KS3 Drama

Module 1 - Wonder

General Principal or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how physical drama skills can be communicated and interpreted by actors to lead to differences in personal and cultural expression.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the basic physical drama skills?
  • What is a tableau and freeze frame?
  • What are the effective skills that are needed for a tableau?
  • What is thought tracking?
  • What is cross-cutting and juxtaposition?
  • What is marking the moment?
  • How can a group create a performance?
  • How do you work as part of an ensemble?
  • How can these drama skills improve a performance?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the differences between a tableau and freeze frame
  • Be able to create tableau to be able to tell a story
  • Be able to use thought-tracking within your tableau to make it more effective
  • Understand how juxtaposition, cross-cutting and marking the moment is used in theatre and films
  • Be able to work in small groups to devise a short piece based on Wonder.
  • This should include the drama techniques – tableau, freeze frame, thought-tracking and marking the moment
  • Be able to recall the keywords used in physical drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on their work via self-assessment

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students may have limited experience of Drama. For some this may be the first time they have had a drama lesson taught by a subject specialist. There has been 6 weeks outlined in the unit planning however the first lesson will be based upon an introduction to drama which includes health safety, rules- rewards and sanctions to set high expectations from the beginning, as well as playing drama related games.

In Module 1 students will have their first opportunity to create small performances to slowly build up their confidence as well as develop their understanding of basic physical drama techniques.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Quizzes will be used throughout this module to recap on key information and to see if there are any gaps in knowledge.
  • Criteria C – Students will use their creative thinking skills to create a performance around the film/book “Wonder”.
Module 2 - Voice

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how vocal drama skills can be communicated and interpreted by actors to lead to differences in personal and cultural expression. Identities and emotions can be communicated through different styles.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the basic vocal drama skills?
  • What are the 5 p’s in voice? (Pitch, Pace, Pause, Projection & Personality?)
  • How to stretch your voice by understanding the 5 P’s of voice control?
  • How can you use the 5 P’s to change your voice and therefore create a new character?
  • How do actors use only their voices successfully to create characters?
  • How do you confidently create a character for a performance?
  • How do you work with a partner to perform a script confidently?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to have a basic understanding of voice terminology
  • Be able to convey an effective character by using just voice techniques
  • Be able to create an effective voice over from reading a script
  • Be able to create emotion with their voice using the 5 P’s to develop a character
  • Be able to understand some challenging terminology such as tone, pitch, pace and volume modulation, monotone.
  • Be able to recall the keywords used in vocal drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on their work via self-assessment

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students have had the opportunity to perform in front of their peers and have got experience of performing a character with the use of basic physical drama techniques. They will now flip this concept and use only their voice. The 5 P’s in vocal drama is important with spoken language and being able to communicate a range of emotions and situations.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Mini quizzes will be used to recap on key terminology. As well as an end of module assessment.
  • Criteria B – Developing their voice skills to create a character for their voice over in pairs and reflecting on their progress at the end of each lesson.
  • Criteria D – Responding to the final performance of their voice over
Module 3 - Greek Theatre

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how vocal and physical drama skills can be communicated and reflect theatre of the past to tell a story.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is Greek Theatre?
  • What is the origin of Greek Theatre?
  • What is the key terminology in Greek Theatre?
  • What are the differences between comedy and tragedy?
  • How do you effectively use body language to create a performance?
  • How do you create a story based on a Greek myth/legend?
  • How do you use your creative thinking skills when creating their performance?
  • How do you work with an ensemble to create confidently?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall a basic understanding of voice and physical drama terminology
  • Be able to convey a story by using voice and physical techniques
  • Be able to use vocal and physical skills to convey the story as a Greek chorus
  • Be able to understand some challenging terminology such as tone, pitch, pace and volume modulation, monotone.
  • Be able to recall the keywords used in vocal drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on students work via self-assessment

