KS3 Music

Performing Arts strives to provide a varied, engaging and inclusive curriculum where students will learn to be creative, confident and proficient performing artists. Our curriculum is built on the fundamental key skills in performing, composing, devising and appraising. Through these skills, we explore a breadth of genres and wider social and historical contexts with the aim of building cultural capital and empowering students to appreciate the performing arts throughout their lives.

Module 1 -Folk Music (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The form of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how forms of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

  • Criterion A: Understanding what the features of the genre is by exploring a range of performances and analysing the skills used
  • Criterion B: Understanding what skills they will need in order to create a piece for performance

Links to prior learning

The starting point of our curriculum is The Music Elements (DR SMITH) Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of music. It is believed that a person cannot compose music without including these into their piece. Secondly, they enable us to describe what you can hear, analyse what the composers are and communicate our thoughts and findings, using the common and universal language of music.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Folk music from?
  • What instruments are used in Folk music?
  • What is celtic music?
  • What is a Sea shanty?
  • What chords are usually played in Folk songs?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe the DR SMITH used in Folk music
  • Be able to understand the purpose and context of Folk music
  • Be able to perform Folk songs with voice, keyboard and ukulele
  • Be able to create an arrangement of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • Be able to understand how to perform as an ensemble
Modules 2 & 3 - Musicals (performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

Link to assessment

All summative tasks explore how representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

  • Goal : A music magazine “Music Alive!” has asked you to help them to develop a feature on Musicals for readers to understand how Musicals represent society and how they can express ourselves.
  • Role: A young music journalist
  • Audience: Other musicians
  • Situation : The task involves investigating the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and performing a musical song
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce magazine feature- investigate/critique a musical genre and song (A)
  • Develop an artist intention for your Musical performance (B)
  • A completed performance (C)
  • Appraise and Reflect on your performance and your project as a whole (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about Folk music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of musical theatre overtime. The students’ ability to listen to music (DR SMITH) performing and composing music will support their learning.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are Musicals?
  • How/When did musicals begin?
  • What is a “triple-threat”?
  • What instruments are used in Musicals?
  • What different types of song and music are found in a musical?
  • What are the sub-genres of Musicals?
  • What are the key music features of musicals?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To understand how and when Musicals originated
  • To identify music elements (DR SMITH) in Musicals
  • To understand different composer’s styles when they write musicals
  • To reflect on how music enhances/detracts from on-stage action
  • Be able to perform musical songs as a solo and in small groups
Modules 4 & 5 - Programme Music (Composition)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Composition can be effective form of communication to reflect human capability and development to an audience.

Link to assessment

All summative tasks investigate programme music composers who communicate human capability and development through the elements of music, then create your own composition that can attempt to do the same to the intended audience

  • Goal : A local primary school has asked you to help them to develop students understanding of how programme music is used to reflect human capability and development
  • Role: A young composer
  • Audience: Primary school students
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other compositions and creating your own finalised composition
    • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce information pack:
      investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your programme music composition (B)
    • A completed composition (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements through musical theatre music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ are now being introduced to the basics of DAW’s and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the features of programme music and how are these features used in the music?
  • What is Romantic music (time period)?
  • What has influenced or inspired programme Music?
  • How does programme Music relate to other music genres?
  • What is the background and purpose of programme music?
  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own programme music?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?
  • How will you develop your ideas to achieve artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to define what programme music is
  • Be able to reflect on the elements of music (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to know what the artistic intention of the programme music you are creating
  • Be able to create initial ideas for your programme music composition
  • Be able to justify the knowledge you have gained to help you think creatively
  • Be able to use DAW (Soundtrap) to create your own composition
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to compose creative ideas of programme music using DAW (Soundtrap)
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve
Module 6 - Whole Class Performance (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

Link to assessment

All summative task investigate how musicians Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

  • C: Creating/Performing: Students will perform as an ensemble
  • D: Evaluating: Students will evaluate their performance, reflecting on their skill development

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a typical pop song structure?
  • What is a chord?
  • How do you play the fundamental notes on the keyboard, guitar, ukulele, bass?
  • What Warm ups can help you practise songs?
  • What skills do you need for rehearsal?
  • How do you work effectively in a group in preparation for performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to listen to songs and identify the elements confidently (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to be confident in singing
  • Be able to read instrument chord charts and display them practically
  • To be able to play the fundamental chord patterns (Major and Minor chords)
  • Be able to work as a band/team and self-manage with rehearsal plans
  • Be able to give regular feedback (self and peer)
  • Be able to perform in front of an audience
Module 1 - Reggae Music (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The form of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

Link to assessment

  • All summative tasks look at how forms of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways
    • Criterion A: Understanding what the features of the genre is by exploring a range of performances and analysing the skills used
    • Criterion B: Understanding what skills they will need in order to create a piece for performance

