KS3 History

In an increasingly complex world, students should be aware of how they have been shaped. We are shaped by our pasts, learning from others’ experiences.  We are shaped by our location and how society has developed.  We are shaped by our planet. We are shaped by our beliefs and ideas.

Subjects in Individuals and Societies follow sequences of lessons that, through repeated exposure and clear linking, ensure students are able to retain key declarative knowledge and abstract concepts such as monarchy and location. They embed and develop the key procedural skills of the discipline, allowing them to analyse, explain, describe and critically assess.

History is structured in a broadly chronological order and lessons highlight key concepts such as change, continuity, power and conflict. These abstracts are returned to in different settings in order that students can articulate the subjects’ core concepts and topic specific knowledge.

Module 1 - Unit 1: Egypt & Greece

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Culture

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is an inference?
  • What is chronology?
  • What is the difference between AD, BC, CE and BCE?
  • What makes a source reliable?
  • What is the difference between primary and secondary sources?
  • Why was the Nile so important to Egypt?
  • Why did Egyptian art look ‘wrong’?
  • How did rulers represent themselves?
  • What happened during the process of mummification?
  • How do people remember Ramesses II?
  • Were there any obvious similarities between Egyptian and Greek religious practise?
  • What were the characteristics of key Greek gods?
  • What were the events of, and purpose of, Greek sacrifice?
  • What were the characteristics of Greek heroes?
  • What were the two halves of Odysseus’ character?
  • What was the nature of Greek theatre and how important was competition?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to make an inference.
  • Be able to arrange events and dates from the Classical World in chronological order.
  • Be able to begin to investigate and evaluate the reliability of sources.
  • Be able to describe events and give one supporting detail.
  • Be able to identify similarities and differences in sources following investigation.
  • Be able to begin to form a justified judgement.
Module 2 - Unit 2: Rome

Key Concepts

Change

ATLs

Communication skills

Related Concepts

Civilisation

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Egyptian and Greek beliefs about religion.
  • Mythology in Greek culture – Odysseus and the Greek hero
  • How the Greeks entertained themselves (theatre vs. gladiators).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How did the Romans believe the city of Rome was founded?
  • Who was Rhea Silvia?
  • Who were Romulus and Remus?
  • How large was the Roman Empire?
  • When did Britain become part of the Roman Empire?
  • What was life like at Hadrian’s Wall?
  • What were the different types of Gladiators?
  • Where was the amphitheatre in London and what happened there?
  • How important was Bathing to Roman Society?
  • What was Roman Colchester like?
  • How did the Romans worship?
  • How did the Romans change Britain?
  • Why did the Roman empire collapse?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Write a narrative account about the Foundation of Rome
  • Infer from classical sources about life in the north of the Province of Britannia, including supporting detail.
  • Be able to write an explanation essay and begin to give a clear judgement about how far we can understand what life was like in a Roman town
  • Clearly identify two key features of Roman religious worship and give supporting details.
  • Be able to begin to make a judgement on how far the Romans changed Britain.
  • Write a narrative account about the collapse of the Roman empire.
Module 3 - Unit 3: Islam in the Middle East

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Thinking skills

Related Concepts

Conflict

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The difference between poly and monotheistic religions.
  • How did cultural beliefs affect Egyptian art?
  • The importance of Rome in the empire.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who was Muhammed?
  • How did Islam initially spread?
  • Why was Baghdad such an important cultural site?
  • How did Muslim artists celebrate their faith?
  • Why are there restrictions on Muslim art?
  • Why was Jerusalem such an important city for Muslims, Jews and Christians?
  • Who was Pope Urban and why did he launch the Crusades?
  • Why did people go on Crusade?
  • What was the impact of the Crusades on Europe?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Identify key features in the life of Muhammed and the spread of Islam.
  • Identify differences between Egyptian and Islamic Art.
  • Analyse sources from Pope Urban using one element of PANDA.
  • Write a judgement essay about the reasons why people went on Crusade.
  • Write an explanation essay about the impact of the Crusades on Europe.
Module 4 - Unit 4: Medieval Africa

