KS3 Music

Introduction to Music Elements and Appraising (Dr. Smith)

Module 1 - Building Bricks

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the Elements of Music have been communicated and interpreted by musicians leads to the many and varied genres of global music showing differences in personal and cultural expression.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the Elements of Music? (DR SMITH)
  • What Elements of Music allow us to communicate across various genres?
  • What different stimuli do composers use when creating and composing music?
  • How to use key terminology related to the elements of music when describing a piece?
  • What are the families of instruments in the orchestra?
  • What is a semi breve, a minim, a crotchet, a quaver?
  • What is a time signature?
  • What is a chord?
  • What is notation?
  • What is the treble clef?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify the music elements (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to describe most of DR SMITH in a piece
  • Be able to explain composer’s intentions for choosing those music elements
  • Be able to reflect on the music skills in listening/appraising, performing, composing
  • Be able to explain the importance of the elements in music when composing for a narrative
  • Be able to create a compositional plan in the effort to create a piece

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

The starting point of our curriculum is The Music Elements (DR SMITH) Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of music. It is believed that a person cannot compose music without including these into their piece. Secondly, they enable us to describe what you can hear, analyse what the composers are and communicate our thoughts and findings, using the common and universal language of music.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of unit assessment.
Students will also carry out a comprehension task (using DR SMITH)

Criterion C – Students will think creatively by organising ideas to compose a piece of music.

  • What initial ideas do you have for your performance/composition?
  • How have you used the knowledge of the musical elements to help you think creatively?
  • Why will these ideas lead to a successful outcome?

Exploring music genres and wider social/historical contexts to build cultural capital on our students’ world around them

Module 2 - Folk Music

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Folk music grew from a need to express personal and cultural expression and to create an identity through perspectives of community, establishing musical structures.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Folk music from?
  • What instruments are used in Folk music?
  • What is a Sea shanty?
  • What is a Jig?
  • What chords are usually played in Folk songs?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to describe the DR SMITH used in Folk music
  • Be able to understand the purpose and context of Folk music
  • Be able to perform Folk songs on the keyboard, ukulele, drums and guitar
  • Be able to create an arrangement of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • Be able to understand how to perform as an ensemble

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the elements of music. They will be able to establish links between instruments of the orchestra and of Folk music. The students’ ability to read pitch, rhythm on instruments will give them the tools needed to read and create music as to how to critically assess their and their peers’ work using correct terminology.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of module assessment.
  • Criterion B – Developing skills on piano /tuned instruments.
    Performance of arranged/composed piece in ensemble
  • Criterion D – Responding to the piece you have arranged/composed
Module 3 - Musical Theatre

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The effect of songs and music from stage musicals conveys the identities and relationships of characters on stage which is communicated to the audience through expression and a variety of different musical genres.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is Musical Theatre?
  • How/When did musicals begin?
  • What is a “triple-threat”?
  • What instruments are used in Musical Theatre?
  • What different types of song and music are found in a musical?
  • What are the sub-genres of Musical Theatre?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand how Musical Theatre originated
  • Be able to identify music elements (DR SMITH) in Musicals
  • Be able to understand different composer’s styles when they write musicals
  • Be able to reflect on how musicals enhances/detracts from the on-stage action
  • Be able to perform/compose musical theatre songs as a solo and in small groups

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about Folk music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of musical theatre overtime. The students’ ability to listen to music (DR SMITH) performing and composing music will support their learning.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of module assessment.
  • Criterion B – Developing skills to perform and Musical Theatre songs
  • Criterion D – Students will review/reflect on their progress

MYP Common Assessment – Composition Project

Module 4 - Using a DAW: Programme Music 1

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The identity of programme music relies heavily on the effective composition of effective music created using digital technology showing scientific and technical innovation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the features of programme music and how are these features used in the music?
  • What has influenced or inspired programme Music?
  • How does programme Music relate to other music genres?
  • What is the history, background and purpose of programme music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to define what programme music is
  • Be able to reflect on the elements of music (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to know what the artistic intention of the programme music you are creating
  • Be able to create initial ideas for your programme music composition
  • Be able to justify the knowledge you have gained to help you think creatively

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about music elements through musical theatre music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ are now being introduced to the basics of DAW’s and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Knowing and Understanding

i. Demonstrate awareness of the music
ii. Demonstrate awareness of the role of the music.
iii. Demonstrate awareness of knowledge gained and music created.

