

Why do we have them? What are primary colours? and list them What are secondary colours? and list them What are tertiary colours? and list them

What are the key characteristics of Renaissance Art? What does ‘Renaissance’ mean? What happened before the Renaissance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify all eight formal elements, theoretically and visually;

Be able to identify primary/secondary/tertiary colours;

Be able to explain the importance of the formal elements in Art;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Renaissance Art changed society at that time;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Renaissance Art reflected individualism;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, working with charcoal

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students have studied a range of Art movements from Prehistoric Art in module 1 Y7 through to 20 Century Art in Y8, so they will have a strong understanding of Art History through different periods of time; Students will also understand the importance of the formal elements and how to identify them in paintings. It will be key to use this knowledge as a gateway to understanding and identifying the Renaissance period.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task as well as a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills through exploration of materials; colouring pencils, digitally, tonal drawings, Quick drawing tasks (continuous line and blind drawing)

Module 2 - The Harlem Renaissance

Key Concept

Communication

Related Concept(s)

Representation

ATLs

Self Management- IV Affective Skills (managing their state of mind eg through resilience with practical tasks)

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What are the Formal Elements in Art? Why do we have them?

What are primary colours? and list them

What are secondary colours? and list them

What are tertiary colours? and list themWhat are the key characteristics of Renaissance Art?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify all eight formal elements, theoretically and visually;

Be able to identify primary/secondary/tertiary colours;

Be able to explain the importance of the formal elements in Art;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – how Renaissance Art was an early method of communicating a narrative at that time;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, photography, ink work

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Renaissance Painting. Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Fifteenth to sixteenth Century will be used to further understand the focus of Renaissance painters. Students will have learnt knowledge (from module 1) of painters and the aesthetics of the Renaissance Period. Students are already aware of the traditional methods used.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a formal analysis. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 3 - Fauvism

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Expression

ATLs

Research- VI Information Literacy (finding, interpreting, judging and creating information eg making connections between various sources of information);

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Fauvism Art?

What is Colour? What is Texture?

What are the key characteristics of Fauvism Art?

What is the difference between Renaissance and Fauvism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use colour to create Fauvism Art outcomes;

Be able to identify a Fauvism painting;

Be able to identify colour within a Fauvist painting;

Be able to explain why Fauvist paintings can represent an artist’s personal expression;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering colour and how it is used in an unrealistic way in Fauvist paintings;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, mixed media

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Fauvism Painting (especially colour); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Fauvist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Cubism Y7, Op Art Y8). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Fauvist paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ wealth of knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task. B- Students will develop their skills practically.

Module 4 - Fauvism

Key Concept

Change

Related Concept(s)

Expression

ATLs

Research- VI Information Literacy (finding, interpreting, judging and creating information eg making connections between various sources of information);

Thinking- X Transfer (utilising skills and knowledge in multiple contexts eg making connections between art movements).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Fauvism Art?

What is Colour? What is Texture?

What are the key characteristics of Fauvism Art?

What is the difference between Renaissance and Fauvism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use colour to create Fauvism Art outcomes;

Be able to identify a Fauvism painting;

Be able to identify colour within a Fauvist painting;

Be able to explain why Fauvist paintings can represent an artist’s personal expression;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – the importance of considering colour and how it is used in an unrealistic way in Fauvist paintings;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, mixed media

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Fauvism Painting (especially colour); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Fauvist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Cubism Y7, Op Art Y8). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings in their work, at that time; which is evident in Fauvist paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ wealth of knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.

Module 5 - Surrealism

Key Concept

Identity

Related Concept(s)

Composition

ATLs

Self Management- III Organisation and V Reflective (managing time and tasks effectively eg selecting and using technology effectively and productively)

Thinking- VIII Critical thinking and IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg applying existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products or processes).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Surrealism Art?

What is Shape? What is Form?

What are the key characteristics of Surrealism?

What is the difference between Fauvism and Surrealism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use shape to create Surrealism Art outcomes;

Be able to identify a Surrealism painting;

Be able to identify form within a Surrealist painting;

Be able to explain why Surrealist paintings can represent forms in unrealistic ways;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – that Surrealist paintings find importance in considering unexpected juxtapositions in ordinary scenes to challenge the viewer’s imagination;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, digital research, mixed media, collage

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Surrealist Painting (especially tone); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Surrealist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Cubism Y7, Op Art Y8, Fauvism Y9). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings, at that time; which is evident in Surrealist paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ wealth of knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a comprehension task. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas.

Module 6 - Surrealism

Key Concept

Identity

Related Concept(s)

Composition

ATLs

Self Management- III Organisation and V Reflective (managing time and tasks effectively eg selecting and using technology effectively and productively)

Thinking- VIII Critical thinking and IX Creativity and Innovation (The skills of invention – developing things and ideas that never existed before eg applying existing knowledge to generate new ideas, products or processes).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is Surrealism Art?

What is Shape? What is Form?

What are the key characteristics of Surrealism?

What is the difference between Fauvism and Surrealism?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to use shape to create Surrealism Art outcomes;

Be able to identify a Surrealism painting;

Be able to identify form within a Surrealist painting;

Be able to explain why Surrealist paintings can represent forms in unrealistic ways;

Be able to explain – clearly and precisely – that Surrealist paintings find importance in considering unexpected juxtapositions in ordinary scenes to challenge the viewer’s imagination;

Be able to find evidence to support one’s viewpoint in the work of others and their own;

The artistic skill(s) students will acquire: drawing, mixed media, collage

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of the formal elements should be drawn upon when explaining the elements within a Surrealist Painting (especially tone); Students’ knowledge of the key events during the Twentieth Century will be used to understand the focus of Surrealist painters. Students have prior knowledge of painters moving away from traditional norms at that time (eg Cubism Y7, Op Art Y8, Fauvism Y9). Students are already aware of the trend of unusual experimentations and the artist’s expression of their inner thoughts and feelings, at that time; which is evident in Surrealist paintings. This further develops and builds upon the students’ wealth of knowledge of Twentieth Century Art.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A- Frequent knowledge quizzes and a end of unit assessment. Students will also carry out a formal analysis. Criterion B- Students will develop their skills practically. Criterion C- Students will develop their creativity skills through experimentation of mediums and original ideas. Criterion D- Students will evaluate their work against the work of others.