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

During Module 1 and 2 students were focusing on the basics of physical and vocal skills independently to strengthen those skills. Now they are expanding their knowledge and understanding of those skills by fusing those two drama skills together by creating a performance with the use of voice by telling a story and physical tableaus and movement. Students will now be delving into the context of specific points in Drama history.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Mini formative assessments will be used throughout the module to recap on key terminology.
  • Criteria B – Developing their understanding of Greek theatre and key information. Also with their performance.
  • Criteria C – Using their creative thinking skills students will be creating their own performance.
Module 4 - Commedia Dell'Arte 1

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the development of vocal and physical drama skills can be communicated and reflect theatre of the past to create characters. Identities and emotions can be communicated through different styles.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the differences and similarities between Greek Theatre and Commedia dell’arte?
  • What is the origin of Commedia dell’arte?
  • What is the key terminology in Commedia dell-arte?
  • What is physical theatre?
  • What is a stock situation?
  • What are the different types of Commedia characters?
  • What is improvisation?
  • How are masks used in Commedia dell’arte?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall voice and physical drama terminology confidently
  • Be able to create a Commedia dell’arte character by using voice and physical techniques
  • Be able to use Commedia dell’arte techniques including improvisation, masks, physical theatre and stock situation to create a piece of theatre.
  • Be able to recall the keywords used in Commedia dell’arte drama regularly and use appropriate language within the lesson
  • Be able to reflect on their work via self-assessment

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

During Module 3 students were beginning to use vocal and physical skills to create a piece of theatre. Now they are expanding their knowledge and understanding of those skills by strengthening those two drama skills by creating a Commedia dell’arte performance. Students will devise an interesting piece of theatre using styles they have learnt.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Knowing and Understanding

i. Demonstrate awareness of the the theatre style
ii. Demonstrate awareness of the role of the theatre style
iii. Demonstrate awareness of knowledge gained and theatre created.

Criterion C – Thinking Creatively

i. Identify an artistic intention
ii. Identify alternatives and perspectives.
iii. Demonstrate the exploration of ideas.”

Module 5 - Commedia Dell'Arte 2

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the development of vocal and physical drama skills can be communicated and reflect theatre of the past to create characters. Identities and emotions can be communicated through different styles.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own Commedia Dell’arte performance?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?
  • How will you develop your ideas to achieve the artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall what Commedia Dell’Arte is and how physical/vocal skills are used
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to devise creative ideas of Commedia Dell’Arte in duets and quartets
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the basic knowledge of Commedia Dell’Arte and will now be able to apply this and establish links between the context and the skills, permitting a reflection on development of expression overtime. The students’ are now exploring more advance skills and will now be able to start putting these into a performance context.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion B – Developing Skills

i. Demonstrate learning and development of skills and techniques.
ii. Demonstrate using skills and techniques to create or perform drama.

Criterion D – Responding

i. Identify connections between the theatre style, its context and your prior learning.
ii. Recognise what inspires or influences the theatre style.
iii. Evaluate certain principles/skills of drama.

Module 6 - Pantomime

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a pantomime?
  • What is the origin of pantomime?
  • What is the key terminology used in pantomime?
  • What do you recall about physical theatre?
  • What do you recall about stock situation/characters?
  • How do you create melodrama situations?
  • How is music used in the theatre?
  • How do you demonstrate vocal and physical skills learned throughout the modules?
  • Why is it important to understand and demonstrate how to develop own and others’ work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to develop knowledge of the pantomime genre
  • Be able to understand the main features of pantomime
  • Be able to explore the acting style used in pantomime
  • Be able to create stock characters typical of pantomime
  • Be able to create Melodrama situations typical of pantomime
  • Be able to understand stereotypes in drama
  • Be able to understand the role of music in the theatre
  • Be able to develop our understanding of the role of the audience
  • Be able to reflect on students work via self-assessment and peer-assessment