Criterion C – Thinking Creatively

i. Identify an artistic intention
ii. Identify alternatives and perspectives.
iii. Demonstrate the exploration of ideas.

Module 5 - Using a DAW: Programme Music 2

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The identity of programme music relies heavily on the effective composition of effective music created using digital technology showing scientific and technical innovation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own programme music?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?
  • How will you develop your ideas to achieve the artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall what programme music is and how the music elements are used
  • Be able to use DAW (Soundtrap) to create your own composition
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to compose creative ideas of programme music using DAW (Soundtrap)
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the fundamental knowledge of Programme music and will now be able to apply this and establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ are now being introduced to the basics of DAW’s and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion B – Developing Skills

i. Demonstrate learning and development of skills and techniques.
ii. Demonstrate using skills and techniques to create or perform music.

Criterion D – Responding

i. Identify connections between the music, its context and your prior learning.
ii. Recognise what inspires or influences music.
iii. Evaluate certain principles/elements of music.

Establishing links between all modules studied so far to develop performance skills

Module 6 - Whole Class Performance

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

To build holistic musical skills and an understanding of how to play as a whole class band to improve communication as part of a team using ukulele, keyboard, guitar and bass. Build essential performance skills and develop a culture of performing together amongst students that will promote a music identity, achievement and attainment in music.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a typical pop song structure?
  • What is a chord?
  • How do you play the fundamental notes on the keyboard, guitar, ukulele, bass?
  • What Warm ups can help you practise songs?
  • What skills do you need for rehearsal?
  • How do you work effectively in a group in preparation for performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to listen to songs and identify the elements confidently (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to be confident in singing
  • Be able to read instrument chord charts and display them practically
  • To be able to play the fundamental chord patterns (Major and Minor chords)
  • Be able to work as a band/team and self-manage with rehearsal plans
  • Be able to give regular feedback (self and peer)
  • Be able to perform in front of an audience

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice
  • Criterion B – Develop skills on instruments, logging progress and setting targets to develop
  • Criterion D – Reflecting on their final performance and progress

Exploring Music Elements and Appraising (Dr. Smith)

Module 1 - The Elements of Music

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the Elements of Music have been communicated and interpreted by musicians leads to the many and varied genres of global music showing differences in personal and cultural expression.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the Elements of Music? (DR SMITH)
  • What Elements of Music allow us to communicate across various genres?
  • What different stimuli do composers use when creating and composing music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to identify the music elements (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to describe most of DR SMITH in a piece
  • Be able to explain composer’s intentions for choosing those music elements
  • Be able to reflect on the music skills in listening/appraising, performing, composing
  • Be able to explain the importance of the elements in music when composing for a narrative
  • Be able to create a compositional plan in the effort to create a piece

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

In Year 7 students would have been exposed to the elements of music. This module will enable students to recall this. The starting point of our curriculum is The Music Elements (DR SMITH) Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of music. It is believed that a person cannot compose music without including these into their piece. Secondly, they enable us to describe what you can hear, analyse what the composers are and communicate our thoughts and findings, using the common and universal language of music.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of unit assessment.
Students will also carry out a comprehension task (using DR SMITH)

Criterion C – Students will think creatively by organising ideas to compose a piece of music.

  • What initial ideas do you have for your performance/composition?
  • How have you used the knowledge of the musical elements to help you think creatively?
  • Why will these ideas lead to a successful outcome?

Exploring music genres and wider social/historical contexts to build cultural capital on our students’ world around them

Module 2 - Reggae

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Reggae music grew from a need to express personal and cultural expression and to create an identity through perspectives of community, establishing musical structures.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Reggae from?
  • What instruments are used in Reggae?
  • What typical lyrics do we hear in Reggae?
  • Who is Bob Marley?
  • What is offbeat?
  • What are the sub-genres of Reggae?
  • What is a typical Reggae structure?
  • What is a bassline? What is a triad?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise the typical chords used in Reggae
  • Be able to describe the DR SMITH used in Reggae
  • Be able to perform Reggae songs on the keyboard, ukulele, drums and guitar
  • Be able to create an arrangement of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • Perform a short piece with moderate accuracy