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Civilisation

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Comparison with the administrative capabilities of Rome.
  • Comparison with Egyptian Royalty – Cleopatra and Ramesses II.
  • Comparison with the religions of Greece, Egypt, Rome and Islam.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is Africa?
  • What was the Scramble for Africa?
  • How did European historians view Africa?
  • Who was King Tenkamenin of Ghana?
  • What was Great Zimbabwe like?
  • How did the Administration of Mali function?
  • How important were the royals of Benin?
  • What was unique about the religion in Ethiopia?
  • How civilised was pre-colonial Africa?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Identify the location of Africa.
  • Critically analyse the opinions of European historians using one element of PANDA.
  • Write an essay that gives a judgement about the level of civilisation in Africa.
  • Use primary sources to analyse the countries of Ghana, Zimbabwe, Mali, Benin and Ethiopia.
Module 5 - Unit 5: Medieval England I

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Comparison with King Tenkamenin of Ghana, Cleopatra and Ramesses.
  • Comparison with Greek theatres, Roman baths: how civilised was England?
  • Comparison of the way Jewish people were treated with the way the Christians treated Muslims in the Middle East.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was England like in 1066?
  • Who was in line to succeed Edward the Confessor?
  • Who won the Battle of Fulford Bridge?
  • How did William win the Battle of Hastings?
  • What problems faced William when he became king and how did he solve them?
  • What was it like to live in a village?
  • What was Medieval England like for women?
  • How were Jewish people treated in Medieval England?
  • What was it like to live in a town?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Begin to analyse interpretations of history concerning the succession to Edward’s throne.
  • Analyse different factors and form a judgement about why William won the Battle of Hastings.
  • Use sources to determine what life was like for women and Jewish people in Medieval England.
  • Identify key features of town and village life.
Module 6 - Unit 6: Medieval England II

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What did Henry II mean when he asked to be rid of ‘this turbulent priest’?
  • How did the Black Death kill people?
  • What cures did people try?
  • Why did the Peasants revolt against their king?
  • What was the Renaissance?
  • Why did Martin Luther protest?
  • Why did Henry VIII have so many problems?
  • Why did Henry VIII Break from Rome?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Identify key features and give supporting details in the death of Thomas Becket.
  • Write an explanation essay about the impact of the Black Death.
  • Analyse sources to determine the causes of the Peasant’s Revolt.
  • Write a judgement essay about the most important reason that Henry broke from Rome.
Module 1 - Unit 1: Reformation & Elizabeth I

Key Concepts

Change

ATLs

Communication skills

Related Concepts

Causality

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The religion in England before Henry VIII.
  • Henry’s Divorce from Katherine of Aragon.
  • Henry’s marriage to Anne Boleyn and conversion to Protestantism.
  • Henry’s role as Head of the Church in England.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What changes did Edward make to the English church and why?
  • What were the plans for his succession.
  • What did Mary do to the church as queen and how did she deal with English Protestants?
  • Why was Mary’s marriage to Philip so unpopular?
  • How is Mary remembered?
  • What problems did Elizabeth face in her childhood?
  • What was Elizabeth’s relationship with her siblings like?
  • What was Elizabeth’s religious settlement?
  • What objections did the Puritans and Catholics have to the settlement?
  • Why did Elizabeth execute Mary Queen of Scots?
  • What were the causes of the Spanish Armada and the reasons for its failure?
  • What factors that drove early exploration and what were the attitudes of the explorers?
  • How did Elizabeth portray herself in art?
  • Why was James VI / I able to become king of England?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to investigate and analyse sources.
  • Be able to infer from sources.
  • Be able to describe and give one precise piece of supporting detail.
  • Be able to read texts for key pieces of information.
  • Be able to write a narrative account.
  • Be able to begin using PANDA to investigate sources.
  • Be able to write an explanation essay with three paragraphs, each containing a precise detail.
  • Be able to write with clarity and organise ideas clearly.
  • Be able to begin assessing interpretations.
Module 2 - Unit 2: The Stuarts

Key Concepts

Systems

ATLs

Self-management skills

Related Concepts

Governance

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Explicit links to the nature of Puritanism and the lingering Catholicism in England.
  • The impact of autocracy on the country – see. Henry VIII and the Break with Rome.
  • How was Bloody Mary remembered? Is that fair?
  • Use of PANDA in the success of Mary lesson.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why did Charles I fall out with Parliament?
  • What was the Divine Right of Kings?
  • How did Parliament reform the army during the Civil War?
  • Who was Oliver Cromwell and what was the New Model Army?
  • How far did Prince Rupert help the royalist cause?
  • What was Charles accused of and what happened to him?
  • Why do people accuse Cromwell of being a war criminal?
  • Is Cromwell appropriately remembered in Britain?
  • What was Restoration England like?
  • Was Charles II a Merry Monarch?
  • What was it like to live through the Great Plague and how effective were the actions of the government?
  • What was the impact of the Great Fire of London?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to form a coherent judgement on the reasons why Parliament and Charles fell out.
  • Be able to compare the benefits of autocracy with the benefits of parliamentary rule.
  • Be able to identify the change and consequence of Parliament’s military reforms.
  • Be able to use source analysis to form a judgement on the role of Rupert.
  • Be able to weigh up the evidence about Cromwell to form a judgement.
  • Be able to analyse pictorial sources to form a judgement about Restoration England and Charles II
  • Use PANDA to form a judgement on the impact of the Plague on London
  • Write a clear narrative account of the Great Fire of London.
Module 3 - Unit 3: Slavery