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Throughout the year students have been working on their vocal and physical skills to perform and devise short pieces based on a verity of techniques and emotions. Students will be creating a longer and more technical piece of theatre but by drawing upon previous techniques.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Students will be given mini quizzes to complete throughout this module to check for understanding and to identify any gaps within knowledge. As well as their end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their skills on understanding the differences between the three genres and being able to create a performed based on one of the genres.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking when it comes to creating their own performance based around one of the screen genres.
  • Criteria D – Students will be able to respond to the peer feedback they have received and incorporate the improvements to their performance.
Module 1 - Advertising

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Persuasive texts, specifically in marketing and politics, use language intended to influence our behaviour and decisions.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What are the main vocal and physical skills used in drama?
  • How do actor presenters use their vocal skills to sell or persuade in an advert?
  • How do actor presenters use their physical skills to sell or persuade in an advert?
  • What are the types of way adverts persuade their audiences?
  • How do adverts use bribery, trickery, flattery, guilt and irritation to be memorable and draw audiences in?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to adapt vocal and physical skills according to the character/presenter in the advert
  • Be able to understand how language and imagery is used to persuade and manipulate
  • Be able to understand and demonstrate how to develop own and others’ work
  • Be able to assess own work and work of others

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

In Year 7 students were focusing on the basics of physical and vocal skills and being able to create characters through those devises. In advertising, students will develop these skills as well as focus more on their performance skills such as stage presence, body language, eye contact, etc.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – A mini quiz will be set at the start of every lesson throughout this module to focus on recapping and retrieval of new information and keywords. As well as an end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria C – Students will use their creative thinking skills to create a performance of an advertisement.
Module 2 - Introduction of Monologues (Missing)

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon
the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to
an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a stimulus?
  • What is he difference between a tableu and a freeze frame?
  • What is a mime?
  • What is the difference between an open and a closed question?
  • What is a soliloquy? What is a monologue? What is the difference between them?
  • How do you use physical skills to enhance emotion?
  • How do you use vocal skills to enhance emotion?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to use an article to devise a monologue based on the character and situation
  • Be able to create a realistic monologue based on the stimulus “”missing””
  • Be able to use creative skills in order to devise a short monologue
  • Be able to improve and modify the performance through self and peer feedback
  • Be able to present a three dimensional character through the stimulus “”missing””
  • Be able to present their monologue to an audience.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Pupils would have just completed the Advertising scheme of work and therefore will be used to working in different sized groups. In this unit hey will build upon their acting skills but this time I am looking for realism.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Mini quizzes will be used throughout the module to recap on prior knowledge and brand new knowledge. As well as an end of module quiz.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their understanding skills when working from a stimulus.
  • Criteria D – Students will be able to respond correctly to a stimulus and also respond to feedback given to improve their performance
Module 3 - Introduction to Script Writing

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is tone?
  • What are stage directions?
  • What are verbal and non-verbal cues and how to use them in writing?
  • How do you create dialogue?
  • How do you create subtext within dialogue?
  • How do you develop characters within a script?
  • How do you develop and rehearse a script?
  • How do you give effective feedback to contribute to shaping work?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to come up with creative ideas to create a character, environment and theme
  • Be able to develop your understanding of character by creating a protagonist and antagonist and understanding the differences between them
  • Be able to write a script with stage directions, cues, dialogue and subtext
  • Be able to layout a script appropriately
  • Be able to understand how to develop and rehearse a script
  • Be able to understand how effective feedback can shape your work

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students have written their own scripts such as monologues and small group devised pieces, however they would not have been introduced to stage directions and other rules used in script writing.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Students will have frequent mini quizzes to recap on keywords/information learnt throughout the module. As well as an end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their understanding of how to correctly write a script and improve their writing and imagination.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking and imagination when creating their scripts and performances.
Module 4 - Genres on the Screen 1

