KS3 Geography

In an increasingly complex world, students should be aware of how they have been shaped. We are shaped by our pasts, learning from others’ experiences. We are shaped by our location and how society has developed. We are shaped by our planet. We are shaped by our beliefs and ideas.

Subjects in Individuals and Societies follow sequences of lessons that, through repeated exposure and clear linking, ensure students are able to retain key declarative knowledge and abstract concepts such as monarchy and location. They embed and develop the key procedural skills of the discipline, allowing them to analyse, explain, describe and critically assess.

In Geography we seek to highlight the importance not only of learning well-sequenced geographical content, but of learning geography as a discipline. We ensure that students learn about the purposes of geography, how geographers think, about the methods geographers use to create valuable insights about the world and the range of ideas and perspectives that make geography a truly global subject.

Module 1 - An Introduction to Geography

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

People’s place in the world can be described using patterns and trends at different scales.

Links to prior learning

Students will build on previous knowledge from primary school, regarding human and physical geography. Students will also build on world knowledge (Continents and Oceans). Consolidating knowledge of local area/UK and learning about the Physical geography of it.

Link to assessment

A and C

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

Differentiating Continents and Oceans on a map/Understanding longitude and latitude (and the differences).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is physical geography?
  • What is human geography?
  • What is environmental geography?
  • What are the continents and Oceans of the World?
  • What is the physical geography of the UK?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use an atlas skills to find the world’s oceans and continents.
  • Define and use key words such as: Human and Physical
  • Use an atlas skills to find out about the physical geography of the UK.
Module 2 - Location, Location, Location

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

People’s place in the world can be described using patterns and trends at different scales.

Links to prior learning

Students will apply basic map skills introduced in module 1, within module 2 when looking at OS maps, contour lines and grid referencing. They will develop and build their scientific investigation skills during a local fieldwork investigation.

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

Students are still finding 6 figure references an issue/ Understanding the Tees Exe line.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a grid reference?
  • Why are 6 figure grid references more accurate than 4 figure references?
  • How can I read contour lines?
  • How can I represent relief on a map?
  • How can I Interpret OS maps of my local area?
  • What is Google Earth used for?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Find a 4 figure and 6 figure grid reference
  • Interpret contour lines on an OS map
  • Interpret an OS map of the local area
  • Use fieldwork skills to conduct a study of the local area.
Module 3 - Population

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Population structures produce specific patterns and trends due to fairness, development and cultural change.

Links to prior learning

Students to continue developing their knowledge of space and place ( with Atlas skills) by linking their knowledge with the current topic (module 1/2). Students are further development their inquiry and critical thinking skills (developed in Module 2) by analysing sources.

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

 

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • How can we define ‘population’?
  • What is an ‘aging population’?
  • What is population density? (UK cities)
  • What causes population to change? (LICs VS HICS)
  • How do we measure population structure? (UK vs Kenya)
  • What changes will development make to the population?
  • What is a push and pull factor?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Defining population and looking at patterns of where populations live
  • Analysis of population pyramids and using skills to develop an understanding of them
  • Looking at historic population patterns and understanding how different factors change them
  • Links to OS map skills for UK.
Module 4 - Tourism

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Tourism is an important cultural industry which celebrates diversity through personal and cultural expression.

Links to prior learning

Students continue to develop understanding of space and place through location studies. Students to grow in their understanding of culture and diversity, linking to Module 1 (diversity in London).

Link to assessment

A, B and C

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is tourism?
  • What is tourism like in the UK?
  • Fieldwork project
  • Why is tourism important for the economy?
  • What is tourism like in Spain Vs Haiti?
  • What is ecotourism?
  • Why is ecotourism important in Kenya?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Students continue to develop their understanding of place using atlas and map skills to describe various local and global locations
  • Development of knowledge of diversity and culture through different case studies
  • Development of critical thinking skills to analyse sources.
Module 5 - Ecosystems and Biomes

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Ecosystems are processes that produce relationships which should be developed and maintained through fairness and development.

Links to prior learning

Students are further developing their interpretation and inquiry skills (fieldwork study) from module 2, within module 4 when investigating ecosytems. Students also learn to develop their empathy as learners, when looking at and developing their knowledge of the rainforest.

Link to assessment

A, B and C

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is an ecosystem?
  • What is a foodchain/ food web?
  • What are global ecosystems?
  • What is the structure of rainforest?
  • What are the components of the rainforest? (climate/soils/plants+animals)
  • What is the nutrient cycle?
  • What are the threats to the rainforest?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Interpret food chains and food webs
  • Annotate the rainforest structure
  • Recall the components of a rainforest
  • Recall the threats to the rainforest
  • Develop essay writing skills.
Module 6 - Rock on! Physical Landscapes of the UK

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

 

Links to prior learning

 

Link to assessment

 

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

 

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  •  

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  •  

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The Physical geography of the UK is governed by systems and processes which can be monitored through scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will begin to build upon their knowledge of the UK, learning about different landscapes. They will use OS map skills to be able to map out and understand relief in certain areas of the UK.