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the elements of music. They will be able to establish links between instruments of the orchestra and of the Reggae, permitting a reflection on innovation within the genre. The students’ ability to read pitch, rhythm on instruments will give them the tools needed to read and create music as to how to critically assess their and their peers’ work using correct terminology.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of module assessment.
  • Criterion B – Developing skills on piano /tuned instruments.
    Performance of arranged/composed piece in ensemble
  • Criterion D – Responding to Reggae music and the piece you have arranged/composed
Module 3 - Film Music

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Film Music enhances the communication of on-screen visual ideas by the presentation of a musical soundtrack to the audience which is dependent upon the personal and cultural expression of both the film writer/ composer and viewer/listener.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is film music?
  • What instruments are used in film music?
  • What is a soundtrack?
  • What is diegetic vs non-diegetic music?
  • What is a leitmotif?
  • How are leitmotifs composed?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand how film music originated
  • Be able to describe how classical music has been used in films
  • Be able to reflect on how film enhances/detracts from the on-screen action
  • Be able to describe the music elements in different types of film music
  • Be able to use DAW to create film music

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about Reggae music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of film music overtime. The students’ ability to listen to music (DR SMITH) performing and composing music will support their learning.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of module assessment.
  • Criterion B – Developing skills to compose film music using DAW
  • Criterion D – Review/reflect on the skills they have learned and what should be developed

MYP Common Assessment – Composition Project

Module 4 - Using a DAW: Music for Video Games 1

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The identity of a video or computer game or character relies heavily on the effective composition of effective music created using digital technology showing scientific and technical innovation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is video game music?
  • What is an ostinato?
  • What is a theme?
  • What is a DAW?
  • What are the features of video Game music and how are these features used in the music?
  • What has influenced or inspired video game Music?
  • How does video game Music relate to other music genres?
  • What is the history, background and purpose of video game music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to define what video game music is
  • Be able to reflect on the elements of music (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to know what the artistic intention of the video game music you are creating
  • Be able to create initial ideas for your video game music composition
  • Be able to justify the knowledge you have gained to help you think creatively

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about music elements through film music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ would have been introduced to the basics of DAW’s in Y7 and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Knowing and Understanding

i. Demonstrate awareness of the music
ii. Demonstrate awareness of the role of the music.
iii. Demonstrate awareness of knowledge gained and music created.

Criterion C – Thinking Creatively

i. Identify an artistic intention
ii. Identify alternatives and perspectives.
iii. Demonstrate the exploration of ideas.

Module 5 - Using a DAW: Music for Video Games 2

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The identity of a video or computer game or character relies heavily on the effective composition of effective music created using digital technology showing scientific and technical innovation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own video game music?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?
  • How will you develop your ideas to achieve the artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall what video game music is and how the music elements are used
  • Be able to use DAW (Soundtrap) to create your own composition
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to compose creative ideas of video game music using DAW (Soundtrap)
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the fundamental knowledge of Video game music and will now be able to apply this and establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ are now exploring more advance skills to the basics of DAW (Soundtrap) and will now be able to start developing their skills.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion B – Developing Skills

i. Demonstrate learning and development of skills and techniques.
ii. Demonstrate using skills and techniques to create or perform music.

Criterion D – Responding

i. Identify connections between the music, its context and your prior learning.
ii. Recognise what inspires or influences music.
iii. Evaluate certain principles/elements of music.

Establishing links between all modules studied so far to develop performance skills

Module 6 - Axis of Awesome

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The “4-chord-trick” allows artists and songwriters to communicate their own personal identity and cultural expression. Axis of Awesome allows students to learn 4 chords and arrange songs that they choose and identify with and be able to self-manage and reflect during their rehearsals and final performance.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the Axis of Awesome?
  • What is the “4-chord-song” trick?
  • What is a major and minor chord?
  • How do you play the fundamental chords on the keyboard, guitar, ukulele, bass?
  • How do you play the fundamental rhythmic patterns on the drum kit?
  • What self-management/personable skills do you need for rehearsal?
  • What performance skills do you need for a live performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to listen to songs and identify the elements confidently (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to read instrument chord charts and display them practically
  • To be able to play the fundamental chord patterns (Major and Minor chords)
  • Be able to work as a band/team and self-manage with rehearsal plans
  • Be able to give regular feedback (self and peer)
  • Be able to perform in front of an audience