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the drama created for screen has been communicated and interpreted by actors and directors that leads to the many and varied genres showing differences in personal and cultural expression.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is the difference between drama on the stage and screen?
  • What are the different genres you see on the screen?
  • What is Melodrama?
  • What different types of comedy do you see on the screen?
  • What are the dramatic characteristics in the horror and thriller genre?
  • What are the differences between thriller and horror genres?
  • What are the characteristics of a Soap Opera?
  • How are different camera angles used on the screen to build emotion and mark the moment?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to create short devised pieces based on comedy sub-genres such as Slapstick, Farce and Parody.
  • Be able to create short devised pieces based on horror/thriller genres
  • Be able to create short devised pieces based on soap opera
  • Be able to create your characters based on stock characters
  • Be able to devise a more developed piece from a genre and use camera angles to reflect emotions for screen

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Throughout the year students have been working on their vocal and physical skills to perform and devise short pieces based on a verity of techniques and emotions. Students will be creating a longer and more technical piece of theatre but by drawing upon previous techniques.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Students will be given mini quizzes to complete throughout this module to check for understanding and to identify any gaps within knowledge. As well as their end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their skills on understanding the differences between the three genres and being able to create a performed based on one of the genres.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking when it comes to creating their own performance based around one of the screen genres.
  • Criteria D – Students will be able to respond to the peer feedback they have received and incorporate the improvements to their performance.
Module 5 - Genre on the Screen 2

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Knowledge of how the drama created for screen has been communicated and interpreted by actors and directors that leads to the many and varied genres showing differences in personal and cultural expression.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What skills or techniques will you need to create your own performance written in the style of “”genres for Screen””?
  • What targets for improvement could you set for yourself?
  • How will you achieve these targets?
  • How will you develop your ideas to achieve the artistic intention?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to recall what the Genres on the Screen are and how the physical and vocal are used
  • Be able to write reflective logs each week to show how you have improved/changed composition over time
  • Be able to create your own performance written in the style of “genres for Screen”
  • Be able to give self and peer constructive feedback to improve

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have learned about the fundamental knowledge of Genres for Screen and will now be able to apply this and establish links between the context and the skills, permitting a reflection on development of expression overtime. The students’ are now exploring more advance skills and will now be able to start putting these into a performance context.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Students will have frequent mini quizzes to recap on keywords/information learnt throughout the module. As well as an end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking to create their own interpretation of Macbeth for their assessment.
Module 6 - Introduction to Devising

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a stimulus?
  • What are the physical drama skills?
  • What is tableau, freeze frame, thought-tracking, cross-cutting and marking the moment?
  • What are vocal drama skills?
  • How can a solo,duet and group devise an effective performance with the use of theatre and acting techniques learned?
  • What are the rules of structuring a piece of theatre?
  • Why is it important to collaborate with others?
  • What is the context of the devised piece?
  • Who is the target audience of the devised piece?
  • What is the setting of the devised piece?
  • Why is it important to research your stimulus?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to come up with creative ideas to a stimulus related to a real life situation in popular culture when creating a performance
  • Be able to create a realistic scene based on a stimulus related to a real life situation in popular culture
  • Be able to use creative skills in order to devise a short realistic scene based on the stimulus
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills in your devised piece
  • Be able to use theatre techniques such as thought-tracking, tableau, marking the moment and cross-cutting to develop your devised piece
  • Be able to improve and modify the performance through self and peer feedback

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Throughout Y7 and Y8 Students worked developing their vocal and physical skills to portray an array of characters and certain themes.

  • Students will reflect on acting aims/ intentions
  • Students will understand audience reaction/ response

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Students will have frequent mini quizzes to recap on keywords/information learnt throughout the module. As well as an end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their understanding of how to create a devised piece by their final performance.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking skills when it comes to devising their own theatre performance.
  • Criteria D – Students will be able to respond to the feedback they have given and transfer these improvements to their performance.