Links to prior learning

In Year 7 students would have been exposed to the elements of music. This module will enable students to recall this. The starting point of our curriculum is The Music Elements (DR SMITH) Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of music. It is believed that a person cannot compose music without including these into their piece. Secondly, they enable us to describe what you can hear, analyse what the composers are and communicate our thoughts and findings, using the common and universal language of music.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Reggae from?
  • What instruments are used in Reggae?
  • What typical lyrics do we hear in Reggae?
  • Who is Bob Marley?
  • What is offbeat?
  • What are the sub-genres of Reggae?
  • What is a typical Reggae structure?
  • What is a bassline? What is a triad?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise the typical chords used in Reggae
  • Be able to describe the DR SMITH used in Reggae
  • Be able to perform Reggae songs on the keyboard, ukulele, drums and guitar
  • Be able to create an arrangement of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • Perform a short piece with moderate accuracy
Modules 2 & 3 - Film Music (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

Link to assessment

All summative tasks explore how representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

  • Goal : A music magazine “Music Alive!” has asked you to help them to develop a feature on Film Music for readers to understand how Film
  • Music can represent society and how they can express themselves.
  • Role: A young music journalist
  • Audience: Other musicians
  • Situation : The task involves investigating the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and performing a Film music song
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce magazine feature- investigate/critique a genre of Film music and song (A)
  • Develop an artist intention for your Film music song performance (B)
  • A completed performance (C)
  • Appraise and Reflect on your performance and your project as a whole (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about Reggae music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of film music overtime. The students’ ability to listen to music (DR SMITH) performing and composing music will support their learning.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is film music?
  • What instruments are used in film music?
  • What is a soundtrack?
  • What is diegetic vs non-diegetic music?
  • What is a leitmotif?
  • How are leitmotifs composed?
  • What are the key music features of Film music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand how film music originated
  • Be able to describe how classical music has been used in films
  • Be able to reflect on how film enhances/detracts from the on-screen action
  • Be able to describe the music elements in different types of film music
  • Be able to perform film music using keyboard/string skills
Modules 4 & 5 - Video Game Music (Composition)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Composition can be effective form of communication to reflect human capability and development to an audience

Link to assessment

All summative tasks investigate video game music composers who communicate human capability and development through the elements of music, then create your own composition that can attempt to do the same to the intended audience

  • Outline of summative assessment task(s) including assessment criteria:
  • Goal : A local primary school has asked you to help them to develop students understanding of how video game music is used to reflect human capability and development
  • Role: A young composer
  • Audience: Primary school students
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other compositions and creating your own finalised composition
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce information pack:
    • Investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your programme music composition (B)
    • A completed composition (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements through film music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ would have been introduced to the basics of DAW’s in Y7 and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is video game music?
  • What is a leitmotif?
  • What does 8bit mean?
  • What is a theme?
  • What is a DAW?
  • What are the features of video Game music and how are these features used in the music?
  • What has influenced or inspired video game Music?
  • How does video game Music relate to other music genres?
  • What is the history, background and purpose of video game music?
  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own video game music?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to define what video game music is
  • Be able to reflect on the elements of music (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to know what the artistic intention of the video game music you are creating
  • Be able to create initial ideas for your video game music composition
  • Be able to justify the knowledge you have gained to help you think creatively
  • Be able to use DAW (Soundtrap) to create your own composition
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to compose creative ideas of video game music using DAW (Soundtrap)
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve
Module 6 - Axis of Awesome (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

Link to assessment

All summative task investigate how musicians Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

  • C: Creating/Performing: Students will perform as an ensemble
  • D: Evaluating: Students will evaluate their performance, reflecting on their skill development

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the Axis of Awesome?
  • What is the “4-chord-song” trick?
  • What is a major and minor chord?
  • How do you play the fundamental chords on the keyboard, guitar, ukulele, bass?
  • How do you warm up your voice?
  • How do you sing over the 4-chords?
  • How do you create your own 4-chord mash-up/medley?
  • What performance skills do you need for a live performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to listen to songs and identify the elements confidently (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to read instrument chord charts and display them practically
  • To be able to play the fundamental chord patterns (Major and Minor chords)
  • Be able to work as a band/team and self-manage with rehearsal plans
  • Be able to give regular feedback (self and peer)
  • Be able to perform in front of an audience
Module 1 - Blues Music (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The form of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how forms of aesthetics through individuals and civilizations can be interpreted in different ways

  • Criterion A: Understanding what the features of the genre is by exploring a range of performances and analysing the skills used
  • Criterion B: Understanding what skills they will need in order to create a piece for performance