Link to assessment

A and C

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

 

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a landscape?
  • Why are landscapes important?
  • What is an urban landscape?
  • What are landscape processes?
  • How can I define coastal/River/ mountainous landscapes?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Continue to use OS map skills to understand different types of environments
  • Understanding the rock cycle and how this has impacted the formation of the world
  • Investigating different landscapes including: coastal, River and mountainous.
Module 1 - Tectonic Hazard Processes

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Individuals understand the process which leads to hazards creating change, which is controlled through scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will build on prior knowledge of continents and oceans to be able to establish which are oceanic and continental crust/plates.

Link to assessment

A and C

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

Students are unsure of how tectonic plates move. Students can not recall the different types of plates correctly.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the structure of the earth?
  • What is the historic evidence for Plate tectonics (Wegener and Hess)
  • What are the different plate boundaries?
  • How do tectonic plates move?
  • What are the different hazards formed at plate boundaries?
  • What is the distribution and formation of volcanoes and earthquakes?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Recall the layers of the earth from inside to out (and vice versa), 2 types of crust (oceanic and continental), learn the names of at least 7 of the tectonic plates and be able to locate them on a map.
  • Recall the 4 types of plate boundaries and what happens at each type of boundary. Describe and explain how plates move.
Module 2 - Tectonic Hazard Management

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Individuals understand the process which leads to hazards creating change, which is controlled through scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will build on and develop map skills which they have used since Year 7, in modules 1-3 within module 1 year 8 in regards to distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes.

Link to assessment

A,B, C and D

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

Students can not explain in detail specific case study elements (Eg: Social effects of the Nepalese earthquake).

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is it like living with hazard risk?
  • How can we reduce the risk of hazards?
  • How can we manage hazard risk (Volcanoes and earthquakes)?
  • How can I write a constructive essay?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Recall and draw plate margins/ recall the distribution of earthquakes and volcanoes on a map
  • Recall the effects of earthquakes and volcanoes.
  • Write a constructive essay.
Module 3 - Urbanisation

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The processes of development and migration have formed patterns and trends which are different according to identities and relationships.

Links to prior learning

Students will use map skills, acquired in year 7 within modules 1-3 to locate Brazil and the Favelas. They’re also using previously recalled knowledge of Brazil/the environment and crime.

Link to assessment

A, B and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  •  

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use an atlas to locate places with high and low urbanisation rates/ Define rural-urban migration
  • Recall the social and economic challenges faced in Rio
  • Recall ways to improve quality of life for LIC case study (Vs HIC case study).
Module 4 - A Study of Africa

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Cultures are developed and maintained through personal and cultural expressions, but changed through disparity and equity.

Links to prior learning

Students will apply basic map skills to locate physical features found in Africa. They should be able to name and identify all of the countries that we will study, along the Niles path. Students to continue to Use inquiry skills (developed from Year 7, Module 2) to analyse and develop understanding of issues faced by those living near the river.

Link to assessment

A and B

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the physical geography of Africa?
  • How is Africa perceived by the World?
  • What is the journey of the Nile from source to mouth?
  • Why is the Nile an important resource? (a study of Uganda, Ethiopia, Sudan and Egypt)

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use an atlas to locate and describe Africa
  • Recall physical features found in Africa
  • Learning about the journey of a river, and its characteristics
  • Developing understanding of different countries reliance on The Nile river.
Module 5 - Riveting Rivers

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

River systems and processes can be monitored using scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will build on prior knowledge of continents and oceans (development of atlas skills). Students to continue to develop knowledge of rivers and physical landscapes in the UK (Module 3 of Year 7).

Link to assessment

A, C and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the river erosion processes?
  • What are the river deposition processes?
  • What are the river Landforms?
  • Why are areas at risk of flooding? (case study).

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Recall River erosion processes
  • Recall river deposition processes
  • Recall and draw river landforms
  • Know the different river management strategies used.
Module 6 - Living off of the Earth's resources

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

The Management and intervention of earth’s resources and systems leads to a globalized, sustainable world.

Links to prior learning

Students to develop prior knowledge of sustainability from Module 2 of Year 7 and Module 4 of Year 8.