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Social skills

Related Concepts

Governance

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Links to the slavery of Ancient Rome.
  • Links to the importance of crops in Egypt and Medieval England.
  • Links to English competition with France and Spain, especially as a Protestant country.
  • Link to the statue of Cromwell at Parliament.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why did Britain have colonies in America?
  • Which countries was Britain in competition with?
  • How were tobacco and cotton grown and why were they suited to slave labour?
  • How were people enslaved?
  • What happened during the Middle Passage?
  • What was a slave worth and how were they sold?
  • How did slaves adapt?
  • What were the punishments for resisting the planters?
  • How did Britain profit from the Slave Trade?
  • What happened in Haiti, Hispaniola, Brazil and the Congo?
  • How did American Independence affect the campaign for abolition?
  • What is the case for paying reparations?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to state key features of slavery.
  • Be able to write a narrative account about how the Atlantic Slave Trade began.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of written sources about the Middle Passage using PANDA.
  • Be able to write an essay that explains the Trade Triangle.
  • Be able to make inferences about conditions on Slave Ships from visual and written sources.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of sources about life on Plantations.
  • Be able to make a judgement about who benefitted the most from the Slave Trade.
  • Understand the global nature of the slave trade by looking at examples in other countries.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of how slavery was abolished.
  • Be able to explain the arguments made for paying reparations.
Module 4 - Unit 4: The Industrial Revolution

Key Concepts

Change

ATLs

Thinking skills

Related Concepts

Innovation and revolution

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Life in Medieval Towns and Villages.
  • The spread of the plague in medieval towns.
  • The impact of the Renaissance on education.
  • How successful was Charles I as king?

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How did the landscape of Britain change 1750 -1900?
  • What was it like to work in a mill?
  • Why did the population of Britain increase during the Industrial Revolution?
  • How did the Industrial Revolution affect industry, agriculture, iron and coal production?
  • What improvements did the growth of the Railways network bring?
  • What can Charles Booth’s map tell us about what life was like for the urban poor?
  • Why is there such confusion over the identity of Jack the Ripper and why are the murders so famous?
  • What was it like to work in a mine?
  • How successful an engineer and businessman was Brunel?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explain the consequences of Industrial Revolution on the British landscape.
  • Be able to state key features of working in a mill.
  • Be able to make an inference from a written source about the concerns of the mill owners.
  • Be able to explain why the population of Britain grew during the Industrial Revolution.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of how the railways created jobs.
  • Be able to make inferences about the level of poverty in London from Booth’s map.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of Booth’s map using PANDA.
  • Be able to form a judgement about the likley identity of Jack the Ripper.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of sources that discuss the conditions faced by miners using PANDA.
Module 5 - Unit 5: World War One I

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • European attitudes to West African civilisation.
  • European attitudes to Africans and slavery.
  • Attitudes of royalty and imperialism (Henry VIII, Charles I).
  • Impact of technological advances in war (New Model Army, Ironsides).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was the Scramble for Africa and why did it happen?
  • Why was Franz Ferdinand assassinated?
  • What were the MAIN causes of World War One?
  • Why did Britain go to war to defend Belgium?
  • What were the French and German battle plans?
  • How did the war become one of attrition?
  • How did Britain try to recruit men into the army?
  • Why was conscription introduced?
  • What was the impact of the tank, the plane, the submarine and the creeping barrage?
  • How were wounded men dealt with?
  • What advances did Gillies make?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to make an inference about the importance of Africa to the European powers.
  • Be able to identify two key features of Franz Ferdinand’s assassination.
  • Be able to write an essay that explains the MAIN causes of WWI.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of Britain’s declaration of war in 1914.
  • Be able to identify the key features of Plan 17 and the Schlieffen Plan.
  • Be able to make inferences about what life was like in the trenches.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of recruitment posters.
  • Be able to identify the key features of each technological advance.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of Gillies’ photographs.
Module 6 - Unit 6: World War One II

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The role of Prince Rupert in the Civil War.
  • Comparison of Cromwell’s destruction of Irish crops and the U-boat blockade.
  • Life as a Roman and Medieval woman.
  • Elizabeth’s decision not to marry.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • European attitudes to West African civilisation.
  • European attitudes to Africans and slavery.
  • Attitudes of royalty and imperialism (Henry VIII, Charles I).
  • Impact of technological advances in war (New Model Army, Ironsides).