Links to prior learning

In Year 7 and 8, students would have been exposed to the elements of music. This module will enable students to recall this. The starting point of our curriculum is The Music Elements (DR SMITH) Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of music. It is believed that a person cannot compose music without including these into their piece. Secondly, they enable us to describe what you can hear, analyse what the composers are and communicate our thoughts and findings, using the common and universal language of music.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Blues from?
  • What is the purpose and context of Blues music?
  • What is the Blues scale?
  • What is the 12 Bar Blues?
  • What is improvisation and syncopation?
  • What is a chord sequence?
  • What is a bassline? What is a triad?
  • What is in a Maj7 chord a min7 chord?
  • What music artists are associated with Blues music?
  • What are the musical elements of Blues music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise the use of the Blues Scale
  • Be able to describe accurately a chord sequence and the 12 Bar Blues
  • Be able to perform the 12 Bar Blues on the keyboard, guitar or ukulele
  • Be able to create an arrangement of a piece and perform as an ensemble
  • How to improvise using the blues scale
Modules 2 & 3 - Protest Music (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

Link to assessment

All summative tasks look at how representing social constructions of reality can change how we express ourselves

  • Goal : A music magazine “Music Alive!” has asked you to help them to develop a feature on Protest Music for readers to understand how Protest Music can represent society and how they can express themselves.
  • Role: A young music journalist
    Audience: Other musicians
  • Situation : The task involves investigating the context, purpose and features, appraising other performances and performing a Protest song
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce magazine feature- investigate/critique
    • Protest music and song (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your Protest song performance (B)
    • A completed performance (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect on your performance and your project as a whole (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about the Blues music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of protest music overtime. The students’ ability to understand chords, chord progressions, performing and composing music will support their learning.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a protest song?
  • What are protest songs usually about?
  • Why do we have protest songs?
  • Why do you think some protest songs are catchy?
  • What are the common types of pop structures?
  • What are the common types of pop chord sequences?
  • How do you create protest lyrics?
  • What are the key music features of Protest music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • To recognise a protest song
  • To describe the music elements in different types of protest songs
  • To perform protest songs independently and in small groups
  • To create lyrics of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • To understand different types of chord progressions to develop songs
  • To reflect on how protest music is a form of expression (SOI)
Modules 4 & 5 - DAW Dance Music (Composition)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Composition can be effective form of communication to reflect human capability and development to an audience

Link to assessment

All summative tasks investigate DAW Dance music composers who communicate human capability and development through the elements of music, then create your own composition that can attempt to do the same to the intended audience

  • Goal : A local primary school has asked you to help them to develop students understanding of how DAW Dance music is used to reflect human capability and development
  • Role: A young composer
  • Audience: Primary school students
  • Situation : The task involves researching the context, purpose and features, appraising other compositions and creating your own finalised composition
  • Product/Performance/Purpose: Produce information pack:
    • Investigate/critique (A)
    • Develop an artist intention for your DAW music composition (B)
    • A completed composition (C)
    • Appraise and Reflect (D)

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements through film music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ would have been introduced to the basics of DAW’s in Y7 and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is video game music?
  • What is a leitmotif?
  • What does 8bit mean?
  • What is a theme?
  • What is a DAW?
  • What are the features of video Game music and how are these features used in the music?
  • What has influenced or inspired video game Music?
  • How does video game Music relate to other music genres?
  • What is the history, background and purpose of video game music?
  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own video game music?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to define what video game music is
  • Be able to reflect on the elements of music (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to know what the artistic intention of the video game music you are creating
  • Be able to create initial ideas for your video game music composition
  • Be able to justify the knowledge you have gained to help you think creatively
  • Be able to use DAW (Soundtrap) to create your own composition
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to compose creative ideas of video game music using DAW (Soundtrap)
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve
Module 6 - In at the Deep End (Performance)

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

Link to assessment

All summative task investigate how musicians Play, in the form of different genres, can develop Identities in formation and self-esteem as well as relationships in cooperation and team

  • C: Creating/Performing: Students will perform as an ensemble
  • D: Evaluating: Students will evaluate their performance, reflecting on their skill development

Links to prior learning

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What makes a good song?
  • How do you play the fundamental chords on the keyboard, guitar, ukulele, bass?
  • How do you play the fundamental rhythmic patterns on the drum kit?
  • What self-management/personable skills do you need for rehearsal?
  • What performance skills do you need for a live performance?
  • In what ways can the Elements of Music be refined or manipulated to create new arrangements of an existing song or piece of music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to listen to songs and identify the elements confidently (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to read instrument chord charts and display them practically
  • To be able to play the fundamental chord patterns (Major and Minor chords)
  • Be able to work as a band/team and self-manage with rehearsal plans
  • Be able to give regular feedback (self and peer)
  • Be able to perform in front of an audience