LAB Learner Curriculum Map

YEAR 7 MODULES

General Principle or Big Idea (statement of inquiry)
The forgetting curve and strategies for revision

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is the forgetting curve?

How can the forgetting curve influence revision and learning?

How does the forgetting curve link to short term memory?

How can I improve my memory?

What physiological factors can affect memory?

What is spaced learning?

What is retrieval practise?

What is an illusion of confidence?

What makes an effective flashcard?

What are Cornell notes?

What is the Pomodoro technique?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the forgetting curve;

Be able to explain what the forgetting curve represents;

Be able to explain the link between the forgetting curve and long term memory; specifically thinking about retention and recapping information at correct intervals;

Be able to explain what spaced learning is and how it can be used to support revision;

Be able to create effective quizzes for revision and explain why and how they are effective;

Be able to create effective flashcards for revision and explain why and how they are effective;

Be able to create effective graphic organisers for revision and explain why and how they are effective;

Be able to reflect on the effectiveness of revision techniques.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The forgetting curve is a key part of understanding how memory works and therefore how learning works. This concept will need to be continually referred to throughout lessons to structure understanding of how students learn.

This unit aims to provide a frame for more complex ideas around metacognition and working memory.

General Principle or Big Idea (statement of inquiry)
Neurodiversity

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is neurodiversity?;

What is autistic spectrum disorder?;

What are the different ways autistic spectrum disorder can affect people?;

What is dyspraxia?

What is dyslexia?;

What is ADHD?

What is tourettes?;

What is dyscalculia?;

What is dysgraphia?;

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to explain and define different forms of neurodiversity;

Be able to explain the misconceptions and myths regarding different forms of neurodiversity;

Be able to show understanding and empathy for a wide range of people;

Be able to articulate some of the current problems faced by people with neurodiversity today;

Be able to explain how school policies and structures can support people with neurodiversity.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Neurodiversity unit will provide students with a way of understanding others around them and becoming more empathetic.

The unit will cover how understanding neurodiversity can help us to understand our own neuroscience and see common trends in human behaviour and psychology.

General Principle or Big Idea (statement of inquiry)
Philosophy and Ethics Unit

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

What is philosophy?

What is a value?

What is a moral?

What are ethics?

What is moral relativism?

What does objective mean?

What does subjective mean?

What does untenable mean?

What is Utilitarianism?

What’re the differences between act utilitarianism and rule utilitarianism?

What is a hedonist?

What is the problem of evil?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to articulate the idea of moral relativism

Be able to explain the differences between morals, values and ethics

Be able to explain the key arguments for and against moral relativism

Be able to explain your viewpoint on moral relativism

Be able to explain the difference between an objective and subjective view.

Be able to articulate what the rule of utility is

Be able to explain the differences between act and rule utilitarianism

To explain their view on the problem of evil