Contemporary Playwrights

Module 1 - Study of Set Text (DNA)

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Playwrights create plays to position audiences to respond in a particular way.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Dennis Kelly?
  • When was DNA written?
  • What is DNA about?
  • What is the social/historical context around DNA?
  • Who are the main characters in DNA?
  • What are the main themes surrounding DNA?
  • What techniques does Dennis Kelly use in his writing of DNA?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the plot and characters in DNA
  • Be able to understand the historical/social context of DNA
  • Be able to explore a key scenes from DNA
  • Be able to perform key scenes from DNA and discuss the practical choices you made

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

By the end of Y8 students will know how to work effectively in groups and develop their collaborative skills. Students will know the expectations of a Drama lesson and should be identify the 5’s in Drama including: Confidence, Communication, Co-operation, Commitment and Concentration. Students will know how to successfully evaluate peer work.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criteria A – Frequent knowledge quizzes will be used at the start of the lesson recapping on prior knowledge, As well as a final end of unit assessment.

Criteria C – Students will be recreating a scene from the play using creative thinking.

  • How can you show hierarchy in a performance?
  • How can juxtaposition play a key part in your performance?
  • What knowledge are you going to use to create your performance?
Module 2 - Study of Set Text (Hard to Swallow)

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Playwrights create plays to position audiences to respond in a particular way.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Mark Wheeler?
  • When was Hard to Swallow written?
  • What is Hard to Swallow about?
  • What is the social/historical context around Hard to Swallow?
  • Who are the main characters in Hard to Swallow?
  • What are the main themes surrounding Hard to Swallow?
  • What techniques does Mark Wheeler use in his writing of Hard to Swallow?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the effects of anorexia and other issues that young people may encounter during adolescence
  • Be able to understand the techniques that Mark Wheeler uses such as direct speech and physical theatre.
  • Be able to devise a performance based on the themes and ideas communicated in the play.
  • Be able to learn how drama can be used to raise people’s awareness of an issue in society.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how to read a text and understand how a playwright creates a script, the themes, characters and setting. They would have learned some emotive and sensitive subjects and how to portray this in a drama setting.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Frequent knowledge quizzes will be used at the start of the lesson recapping on prior knowledge, As well as a final end of unit assessment.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their skills when it comes to devising a physical theatre performance.
  • Criteria D – Students will be able to respond to peer feedback to improve their performance for their assessment.
Module 3 - Study of Set Text (Blood Brothers)

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

Playwrights create plays to position audiences to respond in a particular way.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Willy Russell?
  • When was Blood Brothers written?
  • What is Blood Brothers about?
  • What is the social/historical context around Blood Brothers?
  • Who are the main characters in Blood Brothers?
  • What are the main themes surrounding Blood Brothers?
  • What techniques does Willy Russell use in his writing of Blood Brothers?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to understand the plot and character of Blood Brothers
  • Be able to understand the historical/social context of Blood Brothers
  • Be able to demonstrate competent use of control with vocal skills
  • Be able to demonstrate competent use of control with physical skills
  • Be able to justify characters actions. Pupils will apply one of the theories of Stanislavski.
  • Be able to convey a convincing and realistic scene from Blood Brothers.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students’ knowledge of theatre skills should be drawn upon when explaining how to read a text and understand how a playwright creates a script, the themes, characters and setting. They would have studied characters in detail as well as the importance of recurring themes in plays.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Frequent knowledge quizzes will be used at the start of the lesson recapping on prior knowledge, As well as a final end of unit assessment.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their learning about different types of theatre and also staging.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking skills to create their own physical theatre performance.

20th Century Theatre Practitioner Pioneers

Module 4 - Theatre Practioners Part 1: Naturalism Vs. Non-Naturalism

General Principle of Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Brecht?
  • Who is Stanislavski?
  • What is Naturalistic theatre?
  • What is Non-Naturalistic theatre?
  • Why did Stanislavski developed system?
  • Why did Brecht develop his system?
  • What is expected from actors training with Stanislavski’s methods?
  • What is expected from actors training with Brecht’s methods?
  • What is epic theatre?
  • How do you gain confidence in applying a non-naturalistic style?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explore Brecht’s theatrical works and be able to identify key methods
  • Be able to explore Stanislavski’s theatrical works and be able to identify key methods
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills associated with the Brecht method
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills associated with the Stanislavski method
  • Be able to create and develop work within a naturalistic style.
  • Be able to create and develop work within a non-naturalistic style.