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice
  • Criterion B – Develop skills on their chosen instrument, logging their progress and setting targets to develop further.
  • Criterion C – Performing a song of their choice using the “”4-chord trick””
  • Criterion D – Reflecting on their final performance and progress

Exploring Music Elements and Appraising (Dr. Smith)

Module 1 - Music Forms and Devices

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the Elements of Music have been communicated and interpreted by musicians leads to the many and varied genres of global music showing differences in personal and cultural expression.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the Elements of Music? (DR SMITH)
  • What Elements of Music allow us to communicate across various genres?
  • What different stimuli do composers use when creating and composing music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

Be able to identify the music elements (DR SMITH) Be able to describe most of DR SMITH in a piece Be able to explain composer’s intentions for choosing those music elements Be able to reflect on the music skills in listening/appraising, performing, composing Be able to explain the importance of the elements in music when composing for a narrative Be able to create a compositional plan in the effort to create a piece.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

In Year 7 and 8, students would have been exposed to the elements of music. This module will enable students to recall this. The starting point of our curriculum is The Music Elements (DR SMITH) Considered to be one most important foundations of any piece of music. It is believed that a person cannot compose music without including these into their piece. Secondly, they enable us to describe what you can hear, analyse what the composers are and communicate our thoughts and findings, using the common and universal language of music.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of unit assessment.
Students will also carry out a comprehension task (using DR SMITH)

Criterion C – Students will think creatively by organising ideas to compose a piece of music.

  • What initial ideas do you have for your performance/composition?
  • How have you used the knowledge of the musical elements to help you think creatively?
  • Why will these ideas lead to a successful outcome?

Exploring music genres and wider social/historical contexts to build cultural capital on our students’ world around them

Module 2 - Blues

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Blues music grew from a need to express personal and cultural expression and to create an identity through perspectives of suffering, establishing musical structures.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Blues from?
  • What is the purpose and context of Blues music?
  • What is the Blues scale?
  • What is the 12 Bar Blues?
  • What is improvisation and syncopation?
  • What is a chord sequence?
  • What is a bassline? What is a triad?
  • What is in a Maj7 chord a min7 chord?
  • What music artists are associated with Blues music?
  • What are the musical elements of Blues music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise the use of the Blues Scale
  • Be able to describe accurately a chord sequence and the 12 Bar Blues
  • Be able to perform the 12 Bar Blues on the keyboard, guitar or ukulele
  • Be able to create an arrangement of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • How to improvise using the blues scale

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the elements of music. They will be able to establish links between instruments of the orchestra and of the Blues, permitting a reflection on innovation within the genre. The students’ ability to read pitch, rhythm on instruments will give them the tools needed to read and create music as to how to critically assess their and their peers’ work using correct terminology.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of module assessment.
  • Criterion B – Developing skills on piano /tuned instruments.
    Performance of arranged/composed piece in ensemble
  • Criterion D – Responding to the piece you have arranged/composed
Module 3 - Protest Music

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Protest music grew from a community in need for change and express personal and cultural expression and to create an identity through established musical structures.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a protest song?
  • What are protest songs usually about?
  • Why do we have protest songs?
  • Why do you think some protest songs are catchy?
  • What are the common types of pop structures?
  • What are the common types of pop chord sequences?
  • How do you create protest lyrics?
  • How can you use DAW to create a backing track?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recognise a protest song
  • Be able to describe the music elements in different types of protest songs
  • Be able to perform protest songs independently and in small groups
  • Be able to create lyrics of a given piece and perform as an ensemble
  • Be able to understand different types of chord progressions to develop songs
  • Be able to compose your own protest song, introducing a music digital software.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the Blues music. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of protest music overtime. The students’ ability to understand chords, chord progressions, performing and composing music will support their learning.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice at the start of each lesson as well as a final end of module assessment.
  • Criterion B – Developing skills on keyboard, guitar and ukulele
    Performance of arranged/composed piece in ensemble
  • Criterion C – Thinking creatively, Students will develop their skills through ideas