Link to assessment

A,B, C and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are natural resources?
  • How do we use the earth’s natural resources?
  • What is the structure of the earth’s atmosphere?
  • How can we be more sustainable as a planet?
  • What are the links to climate change?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Develop understanding of what a natural resource is/ Understanding the structure of earth’s atmosphere
  • Understanding how humans can use the earth’s resources more sustainably.
Module 1 - Wild, Wild Weather

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Individuals comprehend the causality of extreme weather systems, leading to scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will re-visit map skills, especially lines of latitude and how the temperature changes further away from the equator.

Link to assessment

A and B

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

Students are struggling to recall where tropical storms are located, and distributed.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the difference between weather and climate?
  • What is extreme weather?
  • What effects does extreme weather have on populations?
  • What is climate change?
  • What is the correlation between extreme weather and climate change?
  • Where are tropical storms distributed?
  • How do tropical storms form?
  • Typhoon Haiyan case study/ Storm Ciara 2020.

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Recall map skills (Year 7, Mod 1+2), climate zones and the factors which influence weather and climate (recap quiz)
  • Developing my research based skills, by looking at an extreme weather event case study.
Module 2 - Extreme Weather in the UK

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Individuals comprehend the causality of extreme weather sytems, leading to scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will re-visit map skills, especially lines of latitude and how the temperature changes further away from the equator.

Link to assessment

A and D

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

Students are struggling to recall the short term and long term responses of extreme weather hazards.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What extreme weather does the UK experience?
  • Why does the UK experience extreme weather?
  • Why is the UK’s weather so varied?
  • How does extreme weather affect the UK?
  • What is the atmospheric circulation model?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Recall map skills (Year 7, Mod 1+2)
  • Developing my research based skills, by looking at an extreme weather event case study.
Module 3 - The Developing World

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Fairness and development is formed and changed through power, patterns and trends.

Links to prior learning

Students will continue to develop their map skills, as well as place knowledge. They will use previous knowledge of continents and countries (especially in Africa) to locate trends and patterns in scales of development.

Link to assessment

B and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is development?
  • How do we define development?
  • How do we measure development?
  • What are the forms of aid?
  • Why do we use aid?
  • Is trade really fair? (fairtrade)
  • What is uneven development?
  • What are the causes of uneven development?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use map skills to identify countries in different stages of development.
  • Students should be able to use math skills to interpret graphs to compare countries using different development indicators.
  • Students should be able to effectively answer exam style questions in regards to development.
Module 4 - A Study of China

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Cultures are developed and maintained through personal and cultural expressions, but changed through disparity and equity.

Links to prior learning

Students will apply basic map skills to locate physical features found in China. They should be able to name and remember key geographical features such famous mountain ranges, rivers and cities in China. They should be able to recall what the 6 different climate zones are and describe the climate of China.

Link to assessment

A and C

Common misconceptions or errors following assessment?

 

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is China?
  • What are the physical and human characteristics of China?
  • How has China developed?
  • What are the causes, effects and solutions to air pollution?
  • How did China control population growth?
  • What is the North-South water transfer project?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use map skills (Year 7, Mod 1+2) to describe and locate China
  • Use GCSE graph analysis to identify patterns and trends
  • Recall key terms related to Urban environments (Year 8, Mod 4).
Module 5 - Cosy Coasts

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

Coastal systems and processes can be monitored using scientific and technical innovation.

Links to prior learning

Students will build on global/ scientific investigation skills acquired in Year 7 to learn about the different coastal processes and impacts of coastal management.

Link to assessment

A and C

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a coastline?
  • What are the erosional features of a coastline?
  • What are the different systems connected to coastline formation?
  • What is the relationship between coast and human populations?
  • is hard engineering better than soft engineering in preventing coastal erosion?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Recall what a coastline is
  • Recall and explain the different types of weathering and erosion (and how they occur)
  • Understand and explain the different coastal erosional and depositional landforms
  • Explain the difference between hard and soft engineering.
Module 6 - India and Mumbai

General Principle (Statement of Inquiry)

India is one of the most diverse and dynamic countries on the planet. We will look at how extreme disparities in wealth, diverse landscapes and rapidly developing societies are shaping India’s future.

Links to prior learning

Students will develop and build on map skills (module 1 and 2 of year 7), as well as confidently locating physical Characteristics and features (using previous skills built in year 7 module 3).Students will develop their understanding of development levels and what challenges and opportunities this creates for the people who live there. Students will also develop their understanding of megacities, using Mumbai as a case study.

Link to assessment

A, B, C and D

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Where is India located?
  • Why is the India an important global location?
  • What is the physical geography of India like?
  • Why are there huge disparities of wealth in India?
  • Why does India need a range of different strategies?
  • How has the megacity of Mumbai developed since 1990?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Use of map skills to develop knowledge of unknown areas and locations in the world
  • Developing the understanding what they physical geography of India is like, comparing it to other physical landscapes that students have previously known
  • Using inquiry skills to build and develop understanding of development in India and the history behind this.