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to write a narrative account of the events of 1917.
  • Be able to identfy the key features of heroic actions in World War One.
  • Be able to plan how to find more information about heroic actions.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of a source for understanding the impact of the U-Boat blockade on Britain.
  • Be able to identify the key features of the Suffragettes and the Suffragists.
  • Be able to plan how to find more information about the role of women in World War One.
  • Be able to write a narrative account about the impact of World War One on the suffrage campaign.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining the main terms of the Treaty of Versailles.
Module 1 - Unit 1: The Holocaust I

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Social skills

Related Concepts

Conflict

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Primary and Secondary sourcework.
  • The attitudes of one group of people to another.
  • The religious disputes between Protestants and Catholics.
  • The basic tenets of Judaism as taught in RE.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was the impact of World War One on Germany and France especially?
  • Why did the French want revenge on Germany?
  • What was the reaction of the German people to the peace terms?
  • What was the effect of the simple messaging and anti-Semitism of the NSDAP?
  • Who were the the perpetrators of the Holocaust?
  • What is the history of Christian anti-Semitism?
  • Why were Jewish people used as scapegoats?
  • How did life for Jewish people became progressively worse under Hitler’s government before World War Two?
  • Why could many Jewish people simply not leave Germany?
  • What happened to disabled people under the NSDAP regime?
  • How did people deal with the terrible moral dilemmas when confronting the reality of anti-Semitism?
  • Why did the Germans construct Ghettoes in Poland?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to investigate and infer from sources.
  • Be able to write a clear explain essay with three paragraphs, each containing a precise detail and that links directly to the question.
  • Be able to work with multiple sources to build up an accurate picture of the past.
  • Be able to write a narrative account that is in chronological order and explains how events in history are linked.
Module 2 - Unit 2: The Holocaust II

Key Concepts

Global Interactions

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Conflict

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The Nuremberg Laws and events of Kristallnacht
  • The role of the SS in NSDAP society.
  • NSDAP views on Untermenschen, the example of the treatment of disabled people, belief in the Aryan race.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What restrictive measures did Jewish people suffer under NSDAP rule?
  • What options were available for Jewish people to resist and how successful was this resistance?
  • What was the Wannsee Conference and what decisions were made there?
  • What happened to Jewish people at Auschwitz?
  • Who was responsible for Holocaust?
  • How far can other parties be blamed for the Holocaust (occupied countries, the Allies, inability of Jewish people to emigrate)?
  • How is the Holocaust remembered?
  • What can personal accounts tell us about the Holocaust?
  • Why and how was the state of Israel founded?
  • What was the impact of NSDAP violence on Homosexuals and Gypsies during the Holocaust?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand why Holocaust historiography changes.
  • Be able to understand where they could find more information about the Holocaust
  • Be able to make a judgement about how successfully Jewish people resisted.
  • Be able to make an inference about the purpose of the Final Solution.
  • Be able to understand where they could find more information about Auschwitz.
  • Be able to consider multiple points of view and come to a judgement about who is most responsible for the Holocaust.
  • Be able to use PANDA to form a judgement about the usefulness of If This is a Man.
  • Be able to write a narrative account about the foundation of Israel.
  • Be able to make an inference about NSDAP attitudes to Gypsies.
  • Be able to understand where they could find more information about the persecution of Homosexuals.
Module 3 - Unit 3: Civil Rights in America I

