Design and Technology

Module 1 - Iterative Design Challenge (Passive Amplifier Project)

Principles of Design and Technology
Identifying requirements and Materials considerations

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are softwoods?
  • What are hardwoods?
  • What are manufactured boards?
  • What is ACCESS FM?
  • How does injection moulding work?
  • How does blow moulding work?
  • How to use isometric paper.
  • What is a ration?
  • What is a fraction?
  • What is a percentage?
  • How is surface area calculated?
  • How is volume calculated?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To explain how a passive amplifier works/is used.
  • To be be able to understand why finishes are applied to products.
  • To provide appropriate finishes to woods.
  • To be able to create thumbnail sketches and to then further develop these. into a final solution.
  • To be able to prototype using materials and equipment such as card, craft knife,safety rule and a glue gun.
  • To understand the difference between one-off, batch, mass and continuous productions with examples of products.

 

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Learned about softwoods, hardwoods and manufactured boards in year 9.
  • All year groups will learn to analyse using ACCESS FM.
  • Maths based questions are learned in DT as well as in their maths lessons.
Module 2 - Iterative Design Challenge (Passive Amplifier Project)

Principles of Design and Technology
Learning from existing products and practice

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a thermoplastic?
  • What is a thermosetting plastics?
  • Why are materials protected?
  • How do you calculate percentages?
  • What are the different types of papers and boards?
  • What is one-off production?
  • What is batch production?
  • What is mass production?
  • What is continuous production?
  • What is JIT production? “

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to change the blade on a coping saw.
  • To be able to use a tenon saw with a bench hook.
  • To be able to use files safely.
  • To be able to use sandpaper and wet and dry paper appropriately.
  • To be able to apply wood stain and wood varnish.

 

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Link to year 9 upcycling project when working with plastics.
  • Methods of production is touched on in year 9 when looking at bread.
  • Mini keyring practical during M1 so students have some knowledge of using copings saws and files in the workshop.
  • Working safely in the workshop from all previous practical lessons.
Module 3 - Iterative Design Challenge (Sunglasses, chocolate and jewellery projects)

Principles of Design and Technology
Manufacturing processes and Techniques

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is pewter casting?
  • What is vacuum moulding?
  • What is laser cutting?
  • What is a ferous metal?
  • What is a non-ferous metal?
  • What are the properties of pewter?
  • What are the properties of MDF?
  • What are the properties of Acrylic?
  • What are the properties of Plywood?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to use the vacuum former.
  • Be able to manufacture a mould.
  • To be able to apply graphics to packaging.
  • To be able to use 2D design to draw basic designs.
  • To understand how the laser cutter works.
  • To be able to use anthropometric data and apply to a product (sunglasses)

 

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Students will have previously covered ferrous and non-ferrous metals and their properties.
  • Students have also covered alloys as part of year 9 Product design.
Module 4 - Module of Theory

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are modern materials?
  • What are smart materials?
  • What are composite materials?
  • What are the main categories of material properties?
  • What are stock forms?
  • How can you ensure the structiral integrity of a product?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To work firsthand with smart materials (polymorph).
  • To understand what dysgraphia is and think of a possible solution.
  • To understand stock forms and the benefits and limitations of stock forms.
  • Understand product safety measures and product testing.

 

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Link to learning of prior materials. Understand that all materials have different properties which make them ideal for different uses.
  • Students to be able to identify the correct material for a given context.
Module 5- Skills based Project

Principles of Design and Technology
Implications of wider issues and Design thinking and communication

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the main types of motion and forces?
  • What are microcontrollers?
  • What are inputs?
  • What are outputs?
  • What are tolerances?
  • What is wastage?
  • What is addition?
  • What is rapid prototyping?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To be able to identify different types of motion.
  • To work with materials where addition and wastage is used.
  • To understand the concept of input and outputs (microcontrollers).

 

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Linked to science lessons on forces at KS3.

Module 6- NEA starting from 1st June OCR Specification

READ THE OCR SPECIFICATION

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is primary research?
  • What is secondary research?
  • What is collaboration?
  • What is user-centered design?
  • What is a design brief?
  • What is a design specification?
  • What is a client profile?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students will be able to identify and prioritise problems and opportunities that are relevant to their chosen context.
  • Be able to write a design brief in response to a contextual challenge that considers the stakeholders that could have an interest in the potential outcome.
  • Be able to disassemble an existing product.
  • To develop at least one prototype that responds to the needs and/or wants and is fit for purpose.

 

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Linked to passive amplifier project, chocolate project, sunglasses project and jewellery project.
  • All students given a context to research, analyse and create a solution for.