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have previously learned about three modern playwrights. Across module 4 and 5 students will be focusing on 20th century theatre and looking into particular practitioners with methods that were groundbreaking for theatre and still used today.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion A – Knowing and Understanding

i. Demonstrate knowledge of the music. (Ai)
ii. Demonstrate knowledge of the role of the music. (Aii)
iii. Use knowledge to inform your musical choices. (Aiii)

Criterion C – Thinking Creatively

i. Outline a clear and achievable artistic intention (Ci)
ii. Outline alternatives, perspectives, and imaginative solutions (Cii)
iii. Demonstrate exploration of ideas to a finish product (Ciii)

Module 5 - Theatre Practitioners Part 2: Expressionism Vs. Surrealism

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • Who is Artaud?
  • Who is Bercoff?
  • What is Expressionist theatre?
  • What is Surrealist theatre?
  • What is theatre of cruelty?
  • What is total theatre?
  • Why did Artaud developed system?
  • Why did Bercoff develop his system?
  • What is expected from actors training with Artaud’s methods?
  • What is expected from actors training with Bercoff’s methods?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to explore Artaud’s theatrical works and be able to identify key methods
  • Be able to explore Bercoff’s theatrical works and be able to identify key methods
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills associated with the Artaud method
  • Be able to use physical and vocal skills associated with the Bercoff method
  • Be able to create and develop work within a expressionist style
  • Be able to create and develop work within a surrealist style

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Students would have previously learned about three modern playwrights. Across module 4 and 5 students will be focusing on 20th century theatre and looking into particular practitioners with methods that were groundbreaking for theatre and still used today.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

Criterion B – Developing Skills

i. Demonstrate learning and development of skills and techniques. (Bi)
ii. Demonstrate using skills and techniques to create or perform music. (Bii)

Criterion D – Responding

i. Outline connections and transfer learning to new settings (Di)
ii. Create an artistic response inspired by the world around them. (Dii)
iii. Evaluate the artwork of self and others. (Diii)

Establishing links between all modules studied so far to develop performance skills

Module 6 - Devising Theatre

General Principle or Big Idea (Statement of Inquiry)

The creation of a successful work is dependent upon the interpretation of the medium and communication of an idea to an audience.

Core declarative knowledge: What should students know?

  • What is a stimulus?
  • How will you come up with ideas and take responsibility for the stimulus choices?
  • What are the physical and vocal drama skills? and how do you use them to create an effective devised piece?
  • How can a solo, duet and group devise an effective performance with the use of theatre and acting techniques learned?
  • What is the process of creating devised drama?
  • How will you carry out research on your stimulus?
  • How will you develop your own ideas?
  • Why is it important to collaborate with others?
  • How will you rehearse, refine and amend your work in progress?
  • Why is it important to analyse and evaluate your own process of creating devised drama?

Core procedural knowledge: What should students be able to do?

  • Be able to pick from a range of stimulus and be able to mindmap and collaborate on ideas
  • Be able to develop and apply physical and vocals to your own devised piece
  • Be able to draw upon and demonstrate a practical understanding of previous drama set texts and practitioners learned in previous modules to devise a confident piece
  • Be able to log, reflect and make targets on progress being made via a devising journal
  • Be able to improve and modify the performance through self and peer feedback

Links to prior learning (to be made explicit and tested)

Throughout KS3 Students worked on acting skills to show character/ themes/ genre/ style by using their physical and vocal skills

  • Students will reflect on acting aims/ intentions
  • Students will understand audience reaction/ response as well as mood and atmosphere.

Link to assessment (criterion A and ‘x’)

  • Criteria A – Students will have frequent mini quizzes to recap on keywords/information learnt throughout the module. As well as an end of module assessment quiz.
  • Criteria B – Students will be able to develop their understanding of how to create a devised piece by their final performance.
  • Criteria C – Students will be able to use their creative thinking skills when it comes to devising their own theatre performance.
  • Criteria D – Students will be able to respond to the feedback they have given and transfer these improvements to their performance.