Key Concepts

Systems

ATLs

Communication skills

Related Concepts

Innovation and revolution

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Slavery in the British Empire.
  • Dehumanisation and discrimination against the Jewish people in Germany.
  • The causes of the English Civil War.
  • Britain’s World War One recruitment campaign.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why were slaves important to the American economy after independence?
  • Was the Civil War fought to free the slaves?
  • How were African Americans treated after the Civil War?
  • What was Reconstruction?
  • What did the members of the KKK want?
  • What was the significance of Plessy vs. Ferguson and what was life like under Jim Crow?
  • How successful was the NAACP’s campaign of Peaceful Protest?
  • What impact did Martin Luther King have with Direct Action?
  • How significant was Brown vs. Board of Education and how committed was Eisenhower to desegregation?
  • Who was Emmett Till and how did he die?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to write a narrative account of the United States’ history from Independence to c.1850.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of sources that discuss the abolition of slavery in the UK.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining the Civil War started.
  • Be able state key features about the Civil War, KKK and Reconstruction.
  • Be able to make inferences from pictorial sources about the impact of Jim Crow.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of the work of the NAACP and peaceful protest.
  • Be able to write a judgement question assessing the efficacy of MLK’s direct action.
  • Be able to understand how they could find more information out about Eisenhower’s attitude to desegregation.
  • Be able to make inferences about the death of Emmett Till.
Module 4 - Unit 4: Civil Rights in America II

Key Concepts

Systems

ATLs

Research skills

Related Concepts

Innovation and revolution

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Comparison with the NSDAP police state.
  • Migration of Romans and Normans to Britain.
  • Slavery and race relations within the British Empire.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What were the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Act designed to acheive?
  • How did the police treat African Americans?
  • Why was lynching tolerated?
  • Were African Americans more likely to be incacerated than their white peers?
  • How successful have the responses to the death of Eric Garner and George Floyd been?
  • Does the election of Trump and then Biden support MLK’s ‘the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice’?
  • Who migrated to Britain after World War Two?
  • Who were the passengers of the Empire Windrush and what were they looking for?
  • What was the impact of the Empire Windrush on Britain?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to make inferences about the reasons for the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Act.
  • Be able to state the differences between two interpretations looking at police treatment of African Americans.
  • Be able to make a judgement about the success of the BLM movement.
  • Be able to state key features about the presidencies of Obama and Trump.
  • Be able to make inferences about why people migrated to Britain after World War Two.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining the impact of the Empire Windrush on Britain.
Module 5 - Unit 5: End of Empire

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • Oliver Cromwell in Ireland.
  • British involvement in World War One.
  • The origins of the British Empire – Roanoke, Trade, Prestige

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Why did the English conquer Ireland?
  • What did the British do to relieve the Irish Famine?
  • Why did the Irish rebel over British rule in 1916?
  • Why was the island of Ireland split in 1921?
  • What were both sides attempting to achieve during the Troubles?
  • Was Bloody Sunday (1972) a war crime?
  • Was the IRA right to commit the Brighton Hotel bombing (1984)?
  • Why was India the Jewel in the Crown?
  • What contributions did Indians make to the British war effort in World War Two?
  • Why did so many people die during Partition?
  • Why did India help East Pakistan secede?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to write a narrative account of the English involvement in Ireland until 1900.
  • Be able to assess the usefulness of a source for explaining the causes of the Easter Rising.
  • Be able to understand how they could try to find more information out about the causes of the Troubles.
  • Be able to write a concise judgement paragraph about the actions of the British on Bloody Sunday.
  • Be able to identify the key features of the Good Friday Agreement.
  • Be able to identify relevant information to explain why Britain was involved in India.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of the role of India in World War Two.
  • Be able to write an essay explaining why so many people died during Partition.
  • Be able to state the differences between interpretations of the Indian involvement in East Pakistan.
Module 6 - Unit 6: Protest

Key Concepts

TBC

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

  • The treatment of women in the medieval period.
  • (RE) Attitudes to women in marriage, attitudes to contraception and the sanctity of life.
  • The destruction caused by the Holocaust and World War Two.
  • British colonial influence in India, Ireland receding.
  • The use of media to abolish slavery in UK.
  • The use of media in the BLM movement.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What was Second Wave feminism?
  • What impact did the Feminine Mystique have?
  • Why did women have to fight for equal pay and access to abortion?
  • Why was the European Union formed and why did Britain join?
  • What benefits did the European Membership give Britons?
  • Who were the Eurosceptics?
  • How was the migration debate portrayed in the media?
  • Should Britain rejoin the European Union?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to state the key features of Second Wave Feminism.
  • Be able to state differences on the role of women in the mid-Twentieth century.
  • Be able to make inferences from sources about the Equal Pay Act and people’s attitude to Abortion.
  • Be able to write a narrative account of the European Union in the Twentieth Century.
  • Be able to identify relevant material about migration to Britain.
  • Be able to use sources to make inferences about the British attitudes to migration.
  • Be able to write a judgement essay on the possibility of Britain re-joining the European Union.