MYP Common Assessment – Composition Project

Module 4 - Using a DAW: Dance Music 1

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The identity of a modern song relies on effective composition and effective music created using digital technology showing scientific and technical innovation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a DAW/synthesizer?
  • What is delay and reverb?
  • What is distortion?
  • What is a drop?
  • What is a riser?
  • What is a sequencer?
  • What is a 4/4 Kick?
  • What are the defining traits of electronic music?
  • How did technology advancements influence the development of music?
  • What are the contexts and purposes of dance music styles?
  • What instruments are used within dance music styles?
  • What has influenced and inspired dance music styles?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to define and create a 4/4 beat
  • Be able to create a drum pattern with offbeat hats
  • Be able to identify and define the elements of music that different types of Dance music uses
  • Be able to create and identify a drop/riser
  • Be able to recognise the use of BPM in different genres (E.g 140bpm in Grime)
  • Be able to use the knowledge you have gained to make your creative decisions
  • Be able to give an overall intention for the music you are creating
  • Be able to explain how you will use the features found in the music
  • Be able to justify what has inspired your creative decisions

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about music elements of popular music through protest songs. They will be able to establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ would have been introduced to DAW’s and will now be able to develop their skills.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Knowing and Understanding

i. Demonstrate knowledge of the music. (Ai)
ii. Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the music. (Aii)
iii. Use knowledge to inform your musical choices. (Aiii)

Criterion C – Thinking Creatively

i. Outline a clear and achievable artistic intention (Ci)
ii. Outline alternatives, perspectives, and imaginative solutions (Cii)
iii. Demonstrate exploration of ideas to a finish product (Ciii)

Module 5 - Using a DAW: Dance Music 2

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The identity of a modern song relies on effective composition and effective music created using digital technology showing scientific and technical innovation.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own DAW Dance music?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?
  • How will you develop your ideas to achieve the artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall what the dance music genres are and the similarities and contrasts of the music elements and how they are used
  • Be able to use DAW (Soundtrap) to create your own composition
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to compose creative ideas of dance music using DAW (Soundtrap)
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the fundamental knowledge of Dance music and will now be able to apply this and establish links between the context and the music elements, permitting a reflection on development of technology overtime. The students’ are now developing more advance skills of DAW (Soundtrap) and will now be able to start fine-tuning their skills.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion B – Developing Skills

i. Demonstrate learning and development of skills and techniques. (Bi)
ii. Demonstrate using skills and techniques to create or perform music. (Bii)

Criterion D – Responding

i. Outline connections and transfer learning to new settings (Di)
ii. Create an artistic response inspired by the world around them. (Dii)
iii. Evaluate the artwork of self and others. (Diii)

Establishing links between all modules studied so far to develop performance skills

Module 6 - In at the Deep End

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The genre, a popular song, allows artists and songwriters to communicate their own personal identity and cultural expression. In at the Deep End allows students to learn music that they choose, like and identify with and be able to self-manage and reflect during their rehearsals and final performance.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What makes a good song?
  • How do you play the fundamental chords on the keyboard, guitar, ukulele, bass?
  • How do you play the fundamental rhythmic patterns on the drum kit?
  • What self-management/personable skills do you need for rehearsal?
  • What performance skills do you need for a live performance?
  • In what ways can the Elements of Music be refined or manipulated to create new arrangements of an existing song or piece of music?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to listen to songs and identify the elements confidently (DR SMITH)
  • Be able to read instrument chord charts and display them practically
  • To be able to play the fundamental chord patterns (Major and Minor chords)
  • Be able to work as a band/team and self-manage with rehearsal plans
  • Be able to give regular feedback (self and peer)
  • Be able to perform in front of an audience

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about music elements of popular and world music and should now be confident with a particular instrument that they can develop further in this unit. They will be able to establish links between all modules studied so far to develop their own performance of a song of their choice, permitting a reflection of self-management skills and team work.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criterion A – Frequent knowledge quizzes/DR SMITH practice
  • Criterion B – Develop skills on their chosen instrument, logging their progress and setting targets to develop further.
  • Criterion C – Performing a song of their choice
  • Criterion D – Reflecting on their final performance and progress